Archive for August, 2014

Arimidex For Men

August 15, 2014

Developed for treatment of breast cancer in postmenopausal women, Arimidex blocks aromatase enzymes from converting male hormones, i.e., testosterone into estrogens.

Both estrogen and testosterone exist in males and females. Females produce estrogen in the ovaries; males produce testosterone in the testicles. Additionally, small amounts of sex hormones are produced in the adrenal glands meaning that women produce some testosterone, and men produce some estrogen. These hormones also control sexual characteristics in adult males and females. An overabundance of the male hormone testosterone in a female can cause masculine characteristics such as a deep voice, facial hair or increased muscle mass. Men with too much estrogen can develop breasts (gynecomastia) or other unwanted female characteristics.

Aromatase enzymes which exist in the liver, muscles and fat cells convert testosterone into estrogen. Since Arimidex is all about estrogen, it may seem unlikely that there are Arimidex uses in men.

Since the body’s aromatase enzymes convert testosterone into estrogen, increased female characteristics can also result from increased levels of testosterone. Men who take anabolic steroids in their quest for lean, muscular, sculpted bodies are dismayed to find that they also develop breasts and retain fluids. This is where Arimidex enters the picture. Arimidex blocks the aromatase enzyme from creating estrogen in women cancer patients, it could be good for men who take testosterone to keep them from suffering the unwanted results of increased estrogen.

Arimidex is approved for use in the treatment of breast cancer in women from the FDA in 2002. It is not approved for use by men. However, in men who are testosterone deficient, who do not respond to testosterone replacement and have an elevated estrogen level, I believe a trial of Arimidex is warranted.

There is a wide range of Arimidex side effects, the most serious of which is weakening and/or thinning of the bones. More common and minor side effects of Anastrozole include bone and joint pain, vomiting, fatigue, and weakness. Despite the discomfort of these potential side effects, Arimidex’s ability to diminish tumor metastasis, increase the time between recurrences of cancer, and reduce the chance of cancer spreading to the other breast or other body parts make the side effects worth the risk.

No medication is without side effects, and this is especially true of cancer-fighting drugs and those which change the body’s production and regulation of hormones. Arimidex has several potential side effects.
The most common Anastrozole side effects include:
• Bone and joint pain
• Nausea
• Vomiting
• Hot flashes
• Weakness
• Fatigue
• Headache
• Loss of Appetite
• Constipation
• Diarrhea
• Heartburn
• Weight Gain
• Mood Changes
• Difficulty Sleeping
• Dizziness
• Vaginal Bleeding and/or dryness
• Dry Mouth
• Dry Skin
• Cough
• Hair Changes

One of the most important and potentially severe Arimidex side effects is bone problems, due to lower blood estrogen levels. When less estrogen reaches your bones, they become thinner and weaker. This in turn can lead to higher incidences of fractures and breaks, as well as osteoporosis. Most physicians will prescribe bisphosphonate medications to counteract these Anastrozole side effects. If you already have or are at a high likelihood of developing osteoporosis, your physician will probably not prescribe Arimidex.

Bottom line: Increased estrogen may be the culprit of some men’s lack of libido and erectile dysfunction. Arimidex may be helpful in that situation. A simple blood test can make the diagnosis.


Source: Arimidex Side Effects (Anastrozole) – Drugsdb.com http://www.drugsdb.com/rx/arimidex/arimidex-side-effects/#ixzz3AOL76QK8

Do’s and Don’ts of Douching-It May Cause Your UTI

August 9, 2014

I am 56 y\o female with recurrent urinary tract infections. I have been douching for many years and I was told by my urologist that the douching may be the culprit of my UTIs. Is that true?

Douching clears out the normal good bacteria of the vagina, which can upset the balance of bacteria in the vaginal area and make it easier to get UTIs. Allowing that bacteria to stay inside the vagina is a natural way to protect yourself from UTIs. Therefore, if you are prone to recurrent UTIs, then I suggest you deep six the douching.

What can you do to prevent UTIs?

Keep yourself hydrated. One of the best ways for preventing UTIs is to stay well hydrated, Drinking water can flush out bacteria from your bladder and lower your chances of getting a UTI.

I recommend urinating after sexual intimacy. Sexual activity may massage bacteria from the vagina into the urethra, the tube from the bladder to the outside of the body, which can then multiply and create an infection. Urinating after sex will expel the bacteria in the urethra and prevent the bacteria’s access to the bladder.

Drinking cranberry juice also seems to make it harder for bacteria to infect the urinary tract. Cranberry juice contains active compounds that are not destroyed by the digestive system after people drink them, but instead work to fight against bacteria, including E. coli, which is the most common bacteria causing UTIs. It appears that cranberry juice seems to prevent bacteria from sticking to the bladder wall.
Urinate frequently as holding urine probably can increase risk of having UTIs.

Wear cotton underwear. Bacteria grows in a moist, warm environment, so it’s a good idea to wear cotton underwear and clothes that aren’t too tight to allow air to flow and to keep the area dry. Avoid tight fitting jeans and exercise clothing.
See a doctor for persistent symptoms. If you don’t get better quickly with these non-medical suggestions or you have more than 3-4 infections per year, then it is time to obtain a medical opinion.

Bottom Line:
UTIs are a common malady affecting nearly every woman at some time during her adult life. There are several suggestions provided in this blog that you can do to decrease your likelihood of recurrences.

Weight Loss Surgery May Help Ease Urinary Incontinence

August 6, 2014

Urinary incontinence is a condition that significantly impacts a woman’s quality of life. Many have tried medical, non-medical, and surgical solutions. However, there is one sure way to improve control of urine loss and that is weight loss. Weight-loss surgery appears to have an additional side benefit — it may improve urinary incontinence symptoms in women.

