Posts Tagged ‘nocturia’

Urinating at Night? Don’t Suffer Incontinence In Silence

November 3, 2013

Getting up at night to urinate, i.e., nocturia, more than you would like? If so, this article will help you control that problem and provide you with a good nights sleep. Nocturnal polyuria (NP) has a high prevalence among older adults and is commonly encountered in nursing homes. The condition can cause nocturia or nocturnal incontinence (ie, involuntary discharge of urine at night), both of which are highly bothersome problems. Although these conditions are prevalent in nursing homes, little research has focused on how they may impact quality of life among nursing home residents.
The prevalence of NP within the study population of nursing home patients was 84%. Of the individuals with NP, 17 (37%) reported nocturnal incontinence.
Based on these findings, the investigators surmised that nocturnal hormonal imbalances might contribute to the increased urine volume in these residents.

Bottom Line: Nursing hone patients have an increased incidence of incontinence and can significantly increase the residents of the nursing home quality of life. Many of these patients can be helped with medication or with behavior therapy

When Your Bladder Ruins a Good Night’s Sleep-Taming the Overactive Bladder

August 19, 2011

Nothing ruins a good night’s sleep more than getting up multiple times to empty your bladder. Often those millions of American men and women are exhausted in the morning because their sleep was interrupted to many times. Now there’s a few steps you can take to tame that overactive bladder.

For the approximately 16% of people over the age of 18 who have an overactive bladder (OAB), getting up two or more times a night can become a regular occurrence. Even if they make it to the bathroom in time, they wake up so often to urinate that they aren’t getting a good night’s sleep.
Generally, the amount of urine in our bodies decreases and becomes more concentrated at night, so we can sleep six or eight hours without having to get up to use the bathroom more than once. But many people with OAB have nocturia, the need to urinate several times a night, which interrupts their sleep cycles.
Even worse, there are some men and women who are particularly sound sleepers or can’t get out of bed fast enough can wind up with wet sheets.
Take these steps to prevent accidents from happening:
Limit your fluid intake before bedtime. Try not to drink any liquids after 5 p.m. or 6 p.m.
Avoid foods and beverages that can irritate your bladder. If you can’t cut them out entirely, skip them in the hours before bedtime to help prevent nocturia. That includes:
Caffeine, which is a diuretic, which increases urine output
Alcohol
Citrus juices
Cranberry juice — though it is touted as great for bladder health, it is actually an irritant if you have OAB
Spicy foods, like curries
Acidic foods, such as tomatoes and tomato sauces
Chocolate
Artificial sweeteners

Double-void before bed or urinate twice, right before bed. For example, you can go to the bathroom, then brush your teeth and go through the rest of your bedtime routine. Then, just before you’re about to lie down — even if you don’t feel like you have to go — try to urinate and see if you can squeeze out another tablespoon or so.

Do Kegel exercises. Done regularly, they help control an overactive bladder. They will trigger a reflex mechanism to relax the bladder. If you feel a tremendous urge to urinate, doing a Kegel before you run to the bathroom will help settle down the bladder spasm and help you hold it until you get there.
Kegels simply involve contracting and releasing the muscles around the opening of your urethra, just as you do when going to the bathroom. You can learn what a Kegel exercise feels like by starting, then stopping, your urine stream. Start with three sets of 8-12 contractions. Hold them for six to 10 seconds each and perform these three to four times per week.

OAB and Your Sex Life
OAB can interfere with sexual intimacy another important activity that takes place in the bed. There’s nothing that can shut down an intimate moment faster than realizing you’ve lost control of your bladder during sexual intimacy — something that happens for many people with OAB. About 15% of my patients report having incontinence during sex.

When you’re being intimate, you’re used to secretions and moistness, but the thought that it’s actually urine leakage is really upsetting and uncomfortable. Usually it’s the female patient who has the leakage, and it’s actually more bothersome for her than for her partner.

Tips for Getting Your Groove Back
There are some things you can do to ward off discomfort or embarrassment during sex.

Talk about it. First, know that your partner will probably be a lot more understanding than you expect. Then bring it up before you have intercourse. Plan and prepare for sex, just as you do for bedtime. Double-void, cut back on fluids, and avoid foods and beverages that are likely to irritate your bladder. This means passing up that romantic glass of wine to get you in the mood.

Keep up the Kegels. Doing these several times a day — and even during intercourse — will help prevent urine leakage during sex.
All of these approaches can help you manage your overactive bladder at night, letting you get a better night’s sleep and have a more active and satisfying sex life.
Bottom Line: An overactive bladder can wreck havoc with sleep, your sex life, and your entire life. I suggest you try these few self-help ideas. If they do not resolve the problem, then contact your doctor, urologist or gynecologist. Help is available. You don’t have to be embarrassed and tired because your overactive bladder is controlling your life.

