Archive for the ‘Female sexual dysfunction’ Category

Woman Can Turn On Just Like Men-Addyi, Female Viagra

October 27, 2015

Women have been waiting for decades to catch up with men in the area of intimacy with their partners. Men have been fortunate that Viagra, Cialis, and Levitra have worked wonders for millions of American men. Today there is a female Viagra, called Addyi or flibanserin that is helping women with a decreased sexual desire.

Experts are calling Addyi, the so-called “female Viagra” that’s become the first-ever FDA-approved pill for hypoactive sexual desire disorder, a revolution for women’s sexual health.

The approval of Addyi is the most important advancement in female sexual health since the oral contraceptive was approved in 1960.

It validates women’s right to treatment for sexual problems and their right to sexual health. Let the truth be told that Addyi validates that there is as much biology as psychology with regard to women’s sexual function and this is the same for men.
Addyi also known as the “little pink pill,” doesn’t work the same way that Viagra does in men. Instead of affecting blood flow to the genitals, as Viagra does, Addyi targets certain serotonin receptors in the central nervous system within the brain —similar to how anti-depression medications target other receptors — in order to improve sexual desire.

Until Addyi there were no FDA-approved drugs that targeted low sexual desire in either men or women. The FDA’s approval of Addyi to the breakthrough in men’s sexual health research when Viagra was first approved in 1998. Before then, doctors told men that erectile dysfunction was all in their heads and the only treatment offered men was testosterone which was seldom effective. Now, in 2015, we accept that there are physical reasons such as diabetes, heart disease, and hundreds of medications that result in men not being able to obtain or sustain erections. Addyi’s introduction to the marketplace could do the same for the estimated 5.5 million to 8.6 million U.S. women suffering from hypoactive sexual desire disorder, meaning a chronic lack of interest in sex.

Addyi was originally formulated as an anti-depressant. While it failed to treat depression, researchers noticed that it did increase sexual desire. Sprout Pharmaceuticals then tested it for safety and effectiveness in more than 11,000 women before winning the recent FDA approval. In three randomized studies women who took Addyi had between one-half to one more satisfying sexual event per month on average than women who took placebo pills. It also increased sexual desire as compared to the placebo, as well as lowered distress related to sexual desire dysfunction.

Although the root causes of low sexual desire in women include relationship issues and changing hormone levels due to aging.

The drug’s side effects, which include severely low blood pressure and loss of consciousness if taken with alcohol, are comparable to the side effects of psychoactive medications that were able to win FDA approval far more easily than Addyi. The most common side effects were dizziness, sleepiness, nausea and fatigue, which is why the pill is recommended for use before bed.

Bottom Line: Women with decreased sexual desire now have a medication that may solve that problem. Addyi has now been approved by the FDA for the treatment of low sexual desire in women. For more information, speak to your physician.

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Little Blue Pill (Viagra) For Men and Now A Little Pink Pill (Addyi) For Women

August 24, 2015

Now women with sexual dysfunction will have a solution to their problem with decrease in libido or sex drive. A 2002 study found that up to one-third of adult women might experience hypoactive sexual desire disorder, a technical term for when women lack sexual desire or fantasy.
Recently the FDA approved flibanserin, which will be sold as Addyi, for the treatment of sexual dysfunction in premenopausal women.
This is the first FDA approved treatment for sexual desire in men or women.

Today’s approval provides women distressed by their low sexual desire with an approved treatment option. The approval is not without warnings. In fact, the agency approved the drug with a risk warning to ensure safety. Of greatest concern, an increased risk of severe low blood pressure, so low it can cause a temporary loss of consciousness. This is more of a concern in patients who drink alcohol while taking the drug. The doctor will be required to warn patients of the risks of consuming alcohol while taking Addyi.

Addyi is frequently referred to as “female Viagra” because it’s a pill for sexual dysfunction in women. However, experts say it’s a misnomer to describe it as such because it works in a distinctly different way to target the brain.
Viagra treats erectile dysfunction, a physical problem, and does not induce sexual desire. Addyi works on the central nervous system, which is why it’s in the same category as an antidepressant.
Another difference is that men take Viagra as needed before a sexual encounter, and women will need to take Addyi once every night. Taking it at night will reduce the likelihood of adverse reactions from low blood pressure and sleepiness or depression from a depressed central nervous system.
Other common side effects include dizziness, nausea, fatigue, insomnia and dry mouth.
In clinical trials, women taking the drug experienced a 37% increase in sexual desire.

