Don’t Beat the Band to Treat the Enlarged Prostrate Gland

The prostate is just a walnut sized gland that forms a part of the male reproductive system. The gland is constructed of two lobes, or areas, surrounded by an outer layer of tissue. For reasons not entirely understood, the prostate gland becomes enlarged, causes problems with urination, and affects a man’s quality of life.  That may be the bad news.  The good news is that there are ways to treat it.

 

The prostate can be found in front of the rectum and just beneath the urinary bladder, where urine is stored. The prostate also encompasses the urethra, the duct by which urine passes out from the body. For most men, the nightly bathroom runs can be the very first indication of an enlarged prostate. Other symptoms might include problem beginning a flow of urine, leaking or dribbling.

 

During the early stage of prostate enlargement, the urinary bladder muscle becomes thicker and forces pee through the narrow urethra by contracting more strongly. Like grey hair, an enlarged prostate is just a natural byproduct of getting older, doctors say.

Although it is just not known why only some males develop an enlarged prostate, it is clear that increasing age is the primary risk factor. The problem is, the nightly bathroom runs can be frequent, finally edging their way into the day routine. I recommend seeing your doctor if you develop urinary difficulties because of an enlarged prostate.

 

Benign prostatic hypertrophy is a non-cancerous enhancement of the prostate gland, often found in men over the age of fifty. Problem in passing urine or pain when passing urine, a burning or stinging feeling when passing urine, strong, regular urge to pass urine, even when there is just a small amount of urine are the signs of benign prostatic hypertrophy.

 

Treatment for an enlarged prostate is dependent upon the symptoms and signs and their severity. In case you have significant problems, like urinary bleeding, persistent bladder infections, urinary bladder and kidney harm, your physician will likely recommend treatment.

 

In case your prostate is enlarged, but your symptoms are not too bothersome, treatment might not be necessary. This is referred to as watchful waiting.  If you and your doctor select this option, you will be asked to return about once a year for a symptom check, a prostate exam and a PSA test or prostate specific antigen test which is a screen test for prostate cancer in men between the ages of 50 and 75.

 

There are two kinds of medication that help to control the signs of an enlarged prostate, they are alpha blockers and alpha reductase Inhibitors.

The alpha blockers work by calming the muscles at the neck of the urinary bladder making urination easier. Alpha reductase inhibitors work be actually shrinking the size of the prostate gland.  An enlarged prostate now is just easier to treat if the treatment begins early. These medications have side effects including reducing the volume of the ejaculate at the time of sexual intimacy.  The alpha blockers also affect the ability to have cataract surgery which is very common in older men.  Finally, the drugs must be taken for the rest of man’s life.

 

Now there are minimally invasive treatments such as lasers, prostatic urethral implants or UroLift to open the prostate to allow an improved flow of urine from the bladder to the outside of your body, and the use of steam or water vapor to heat the prostate tissue to reduce its size and affect urine flow.

 

Finally, there are surgical procedures to remove the prostate tissue.  The most common is the transurethral resection of the prostate or TURP.  These operations require admission to the hospital, a general anesthesia so the patient doesn’t experience any pain, the use of a catheter for a few days, and several weeks or moths to return to normal activity.

 

Your doctor will explain the different treatments and which might be best for your situation.

 

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