Archive for the ‘gynecomastia’ Category

Breast Cancer-Not Just A Problem for Women

May 8, 2012

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women. However, men are not immune to this problem although it is far more common in women. Many people do not realize that men have breast tissue and that they can develop breast cancer. Breast cancer is about 100 times less common among men than among women.
The prognosis (outlook) for men with breast cancer was once thought to be worse than that for women, but recent studies have not found this to be true. In fact, men and women with the same stage of breast cancer have a fairly similar outlook for survival.

The most obvious difference between the male and female breast is size. Because men have very little breast tissue, it is easier for men and their health care professionals to feel small masses (tumors). On the other hand, because men have so little breast tissue, cancers do not need to grow very far to reach the nipple, the skin covering the breast, or the muscles underneath the breast. So even though breast cancers in men tend to be slightly smaller than in women when they are first found, they have more often already spread to nearby tissues or lymph nodes. The extent of spread is one of the most important factors in the prognosis (outlook) of a breast cancer.

Another difference is that breast cancer is common among women and rare among men. Women tend to be aware of this disease and its possible warning signs. Women perform self exams on a regular basis and also obtain mammograms every year. However, most men do not realize they have even a small risk of being affected. Some men ignore breast lumps or think they are caused by an infection or some other reason, and they do not get medical treatment until the mass has had a chance to grow. Because breast cancer is so uncommon in men, there is unlikely to be any benefit in screening men in the general population for breast cancer.

Men need to know that breast cancer is not limited to only women. Possible signs of breast cancer to watch for include: A lump or swelling, which is usually (but not always) painless, skin dimpling or puckering, nipple retraction (turning inward), redness or scaling of the nipple or breast skin, or discharge from the nipple
These changes aren’t always caused by cancer. For example, most breast lumps in men are due to gynecomastia (a harmless enlargement of breast tissue). Still, if you notice any breast changes, you should see your health care professional as soon as possible.
Treatment

Most of the information about treating male breast cancer comes from doctors’ experience with treating female breast cancer. Because so few men have breast cancer, it is hard for doctors to study the treatment of male breast cancer patients separately in clinical trials.
Local therapy is intended to treat a tumor at the site without affecting the rest of the body. Surgery and radiation therapy are examples of local therapies. Systemic therapy refers to drugs, which can be given by mouth or directly into the bloodstream to reach cancer cells anywhere in the body. Chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and targeted therapy are systemic therapies.

The prognosis (outlook) for men with breast cancer was once thought to be worse than that for women, but recent studies have not found this to be true. In fact, men and women with the same stage of breast cancer have a fairly similar outlook for survival.

Bottom Line: Breast cancer can occur in men as well as women. While not as common in men as in women, men need to know that any lumps, swelling or discharge from the nipple should be examined by a physician.

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