Addyi will cost about the same per month as a one month supply of Viagra for men.

Bottom Line: Nearly as many women as men suffer from sexual dysfunction. Addyi is the first drug to address this problem in women. However, women need to be cautious about the use of this new medication. For more information, speak to your physician.

It Has Finally Arrived-A Female Viagra

June 27, 2015

For nearly two decades men have had oral medication, Viagra, Levitra, or Cialis, to help them obtain and maintain an erection to help them engage successfully in sexual intimacy. Now, at last, there is a female Vaigra.

The first “female Viagra” came one step closer to coming to market as a key advisory committee to the Food and Drug Administration voted in June to recommend that the FDA approve the drug, flibanserin, for the treatment of female sexual dysfunction.

The drug is designed to boost the low sexual desire of otherwise healthy women. The FDA is expected to render a final decision by the end of the summer.

The drug has potential side effects which include fainting, nausea, dizziness, sleepiness and low-blood pressure and may outweigh its benefits for some women.

But after an afternoon of emotional testimony from women who suffer from low sexual desire, the majority of committee members said that, with proper warning labels and education, the drug should be made available to women who now have nothing.

Studies have shown that the drug works better than placebo to boost women’s sexual desire, increased the number of sexually satisfying events and lowered women’s distress at the loss of their libido.

Bottom Line: The jury is not out on flibanserin but it certainly is a move by the pharmaceutical industry that recognizes that it takes two to tango and women should be included in the intimacy equation.

Do Women Have Low T? The Role Of Testosterone in Women

July 28, 2014

Testosterone is the male hormone produced in the testicles that is responsible for sex drive or libido. Women also make testosterone in their ovaries. After menopause the amount of testosterone is decreased and will affect a woman’s sex drive and libido.
Testosterone, widely and misleadingly understood to be the “male” hormone. Men produce 10 times more testosterone than women, but in their early reproductive years women have 10 times more testosterone than estrogen coursing through their bodies. And many experts now believe that it’s the loss of testosterone, and not estrogen, that causes women in midlife to tend to gain weight, feel fatigue and lose mental focus, bone density and muscle tone — as well as their libido. Testosterone is a woman’s most abundant biologically active hormone. Adequate levels of testosterone are necessary for physical and mental health in both sexes.



Benefits for Women
 
Women, before, during and past menopause, and sometimes as early as in their mid-30s, invariably have low testosterone levels. Not all women will experience its wide variety of symptoms, like low libido, hot flashes, fatigue, mental fogginess and weight gain. For those who do, and who seek to avoid taking synthetic oral hormones (shown by National Institutes of Health findings to pose an increased risk for breast cancer, heart attack, stroke, blood clots and dementia), bioidentical testosterone (whose molecular structure is the same as natural testosterone) has been shown to be safe and effective.

Some testosterone is converted by the body into estrogen — which partly explains why it is useful in treating menopausal symptoms. For those at high risk for breast cancer, or who have had it, that conversion can be prevented by combining testosterone with anastrozole — an aromatase inhibitor that prevents conversion to estrogen. Nonetheless, testosterone has been shown to beneficial for patients with breast cancer. Preliminary data presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology have shown that, in combination with anastrozole, testosterone was effective in treating symptoms of hormone deficiency in breast cancer survivors, without an increased risk of blood clots, strokes or other side effects of the more widely used oral estrogen-receptor modulators tamoxifen and raloxifene.

Other benefits cited for testosterone therapy include:

Relieving symptoms of menopause, like hot flashes, vaginal dryness, incontinence and urinary urgency.

Enhancing mental clarity and focus. Researchers at Utrecht University in Holland recently found that testosterone appears to encourage “rational decision-making, social scrutiny and cleverness.”

Reducing anxiety, balancing mood and relieving depression combined with fatigue. Dr. Stephen Center, a family practitioner in San Diego who has treated women with testosterone for 20 years, says the regimen consistently delivers “improvement in self-confidence, initiative and drive.”

Increasing bone density, decreasing body fat and cellulite, and increasing lean muscle mass. Testosterone is the best remedy available for eliminating midlife upper-arm batwings.

