Delayed Ejaculation-The Other Sexual Dysfunction

Unlike premature ejaculation—usually defined as ejaculating 3 minutes or less after penetration—there isn’t a set amount of time that constitutes delayed ejaculation.

Still, you may have it if you can’t orgasm within 20 minutes after penetration.

Statistically, that time frame is far enough away from the average guy’s norm of about 5 minutes.

Sound like you? Here’s everything you need to know about why it may be taking so long to finish in bed, and how to treat the condition.

What Causes Delayed Ejaculation?

Ejaculation is a complicated process that involves your brain, nerves, and muscles in your pelvic region. Your nerves send a signal from your brain to your pelvis muscles telling them to contract and release semen.

But when your nerves aren’t communicating properly—whether from a disease like diabetes or multiple sclerosis, or from aging—that “ejaculate now” message from your brain can get lost in translation.

Some drugs can also delay your ejaculation, especially those that affect your central nervous system.

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for depression, certain muscle relaxers, and anti-smoking meds may manipulate the neurotransmitters in your brain, which can postpone your ejaculatory response.

Then there are your hormone levels: Guys with low testosterone or low thyroid hormones may be more at risk for delayed ejaculation.

Psychological issues like anxiety, depression, performance anxiety, relationship conflict, or sexual shame, or even the fear of becoming a father can also hinder or delay an ejaculation.

Finally, if these problems pop up only when you’re with your partner, consider the way you masturbate. If you use an atypical technique—like rubbing your penis against a certain object, or sticking it into a vise-like device—your partner’s may not be able to replicate it.

Although endless sex sounds awesome, but many men with delayed ejaculation complain that the sustained effort makes them feel physically exhausted during the act. As a result a lot of men will actually have to stop sex before they orgasm.

Also, delayed ejaculation can be mentally draining. Men can start to feel depressed or anxious that they’re taking too long to finish.

The explanation is that if you stress about how long it’s taking orgasm, your body produces more of the hormone adrenaline and more adrenaline restricts the blood supply to penis resulting in difficulty holding or maintaining an erection thus contributing to a delay in ejaculation.

Treating delayed ejaculation begins with an appointment to see a urologist—preferably one who specializes in sexual medicine. The urologist will most likely order a full workup, including tests for testosterone, thyroid, and blood sugar levels.

At the present time there is no medication to treat delayed ejaculation. However, there are drugs that have been shown in small studies but without FDA approval to treat delayed ejaculation. These include cabergoline or oxytocin, which act on certain chemicals in your brain whose levels have been disrupted.  However, the most successful treatment includes both medical intervention and sexual counseling with a certified sex therapist.

Bottom Line: Delayed ejaculation is a common problem especially in middle aged and older men. Although no medical treatment is available, you can be helped and can solve the problem with a discussion with your doctor and perhaps a referral to a counselor or sex therapist.

Advertisements

Tags:

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: