Archive for the ‘Cialis’ Category

Take “One” Cialis And Call Me In The Morning-A New Treatment For Both Erectile Dysfunction and The Enlarged Prostate Gland

October 9, 2011

This past week the FDA has approved the use of Cialis, a drug commonly used in the treatment of erectile dysfunction, will also be approved for the management of benign enlargement of the prostate gland. Cialis, manufactured by Eli Lilly and Co., was approved for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) in 2003. It can now be used to treat ED AND prostate gland enlargement, or both if symptoms of the two conditions occur together.

Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a condition in which the prostate gland becomes enlarged, is common in older men. Symptoms include difficulty starting urination, a weak urine stream, a sudden urge to urinate and more frequent urination including awakening at night to empty the bladder. BPH can have a big impact on a patient’s quality of life if a man gets up more than a couple of times each night. Cialis offers these men another treatment option, particularly those who also have ED, which is also common in older men affecting nearly 33 million men in the United States.

In two clinical trials, men with BPH who took 5 milligrams of Cialis once daily experienced a significant improvement in their urinary symptoms of BPH compared to men who were treated with placebo.
Cialis should not be used in patients taking nitrates, for example nitroglycerin, because the combination can cause an unsafe decrease in blood pressure, the FDA said. And the use of Cialis in combination with alpha blockers for the treatment of BPH as there is a risk of lowering blood pressure.

Bottom Line: If you are experiencing both difficulty with urination and also have inability to successfully engage in sexual intimacy as often as you would like, you should speak to your doctor about the use of daily Cialis, 5mg, which is effective in treating both conditions with a single pill.

High Blood Pressure Can Lower Your Sex Life

September 29, 2011

Robert is a 53 year old man with high blood pressure. He has a job associated with stress. He is 25 pounds overweight. He rarely exercises and admits to being a little heavy handed with the saltshaker. He takes a diuretic, hydrochlorthiazide, and an anti-hypertensive medication and since beginning these two medications, he has noted that his sexual performance has gone into very low gear.

High blood pressure can get worse over time and cause problems with getting an erection. A major study showed that 26% of men with high blood pressure said they had erectile dysfunction (ED). That was twice the rate of ED in men with normal blood pressure. Some medicines for high blood pressure, such as diuretics, can also cause ED. But if you’re able to keep your blood pressure under control — even with medicines — you can help prevent your ED from getting worse. 


An estimated 15 million to 30 million men in the U.S. have ED. Some changes in sexual function are normal as a man ages. Erections may be less firm, or it may take you longer to get erect. ED is sometimes temporary, too. Stress, relationship issues, illness, and drug side effects may cause it. But if your erection difficulty is ongoing and it keeps you from having the sex life you want, it may be time to seek treatment.


Many men have problems getting or maintaining an erection at some point in their lives. If it happens occasionally, it is probably not a medical problem. But if you repeatedly have trouble — if it happens about a quarter of the time or more — you may want to talk to your doctor about treatment. .


Some drugs for high blood pressure may cause ED. These include diuretics (water pills) and beta-blockers. ACE inhibitors and calcium channel blockers are less likely to cause ED. If you started having erection problems after you began taking medicine, talk to your doctor. You may be able to switch to a drug that can lower your blood pressure without increasing your risk for ED.


Even with high blood pressure and ED, you can still have a good sex life. If your blood pressure is under control you may be able to take an ED pill. Cialis, Levitra, and Viagra are safe to take with most blood-pressure medicines. If ED pills aren’t for you, other proven treatments include implants, pumps, and injectable drugs.
 You also need to check your testosterone level if your sexual performance is not what you would like it to be or if your sex drive has gone into the tank.

Heart disease — a common complication of high blood pressure — and ED are commonly seen together. A blockage in a heart artery is a good indication that the same thing may be happening in arteries that supply blood to the penis, making it difficult to get an erection. Many men with heart disease can’t take ED pills due to an interaction with heart disease drugs called nitrates. But new research suggests some men with stable heart disease may be able to slowly stop taking nitrates if their doctor thinks they would benefit from an ED pill. Stopping nitrates can be dangerous, so talk to your doctor first. If ED pills aren’t for you, there are other ED treatments that are safe for men with heart disease.

Robert spoke to his doctor and got the message about the connection of ED and high blood pressure. He began an exercise program, lost the 25 pounds over a six-month period, and cut out salt in his diet. His blood pressure normalized and he was able to stop using the medication and he had a noticeable improvement in his sexual performance.

Bottom Line: High blood pressure can lower your sexual performance. Treating the high blood pressure and healthy life style changes can also significantly improve ED.

This article was excerpted from an article by Brunilda Nazario, MD appearing in WebMD

When Viagra, Levitra and Cialis Do Not Work In Diabetic Men-Other Treatment Options For Erectile Dysfunction

May 27, 2011

Diabetes is a risk factor for developing erectile dysfunction (ED).  However, the drugs that are commonly used to treat ED, Viagra, Levitra, and Cialis, are less likely to be effective in men with diabetes.  That doesn’t mean that your sex life is over.  Many of these men will find improvement in second line treatments such as injection therapy, where a drug, prostaglandin, is injected directly into the penis to increase the blood supply to the tissues that are responsible for an erection.  Also, there are vacuum devices that create a negative pressure around the penis and allows more blood to enter the penis which is then trapped with a special rubber band placed at the base of the penis.  Finally, if second line treatments do not work, there are surgical procedures where a prosthesis is placed in the penis.  This consists of two cylinders that are filled with a salt solution, a reservoir to hold the solution that is inserted behind the muscles of the lower abdomen and a pump that is placed beside the testicle in the scrotum.  By squeezing the pump in the scrotum, fluid transferred from the reservoir to the cylinders in the penis creating a natural erection.  When the man wishes the erection to subside, the pump is squeezed and the fluid returns from the cylinders back to the reservoir and the penis becomes naturally soft.  The procedure for the insertion of the prosthesis takes about 20 minutes and is done on a one-day stay basis not requiring hospitalization.  Most men can begin having intercourse 4 weeks after the insertion of the prosthesis. 

For more information please go to my website, www.neilbaum.com, or refer to the article on the “Dangling Stress Test” at http://www.neilbaum.com/erectile-dysfunction—the-dangling-stress-test.html