Offering protection against cardiovascular events, by increasing blood flow and dilating blood vessels, and against Type 2 diabetes, by decreasing insulin resistance.

Countering the Myths

Some women believe, also incorrectly, that testosterone therapy will produce “masculinizing” traits, like hoarseness and aggression. While the hormone may cause inappropriate hair growth and acne in some women, those side effects can be remedied by lowering the dose.

Testosterone therapy has been approved for a variety of conditions in women as well as men in Britain and Australia. But while the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved of testosterone for use in men whose natural levels are low, the agency has not sanctioned it for women, for any reason.

How Treatment Works

Women can take testosterone as a cream, through a patch or in the form of pellet implants, which have the highest consistency of delivery. Synthesized from yams or soybeans, and compounded of pure, bioidentical testosterone, the pellets, each slightly larger than a grain of rice, are inserted just beneath the skin in the hip in a one-minute outpatient procedure. They dissolve slowly over three to four months, releasing small amounts of testosterone into the blood stream, but speeding up when needed by the body — during strenuous activities, for example — and slowing down during quiet times, a feature no other form of hormone therapy can provide.

To determine a patient’s dosage, some doctors measure testosterone levels in the blood.

Side effects of the insertion procedure, which are rare, include infection, minor bleeding and the pellet working its way out or being extruded. Some patients notice improvements within a day or two; others do not perceive benefits for a couple of weeks.

Bottom Line: Since implantation is a surgical procedure, and the pellets are manufactured by a variety of pharmaceutical compounders, who may have varying safety standards, it’s important for women to consult with an experienced, board-certified physician about treatment. Ask your doctor if you feel you are having symptoms related to low testosterone and see if testosterone replacement would be right for you

At Last: Viagra For Women

June 1, 2014

Drug makers are testing new drugs that may be able to increase sexual desire in women.
A drug to boost female sex drive could be worth billions to the first company that manages to get it approved by the FDA. Recently, two new treatments have made strides towards that goal. But some are skeptical of the real value of such a drug to the women it’s supposed to help.
In late 2004, FDA approval of Intrinsa, a testosterone patch for low female sex drive, seemed imminent. News reports heralded Intrinsa as a “Viagra for her,” suggesting that it would revolutionize sexual health for women just as erectile dysfunction pills had for men.

Except an FDA advisory panel saw things differently. Finding numerous problems with the evidence for the drug’s effectiveness and safety, experts on the panel voted against approving it. Procter & Gamble, the company responsible for Intrinsa, withdrew its application. Now the frontrunner in the race to market the first prescription drug for low female sex drive is Boehringher-Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals. It has a drug called flibanserin in phase III clinical trials, the final phase of drug testing required for FDA approval. The company is a WebMD sponsor.
Flibanserin is a bit mysterious. It is a kind of antidepressant, but it hasn’t been approved previously for any use. Boehringher-Ingelheim is saying little publicly about the drug. At the moment we are not sure how the drug works or what is the mechanism of action of flibanserin.
Another drug, called bremelanotide, is in development for low female sex drive and male erectile dysfunction. Both potential uses are being tested in clinical trials, which are early studies to assess how well a drug works and how safe it is.
Bremelanotide is a new chemical created in the laboratory. It’s given in the form of a nasal spray, and it acts on the central nervous system.
Bottom Line: Stay tuned as a pill for women suffering from sexual dysfunction may be just around the corner at a pharmacy near you.

New Agent for Female Sexual Dysfunction Has Promise

May 2, 2014

Female sexual dysfunction, decreased sex drive, decreased vaginal lubrication, and lack of orgasm, is more common than male sexual dysfunction or erectile dysfunction. Unfortunately, until recently no treatment has been found to be effective for female sexual dysfunction.

A new drug, bremelanotide, appeared to reduce distress and increase satisfaction among premenopausal women with female sexual dysfunction, researchers reported here.

In a study that specifically looked at decreased sexual desire reported that treatment with bremelanotide resulted in women boosting the number of satisfactory sexual events in a month.

Patients taking bremelanotide reported more nausea, flushing, and headaches than those on placebo. About 10% of the woman using bremelanotide withdrew from the study because of adverse events, but the drug was generally well tolerated.

Bremelanotide is now awaiting approval from the FDA.

Bottom Line: Female sexual dysfunction affects millions of women. Until now little could be done to help women regain their desire for intimacy. The FDA is now looking into the use of bremelanotide as a solution for this common problem.

