Archive for the ‘testicle cancer’ Category

Owner Maintenance Suggestions For Men

May 2, 2015

June is Male Health Awareness Month. These are a few tests that are unique for men I suggest that they have these tests on a regular basis in order to maintain good health.

TESTICULAR SELF-EXAM

Testicular cancer is a young person’s disease. Please pay close attention to this section if you are between the ages of 15 and 40.

There’s a lot of media coverage for women getting regular mammograms and doing breast self-exams. Men need to examine their testicles as well.

Once a month, after you take your shower, roll each testicle around between your thumb and first two fingers. Look for any bumps, changes, hardness, heaviness, or an enlargement of the entire testicle. Also be on the lookout for changes in the skin of the scrotum. If you detect any of those changes, see a urologist and get it checked out.

PROSTATE CHECKUPS

It is unusual to find prostate cancer in men under the age of 50, but many men will have a diagnosis of prostate cancer by the time they are 70. For a lot of those men who are first diagnosed with prostate cancer after the age of 70, the cancer will grow very slowly and may not require treatment. The doctor will monitor the cancer with regular PSA and digital rectal exams to make sure it stays contained. Many men can live a healthy life with the diagnosis, but for some it can grow very quickly, spread beyond the prostate, and be life threatening. Nearly one-fifth of all men in the United States will eventually receive a diagnosis of prostate cancer, and many more may have prostate cancer because it goes undetected in men who show no symptoms. 3% of men with prostate cancer will die from the disease.

DRE: Digital Rectal Exam

The prostate gland can be physically checked to see if there might be cause for concern about cancer even when the patient has no symptoms. The Digital Rectal Exam is inexpensive, indicator of bumps or abnormal areas on the prostate gland, and you receive the results right after the examination. I suggest a DRE with every year between the ages of 50 and 80. The doctor can tell if your prostate is unusually large. This will tell you if the prostate is pressing against the bladder and causing frequent urination. Because of the mild discomfort of the DRE, it’s sometimes difficult to have men have the exam.

PSA Test

I know there is controversy over the PSA test, which is a blood test that measures the level of a protein produced by the cells of the prostate gland when there is cancer—and sometimes when there is no cancer. In other words, the PSA Test sometimes has “false positives.” But by giving you both tests annually or every other year, your doctor can get a good idea of the likelihood that you might have a problem, and then you can discuss how serious the problem might be and what you can do about it.

Prevention of prostate cancer

I am also asked what can men do to prevent prostate cancer or if they have prostate cancer is there a diet that helps control prostate cancer. Evidence shows that the risk of prostate cancer is reduced by a diet that is lower in red meat, fat, and dairy products and higher in fruits and vegetables—especially broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, bok choy and kale (all the cruciferous vegetables)—plus tomatoes. Such a diet, along with limiting alcohol consumption, maintaining an exercise program, and keeping body weight down, is associated with a lower risk of prostate cancer and other cancers as well.

Bottom Line: Men need to be involved in their healthcare. These few tests and suggestions are just a few suggestions that all men can and should do.

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What Every Woman Should Know….About Her Man

November 26, 2014

Men live 5-7 years less than women and often have poorer health than their female counterparts. This may be due to many factors but certainly one is that men seek out preventive healthcare much less often than women. This blog is intended to give you an overview of the unique healthcare problems of men and what women can do to help their men lead happier and healthier lives.

ED\Impotence
ED is a common condition that affects as many as 30 million American men. Most men are uncomfortable discussing their sexual problems with either their partners or their healthcare providers. As a result men feel embarrassed and women often feel that the man in their life doesn’t find them attractive.

About 70% of the time, ED is caused by an underlying health problem, most often diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, or heart disease. The remaining 30% of men suffer from ED caused by stress, anxiety, depression, the side effects of medication, or drug and alcohol abuse.

In most cases, ED is treatable, which means that it doesn’t have to be a natural or inevitable part of growing older. Treatments include drug therapy (Cialis, Levitra, or Viagra) vacuum devices, injections, or penile implants. If your partner is suffering from ED, encourage him to seek medical care as certainly this condition can be effectively treated.