A study found that nearly half of women in a weight-loss surgery program reported having incontinence prior to the procedure. After surgery, most of those women said their urinary symptoms either improved or disappeared.

The women “lost almost 30 percent of their body weight, and about two-thirds who had incontinence at the start were cured at one year with that amount of weight loss. Among those who continued to have incontinence, their incontinence frequency improved.

The women included in the study were severely obese, with a median BMI (body mass index) of 46. (Normal BMI is 25 or less. A women who is 5 feet 4 inches tall who weighs 268 pounds has a BMI of 46.

Health experts refer to obesity and incontinence as the “twin epidemics.” 25 to 50 percent of women have urinary incontinence. Of those, 70 percent are obese or a BMI greater than 25.

There are several types of weight loss surgery — also known as bariatric surgery. Most of the women in the study had procedures known as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or gastric banding.

The improvement in incontinence symptoms continued during the study follow-up.

Both the weight loss and the improvement in incontinence lasted through three years. At year three, [about] 60 percent had remission. Remissions were defined as less than weekly episodes of incontinence. A quarter were completely dry.

The amount of weight loss was the strongest predictor of whether incontinence would improve or go away. Losing more pounds made urinary symptom improvement more likely.

In a previous study, a six-month focused program of weight loss and diet information helped reduce incontinence in obese women better than four weekly education sessions about weight loss and physical activity.

Personally, I have patients who have lost weight and it ended their stress incontinence. Those who lost by nonsurgical means also noticed improvement.

Weight loss improves leakage, probably due to less pressure on the bladder, less weight pressing on the bladder from above and beside. So it stands to reason that bariatric surgery would also benefit the problem of incontinence.

Like all surgeries, bariatric surgeries are not without risk. The procedures are accompanied by possibility of infection, blood clots and heart attacks, among others.
Costs for the surgery range greatly, from about $12,000 to $26,000, but are sometimes covered under insurance policies.

Bottom line: Incontinence affects millions of American women. Many women who are incontinent of urine are also overweight. A weight loss program may result in improvement in urinary incontinence.

Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/health/topics/HealthDay689981_20140723_Weight_Loss_Surgery_May_Help_Ease_Urinary_Incontinence.html#aKqadsre5sGCHck4.99

Incontinence in Women-You Don’t Have To Depend on Depends!

August 6, 2014

Many women suffer in silence with their problem of urinary incontinence. About 1\3 of women between 40-70 have a problem of urinary incontinence and it is more common in women after menopause. This blog will discuss the problem and what are some solutions to this common condition that affects the quality of life of so many women.

Urinary incontinence, the loss of bladder control, is a common and often embarrassing problem. The severity ranges from occasionally leaking urine during a cough or sneeze to having an urge to urinate that’s so sudden and strong it’s impossible to get to a toilet in time.

Having accidents as an adult can be deeply embarrassing and most women don’t want to talk about it, yet it is far more common than many sufferers realize.

And the condition not only affects women’s confidence – it can also lead to mental health issues. Half (51 per cent) of women with adult incontinence (AI) also suffer from depression.

Because of the embarrassment surrounding the condition 60 per cent never seek help from their doctors, and of those who do 28 per cent delay seeking treatment for up to three to five years because they are ashamed.
Yet this common phenomenon can happen to women at any age and for many reasons including childbirth, the menopause or strenuous exercise.
This condition can also affect patient’s sex lives, with more than a quarter admitting it made them worry about sexual intimacy with their partners.

A large majority women said they had to change everything from the clothes they wear, the bags they carry, the way they travel, where they go and how they socialize.
They don’t always realize that help is available and that there are the right products out there that offer the comfort and protection women need to live life to the full.

Low impact sports such as cycling, yoga or elliptical machine exercises are ideal activities for keeping fit without affecting a sensitive bladder condition.

Abdominal workouts such as sit ups, crunches or plank kicks place a lot of pressure on the pelvic floor. Opt for alternative exercises where breathing or the position itself supports the pelvic floor.

PELVIC FLOOR EXERCISES
Pelvic floor exercises and targeted Pilates and yoga exercises can be particularly helpful. By practicing at least three times a day, they can help strengthen the pelvic floor muscles and give more control when needed..

DRINK JUST ENOUGH
There’s no need to avoid drinking in order to reduce the urge to visit the bathroom. Limiting water intake makes urine more concentrated, which boosts the chances of bladder irritation.

NO HEAVY LIFTING
Lifting heavy objects is particularly bad for the pelvic floor and back. Ask for help instead.
Just Say No To Caffeine
Caffeine, alcohol and carbonated drinks could be your new worst enemies. Try limiting coffee, tea and carbonated beverages for a week or two as they can irritate a sensitive bladder.

SET A SCHEDULE
Your bladder is trainable. If you need to pass water frequently and need to rush to the restroom, ask your PCP about a daily schedule for building up the bladder’s holding capacity. Remember, allow your bladder to empty completely each time you go to the toilet.

WEAR BACK-UP
A growing number of pads for day and night use as well as absorbent underwear and bed pads are available at high street pharmacy chains. Wearing one may be the difference between being stuck at home and feeling able to go out for periods of time.
Most cases can be improved with simple lifestyle changes and pelvic floor exercises as well as by finding the right products for you.

Bottom Line: By doing daily pelvic floor exercises, you can decrease your incontinent episodes and not only build your pelvic floor muscles but also build your confidence.