Sex Drive In The Tank? DHEA Is An Option

February 13, 2013

Women with a decreased sex drive or decreased libido now have treatments that can restore their interest and enthusiasm for sexual intimacy. Options include testosterone, yes the hormone produced in the testicles of men, but also produced in small amounts in women and is responsible for a women’s sex drive. Testosterone is available in pills, lozenges, patches, gels injections, and small rice-sized pellets inserted underneath the skin. Although there are advantages and disadvantages to each, most gynecologists and urologists will not prescribe pills, which can increase the risk of liver toxicity and lower levels of HDL (the “good” cholesterol).

A slightly “milder” alternative to testosterone is DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone). This steroid hormone is converted to testosterone. Supplementary DHEA, which is available in pill or cream form, increases testosterone levels by one-and-a-half to two times. So it’s not surprising that DHEA provides many of the same therapeutic benefits, including increased sexual interest and enhanced physical and mental satisfaction.

If you think you might be a candidate for testosterone therapy, here’s what to do:
Have your testosterone, DHEA and estrogen levels measured. Normal concentrations of testosterone range from between 25 and 100 nanograms per milliliter of blood.
Eat a well-balanced diet to stabilize your hormones Fiber and foods rich in minerals, such as potassium and magnesium can help balance hormones. Tofu, tempeh and other soy products are excellent sources of phytoestrogens, plant compounds that behave like mild estrogens in the body, helping relieve menopausal symptoms. Other sources of phytoestrogens include apples, alfalfa, cherries, potatoes, rice, wheat and yams. A diet rich in fruits and vegetables will also help maintain optimal health as you transition into menopause.
If you begin androgen therapy, be sure to report any side effects, such as acne, deepening of your voice, go to your doctor so he or she can monitor your progress and decrease your dosage as necessary.

Bottom Line: Although it is not for everyone, emerging research may reveal androgen to be one of the most promising therapies available to menopausal women. Sexuality and vitality need not be passing pleasures of youth.

This was modified from “Testosterone: A Major Breakthrough for Menopausal Women”. This article appeared in Fit & Health and can be accessed at: http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/women/menopause/testosterone-major-breakthrough-for-menopausal-women5.htm

Female Sexual Dysfunction-Women, You Can Be Helped

January 20, 2013

It is of interest that women have just as many sexual problems as men. In the past 15 years, more attention has been given to male sexual problems, mostly erectile dysfunction, as medications have been available for treating this common condition. Now women with decreased desire, decreased lubrication, decrased aroiusal, and lack of orgasm can now be treated.

What Causes Sexual Dysfunction?

Sexual dysfunction in women can be a result of a physical and\or psychological problem.

Physical causes. Many physical and/or medical conditions can cause problems with sexual function. These conditions include diabetes, heart disease, neurological diseases, hormonal imbalances, menopause plus such chronic diseases as kidney disease or liver failure, and alcoholism or drug abuse. In addition, the side effects of certain medications, including some antidepressant drugs, can affect sexual desire and function.
Psychological causes. These include work-related stress and anxiety, concern about sexual performance, marital or relationship problems, depression, feelings of guilt, or the effects of a past sexual trauma.

The most common problems related to sexual dysfunction in women include:

Inhibited sexual desire. This involves a lack of sexual desire or interest in sex. Many factors can contribute to a lack of desire, including hormonal changes associated with menopause, medical conditions and treatments (for example, cancer and chemotherapy), depression, pregnancy, stress, and fatigue. Boredom with regular sexual routines also may contribute to a lack of enthusiasm for sex, as can lifestyle factors, such as careers and the care of children.
Inability to become aroused. For women, the inability to become physically aroused during sexual activity often involves insufficient vaginal lubrication. This inability also may be related to anxiety or inadequate stimulation.
Lack of orgasm. An absence of orgasm can be caused by a woman’s sexual inhibition, inexperience, lack of knowledge, and psychological factors such as guilt, anxiety, or a past sexual trauma or abuse. Other factors contributing to an absent orgasm include insufficient stimulation, certain medications, and chronic diseases.
Painful intercourse. Pain during intercourse can be caused by pelvic organ prolapse, endometriosis, a pelvic mass, ovarian cysts, vaginitis, poor lubrication, the presence of scar tissue from surgery, or a sexually transmitted disease. A condition called vaginismus is a painful, involuntary spasm of the muscles that surround the vaginal entrance. It may occur in women who fear that penetration will be painful and also may stem from a sexual phobia or from a previous traumatic or painful experience.