Testosterone
Testosterone is one of the most important hormones for the normal growth and development of male sex and reproductive organs. It is responsible for the development of male characteristics such as body and facial hair, muscle growth and strength, and deep voice.

Men’s testosterone levels naturally decrease as men age. But if the levels drop below the normal range, some uncomfortable and often distressing symptoms may develop, including:
Decreased libido or sex drive
Importance or ED
Depression
Fatigue or loss of energy
Loss of muscle mass

As many as 10 million men suffer from low testosterone (low T) but only 5% are being treated.

The diagnosis is made with a simple blood test that measures the blood level of testosterone. If the T level is decreased and the man has symptoms of low T, then replacement therapy with injections, topical gels, or pellets can be prescribed.

Prostate
The prostate is a walnut-sized gland that manufactures fluid for semen. It is located at the base of the bladder and surrounds the urethra or the tube that transports urine from the bladder through the penis to the outside of the body.

Prostatitis is a condition often caused by a bacterial infection or an inflammatory response similar to that seen with allergies and asthma. Symptoms may include a discharge, discomfort, pain in the area underneath the scrotum or testicles, frequent urination, and burning with urination. Treatment usually consists of medication and medications t decrease the inflammatory response in the prostate gland.

Benign prostate gland enlargement affects most men after age 50. The symptoms consist of frequent urination, getting up at night to urinate, and a decrease in the force and the caliber of the urine stream. Treatment consists of oral medication to reduce the size of the prostate gland, or medication that can relax the prostate and improve the urine flow. Now there are minimally invasive treatments such as microwaves, lasers, and even a new treatment, UroLift, that pins open the prostate gland in a 15 minute procedure in an outpatient setting.

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. Nearly 240,000 new cases are diagnosed every year and causes 30,000 deaths each year making it the second most common cause of death due to cancer in men. The diagnosis is made by a digital rectal exam and a blood test, PSA test. If prostate cancer is caught early, it is often curable and nearly always treatable.

In the early stages, prostate cancer usually causes NO symptoms. However, as the disease progresses, so do the symptoms such as hip or back pain, difficulty with urination, painful or burning on urination or blood in the urine.

Every man should consider a baseline PSA test and a digital rectal examination at age 40. Additionally, African Americans and men with a family history of prostate cancer see a physician annually beginning at age 40.

Treatment options for prostate cancer include surgical removal of the prostate gland, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, immunotherapy or cryosurgery. Some men with localized, low risk prostate cancer might select active surveillance or watchful waiting which closes monitors the cancer to see if it progresses or becomes aggressive. If the cancer progresses, then treatment is usually instituted.

Testicular cancer
Cancer of the testicle is the most common cancer in men between the ages of 15-35. Although, there is nothing to prevent testicular cancer, if the cancer is diagnosed early, there is a high cure rate. Early detection is the key to success.

Symptoms of testicle cancer include:
Lumps or enlargement of either testicle
A feeling of pulling or unusual weight in the scrotum
Pain or discomfort in the testicle or scrotum
Dull ache in the lower abdomen
Enlargement or tenderness of the breasts

The best way to diagnose testicle cancer is be doing a testicle self-examination. Men\boys should examine themselves once a month just as women are recommended to do a monthly breast self examination. If a man experiences a lump or bump on the testicle or in the scrotum, contact your physician as soon as possible.

So what do I recommend?
In your 20s
A physical examination every three years
Check blood pressure every year
Screening for cancers of the thyroid, testicles, lymph nodes, mouth, and skin every three years
Cholesterol test every three years
Testicular self-exam every month

In your 30s
All of the above and a physical exam every two years

In your 40s
A physical exam every two years
A PSA test and a digital rectal exam if you are in a high-risk group
A stool test for colon and rectal cancer every year

At age 50 and above
A colonoscopy every 5 years or as recommended by your physician
A PSA and digital rectal exam every year

Bottom Line: Women can be so helpful in guiding men to good health. If you love your man, encourage him to follow these guidelines.

In the next blog we will discuss what men need to know about women’s health.