This article has been modified from “Putting an Overactive Bladder to Bed-Insights for Good Sleep and Good Sex”
By Gina Shaw

http://www.webmd.com/urinary-incontinence-oab/oab-11/sex-and-sleep

Getting Up At Night To Pee Doesn’t Have To Be

February 5, 2011

NEW YORK(Reuters Health) – A new study finds that one in five U.S. men have to get up at least twice a night to empty their bladders — which for some could signal an underlying medical problem or even contribute to poorer health.

Known as nocturia, those frequent overnight trips to the bathroom can be a sign of a health condition, ranging from a urinary tract infection to diabetes to chronic heart failure. In men, a benign enlargement of the prostate can also be a cause.

For some people, the constant sleep disruptions can themselves cause problems — contributing to depression symptoms or, particularly in older adults, falls.

On the other hand, getting up during the night to urinate can also be normal. If you drink a lot of fluids close to bedtime, for example, don’t be surprised if your bladder wakes you up at night.

Nocturia also becomes more common with age. Part of that is related to older adults’ higher rate of medical conditions. But it could also result from a decrease in bladder capacity that comes with age.

The researchers found that  men age 20 and up, 21 percent said they had gotten up at least twice per night to urinate.

Nocturia was more common among African-American men (30 percent) than those of other races and ethnicities (20 percent). Not surprisingly, it also increased with age: Just 8 percent of men ages 20 to 34 reported it, compared with 56 percent of men age 75 or older.

Other factors linked to an increased risk of nocturia included prostate enlargement, a history of prostate cancer, high blood pressure and depression.

Nocturia can also be a side effect of some medications, such as diuretics used to treat high blood pressure. This study did not have information on men’s medication use.

Avoiding caffeine and a large fluid intake at night may help as may other lifestyle tactics, like adjusting your sleep habits.

One recent study of 56 older adults with nocturia found that lifestyle changes — including fluid restriction, limiting any excess hours in bed, moderate daily exercise, and keeping warm while sleeping — helped more than half of the patients significantly cut down their overnight trips to the bathroom.

There are also medications available specifically for overactive bladder and nocturia. Those include a synthetic version of a hormone, anti-diuretic hormone,  that keeps the body from making urine at night, a drug that blocks the ability of the bladder muscles to contract, and antidepressants that make it harder to urinate by increasing tension at the bladder neck.

The bottom line for men is that bothersome nocturia is something they should bring up to their doctor.

SOURCE: bit.ly/fGZKNN Journal of Urology, online January 19, 2011

Getting Up At Night to Pee May be Hazardous to Your Health

July 25, 2010

Nocturia or getting up at night to urinate is associated with an increased risk of death.  Both men and women who get up at night to urinate are at increased risk of dying compared to men and women who don’t have to get up at night to urinate.  Also, it has been shown that the more a man or women gets up at night to urinate, the greater the risk or dying.  Although the exact mechanism is not known, it may be related to sleep deprivation, which may have an adverse effect on metabolic function leading to obesity and diabetes both of which are known risk factors for mortality or dying.

Bottom Line: If you are getting up at night to urinate, see your doctor as testing can identify the cause and treatment can be started to cure or to certainly decrease the number of times you get up to go to the bathroom.

11 Suggestions For Decreasing Prostate Symptoms

May 11, 2010

The prostate gland is walnut sized organ at the base of the bladder.  In order men the gland increases in size and causes symptoms such as going to the bathroom frequently, dribbling after urination, and getting up at night to urinate.  Here are a 11 suggestions that you might consider to relieve those symptoms.

1.  Don’t drink anything several hours before you go to sleep.

2.  Avoid caffeinated beverages such as coffee and tea as the caffeine acts as a diuretic

3.  Limit your alcohol consumption especially at the dinner meal.

4.  Avoid spicy foods.

5.  Take medications such as your diuretics or water pills early in the day when going to the bathroom to urinate is not such an inconvenience.

6.  Avoid antihistamines and decongestants

7.  Don’t hold off going to the restroom

8.  Use the clock to help with urination. Make an effort to urinate every 3-4 hours.  Putting your bladder on a schedule is very helpful and a good habit to have.

9. Go and then go again. Stand at the toilet and empty your bladder, walk away from the toilet for a minute or two and then return and try emptying the bladder again.

10. Avoid cold seats such as at football games in the winter.

11. If you bike ride, especially for long distances, stand on the pedals every 10 or 15 minutes to take the pressure off of your prostate gland.

Bottom Line: These steps won’t cure the enlarged prostate but they will lessen the symptoms.  If your symptoms persist, consider a visit to your urologist


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