The diagnosis of female sexual dysfunction begins with a physical exam and a thorough evaluation of symptoms. The doctor performs a pelvic exam to evaluate the health of the reproductive organs and a Pap smear to detect changes in the cells of the cervix (to check for cancer or a pre-cancerous condition).

An evaluation of your attitudes regarding sex, as well as other possible contributing factors (such as fear, anxiety, past sexual trauma/abuse, relationship problems, or alcohol or drug abuse) will help the doctor understand the underlying cause of the problem and make appropriate treatment recommendations.

Treatment of Female Sexual Dysfunction

Most types of sexual problems can be corrected by treating the underlying physical or psychological problems which include:

Providing education. Education about human anatomy, sexual function, and the normal changes associated with aging, as well as sexual behaviors and appropriate responses, may help a woman overcome her anxieties about sexual function and performance.
Enhancing stimulation. This may include the use of erotic materials (videos or books), masturbation, and changes in sexual routines.
Providing distraction techniques. Erotic or non-erotic fantasies; exercises with intercourse; music, videos, or television can be used to increase relaxation and eliminate anxiety.
Encouraging non-coital behaviors. Non-coital behaviors (physically stimulating activity that does not include intercourse), such as sensual massage, can be used to promote comfort and increase communication between partners.
Minimizing pain. Using sexual positions that allow the woman to control the depth of penetration may help relieve some pain. Vaginal lubricants can help reduce pain caused by friction, and a warm bath before intercourse can help increase relaxation.

The success of treatment for female sexual dysfunction depends on the underlying cause of the problem. The outlook is good for dysfunction that is related to a treatable or reversible physical condition. Mild dysfunction that is related to stress, fear, or anxiety often can be successfully treated with counseling, education, and improved communication between partners.

Hormones play an important role in regulating sexual function in women. With the decrease in the female hormone estrogen that is related to aging and menopause, many women experience some changes in sexual function as they age, including poor vaginal lubrication and decreased genital sensation. Low levels of the male hormone testosterone also contribute to a decline in sexual arousal, genital sensation, and orgasm. Women can use a topical gel containing testosterone or receive a small pellet of testosterone, the size of a grain of rice, placed under the skin which can result in enhancement of their libido and sex drive.

Many women experience changes in sexual function after a hysterectomy (surgical removal of the uterus). These changes may include a loss of desire, and decreased vaginal lubrication and genital sensation. These problems may be associated with the hormonal changes that occur with the loss of the uterus. Furthermore, nerves and blood vessels critical to sexual function can be damaged during the surgery.

The loss of estrogen following menopause can lead to changes in a woman’s sexual functioning. Emotional changes that often accompany menopause can add to a woman’s loss of interest in sex and/or ability to become aroused. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) or vaginal lubricants may improve certain conditions, such as loss of vaginal lubrication and genital sensation, which can create problems with sexual function in women.

I think it is important to mention that some postmenopausal women report an increase in sexual satisfaction. This may be due to decreased anxiety over getting pregnant. In addition, postmenopausal woman often have fewer child-rearing responsibilities, allowing them to relax and enjoy intimacy with their partners.

Bottom Line: Many women experience a problem with sexual function from time to time. However, when the problems are persistent, they can cause distress for the women and her partner, and can have a negative impact on their relationship. If you consistently experience these problems, see your doctor for evaluation and treatment.

For more information on women’s health, I suggest my new book, What’s Going On Down There-Everything You Need To KnowAbout Your Pelvic Health. the book is available from Amazon.com

New book on women's health

New book on women’s health

Viagra For Women -A New Drug To Help Women Achieve An Orgasm

October 30, 2012

It seems a bit unfair that men have access to medications such as Viagra, Levitra, and Cialis to treat erectile dysfunction or impotence. There are also hormones that men can take if they have low testosterone and suffer from a decreased libido. But what about women who have decreased sex desire or decreased lubrication? Now there is a treatment for women who have sexual dysfunction.

There is a the spray that can boost the sex drive of one in three women. Tefina is a testosterone gel that is sprayed up the nose. Researchers say that the testosterone is then absorbed within minutes and will become effective two hours after it is administered for up to six hours.

