Archive for the ‘testosterone gel’ Category

Recent Study Does Not Indicate Testosterone Use Doesn’t Increase Heart Risk

July 7, 2014

A few months ago an article appeared in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) that implicated testosterone as a cause of heart disease and stroke. But critics including several hundred physicians have attacked the study noting that among other things, the study including over 100 women among the 1,132 subjects studied. Over 25 international medical groups have demanded that JAMA retract the article.

A new study now points out that testosterone therapy didn’t increase the risk of heart attack, contrary to the JAMA study, and that it even lowered the risk of heart attack by about 30%.
In the latest study, published online in the Annals of Pharmacotherapy, researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch used a national Medicare sample and compared the records of 6,355 men who had at least one testosterone injection between 1997 and 2005, with 19,065 non-testosterone users. The testosterone users were no more likely to have a myocardial infarction than the nonusers during the period, according to the study.

The researchers also ranked the subjects based on their predicted risk of heart attack for other reasons. For men in the quarter with the highest risk, the use of testosterone cut that risk by roughly 30%.

The latest study only at men receiving testosterone injections, not those using pills, patches or gels, and couldn’t assess what other medications the men were taking. Men typically lose testosterone as they age, and some conditions can cause a steep drop in levels earlier, leading to osteoporosis which increases the risk of hip and spine fractures, sexual dysfunction, loss of muscle tone, fatigue, diabetes and other health problems. Proponents say restoring normal levels can alleviate those issues.

Bottom Line: Testosterone deficiency or low T affects millions of American men. The diagnosis is easily made with a history of decreased libido, decreased sexual performance, loss of muscle mass and loss of energy or fatigue. The diagnosis is easily made with a simple blood test and can be helped with testosterone replacement therapy. For more information on testosterone deficiency speak to your doctor.

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Caution On Use of Testosterone-Don’t Let Partner and Children Touch The Application Site

April 11, 2014

Testosterone is recommended for millions of American men with low T. These men report significant improvement in their symptoms of low T such as improved energy level, improvement in libido and erections, improved bone mineral density thus preventing osteoporosis in men. However, there are some precautions regarding the use of testosterone topical gels, which is the most used method of testosterone replacement. Testosterone left on the skin that is not absorbed can be transferred to your partner or your children if they come in contact with the application site.

If you are using topical testosterone gels, you should avoid contact between the applications sites and the skin of your partner and children.

To minimize the risk of testosterone gel transfer, men should wash the exposed area thoroughly before allowing direct, skin-to-skin contact. I also suggest than men wash their hands with soap and water immediately AFTER application of the gel. However, subsequent skin-to-skin exposure to the application site can still lead to transfer of testosterone from the man using the topical gel to others.

I also suggest that men be instructed to wear a T-shirt over the application site if the gel is applied to the abdomen and\or upper shoulders to prevent inadvertent testosterone transfer.

Men using topical gels should watch carefully for signs of testosterone transfer to partners and children.

Signs of testosterone in little boys include increased public hair, penile enlargement and accelerated bone growth. Other symptoms in both boys and girls include deepening of the voice, overactive oil gland in the skin leading to acne, increased body odor, increased muscle mass, frequent erections and masturbation, as well as behavioral changes.

In women the signs of testosterone transfer toxicity may include growth of hair on the face, male pattern baldness, irregular menses, enlargement of the clitoris, and deepening of the voice.

Bottom Line: Testosterone from accidental exposure from the topical gel from the man to his partner or children places the women or children to the deleterious effects of testosterone in women and\or children. The best advice for protection of partners and children is for the man to wash his hands after applying the gel and covering the application sites with a T-shirt or underclothing.