Researchers said the drug will be taken in the context of sexual activity, but will produce no adverse testosterone-related side effects like bad skin, body or facial hair or a deepened voice.

Researchers say that Tefina will be used as needed and that the drug will be used with the intention that it will increase the occurrence of orgasm for pre-menopausal women with sexual dysfunction or anorgasmia.

I anticipate the treatment will work like Viagra for women. Rather than a long-term, therapy-based approach, this drug can be taken when a woman anticipates sexual activity. For women with low sexual interest, testosterone therapy not only improves sexual desire and arousal, but also enhances a woman’s ability to reach orgasm.

Up to a third of women are affected by life-long problem of difficulty achieving orgasm after ample sexual stimulation, researchers say that until now the only available treatments are psychotherapy and sex therapy.
The new drug would be most helpful for patients who say that sex has become a chore rather than a pleasurable experience.

It has been shown through many documented studies that women who report poor sexual functioning have lower wellbeing, despite not being depressed. Doctors have little to offer women who are experiencing an absence of orgasms, and this could be a breakthrough study for women who currently are frustrated by the lack of any treatment option
.
Clinical trials are taking place in the US and Canada and researchers are currently recruiting participants between the ages of 18 and 49 who experience an absence of orgasm to take part in clinical trials in Australia.

Bottom Line: Men have treatment options for the treatment of erectile dysfunction or impotence. On the horizon is a new treatment for women with sexual problems.

Prescription For Passion-Testosterone Use In Women

August 12, 2012

Roberta is a middle aged lady who has noted that her sex drive and interest in sex has been reduced to near zero. After watching the movie Hope Springs starring Meryl Streep, Roberta made the decision to go to her doctor and share her situation. She had a blood test that checked her testosterone level and found that she was running on empty. She received a small testosterone pellet under her skin and reports that her “sex light” has been flipped to the on position.
Testosterone is the most celebrated, feared and misunderstood of all human hormones. Our culture lauds this substance’s leading role in male virility and casts it as the villain in acts of violent crime. In truth, testosterone is neither miracle nor monster, but rather, a key player in the complex chemistry of human hormones. When balanced by other hormones, testosterone, also known as androgen, plays a lead role in the health and well-being of both sexes.

Testosterone is known for decades as a male hormone. Testosterone is also made in small amounts by a woman’s ovaries. Just like in a man, a woman’s testosterone is highest around age 20 and slowly declines till it is half as high in her 40s. Women taking testosterone may have more sexual thoughts, fantasies, sexual activity, and satisfaction from sexual intimacy.

At the present time testosterone is not an FDA approved treatment used to raise a woman’s sexual interest, arousal, and satisfaction. Testosterone is available by using a skin patch, gel, cream, or a pellet inserted under the skin as I described for Roberta. Many supplements and herbal medicines, such as DHEA, may interact with testosterone. Be sure to tell your doctor about any nonprescription medicines, supplements, or herbs you are taking before receiving testosterone replacement therapy.
Women with low testosterone levels who might benefit from low-dose testosterone therapy include those who:
▪ Have had their ovaries removed. This causes a sudden drop in testosterone, which may decrease sex drive and satisfaction.
▪ Have a low sex drive that does not seem to be caused by a medicine, nor by relationship or stress-related problems.

Testosterone should be avoided in women who could become pregnant, have or have had breast or uterine cancer, have high cholesterol or heart disease or have liver disease.

Like nearly every medication, testosterone use in women has side effects especially if excessive testosterone is used. You are taking a dose that is too high if you have acne or oily skin, male-pattern hair growth on the face and body, anger and hostility problems, shrinking breast size, hoarseness or a deeper voice, irregular menstrual cycles, if you have been menstruating, or an increase in the size of your clitoris.
Bottom Line: Testosterone is also a necessary hormone for women just as it is for men but at a much lower dosage. Testosterone replacement can be a boon for women with a low sex desire, decrease in fantasies, and decrease enjoyment from sexual intimacy. See you doctor, get your testosterone level checked and if it is decreased, talk to your doctor about receiving testosterone replacement.
For those who want even more information I suggest Dr. Susan Rako’s book, “The Hormone of Desire: The Truth About Sexuality, Menopause and Testosterone.”