Archive for the ‘testostertone replacment therapy’ Category

There’s More To Testosterone Replacement Than Meets the Eye

February 9, 2017

Today, it is very common for middle aged men to have symptoms of low testosterone.  Many times these men will complain of decreased libido and decrease in their erections.  The treatment is hormone replacement therapy.  In addition to improving your libido, there are other advantages to hormone replacement therapy.  This blog will discuss the other benefits of testosterone replacement therapy.

Breast Formation. Male breast formation, also known as gynecomastia, is a source of anxiety for most men when they start to sprout. Men can form breasts during infancy, adolescence, old age, or anywhere in between. It all start with lowered testosterone and increased estrogen levels. Male breasts can be reduced or removed through gynecomastia surgery, but in other cases a simple adjustment of body sex hormone levels may be enough to provide the change desired.

Bone Density. Men start to lose bone mass as testosterone levels go south.  The same thing happens to women (though by a different mechanism), and typically starts to be noticed during old age. However, the groundwork for bone strength  starts in young adulthood, when your body starts to store calcium that will last for the rest of your life. If you don’t have sufficient testosterone, you can’t form bones that are strong enough to last until you die. Get tested for testosterone now to learn about how your health will be as you age.

Libido and Sexual Development. Testosterone has an enormous impact on secondary sex characteristics like body hair, but it’s absolutely central to sexual desire and performance. If you are having trouble with sexual intimacy, you may need to get checked for testosterone. Many men have seen improvement that changes their lives for the better after getting testosterone replacement therapy, without ever having to resort to pills for erections like Viagra, Levitra, Cialis.

Red Blood Cell Formation. Red blood cells are necessary for oxygen transportation in the body.  Testosterone increases the red blood cell production.  However, it is important to check the red blood cell count every 4-6 months if you are using testosterone replacement therapy as too high a level of red blood cells can be harmful.  Therefore, it is imperative to have a testosterone level, a PSA test (a screening test for prostate cancer), and a red blood cell count on a regular basis if you are using testosterone replacement options.

Bottom Line:  If you are middle age and complain of lethargy, weakness, loss of muscle mass, and alternation of your moods, then you may have testosterone deficiency.  The diagnosis is easily made with a simple blood test.  Treatment consists of injections, topical gels, patches and even small rice-sized pellets inserted under the skin.  For more information speak to your doctor.

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Latest News on Testosterone-NBC Nightly News on 2\17\16

February 17, 2016

Testosterone gel can help some men get back a little of their loving feelings, and helps them feel better in general, according to a new study published today by the National Institute of Health.

It’s the first study in years to show any benefit for testosterone therapy. This was the first time that a trial demonstrated that testosterone treatment of men over 65 who have low testosterone would benefit them in any way.  The trial showed that testosterone treatment of these men improved their sexual function, their mood, and reduced depressive symptoms—and perhaps also improved walking.

The FDA does not approve the use of testosterone to treat the effects of aging. But it’s already a $2 billion industry, with millions of men buying gel, pills or getting injections.

Experts stress that the results, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, only apply to men over 65 who have medically diagnosed low testosterone. The trial consisted of 800 men.

A few men had heart attacks or were diagnosed with prostate cancer during the study, but the rate were the same in men who got real hormone and in those who got placebo cream.

Men in the testosterone group were more likely than those in the placebo group to report that their sexual desire had improved since the beginning of the trial. Men who received testosterone reported better sexual function, including activity, desire, and erectile function, than those who received placebo. Although the effect sizes were low to moderate, men in the testosterone group were more likely than those in the placebo group to report that their sexual desire had improved.

Testosterone was also associated with small but significant benefits with respect to mood and depressive symptoms. Men in the testosterone group were also more likely than those in the placebo group to report that their energy was better.

As men age, their bodies make less testosterone. It’s not as sudden as when women lose estrogen, but the effects can be similar – loss of energy, sexual desire, depression and bone loss.

Bottom Line: Testosterone is the male hormone responsible for sex drive, erections, bone strength, muscle mass, and even mood.  The hormone decreases starting in men in their 20’s and usually become symptomatic in the late 40s and 50s.  The diagnosis is easily made with a simple blood test and treatment is easily accomplished with injections, topical gels, or pellets inserted underneath the skin.  For more information speak to your doctor.

Testosterone, Depression, and SSRI’s or Anti-Depressants-What’s the Connection?

December 21, 2015

Many people that take antidepressants, specifically SSRI’s (selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitors), find out that they have abnormally low testosterone. So what does this all mean? Did the initial low testosterone lead the individual to become depressed and go on an antidepressant? Or did the treatment with an antidepressant actually slowly reduce the individual’s natural ability to produce testosterone?

It really is a “chicken vs. egg” type argument in regards to whether low T caused depression or an antidepressant caused low T. Unfortunately there is no clear-cut scientific answer as to whether the antidepressant you took caused your testosterone to be lowered.

With that said, new research comes out all the time finding new things about antidepressants (SSRI’s) – they really aren’t well understood. Many antidepressants medications are now linked to development of diabetes, birth defects, etc. Although there are no formal studies to link antidepressants with low testosterone, many people taking these drugs are convinced that they are the root cause.

It could have been that the lower testosterone was what caused the person to feel depressed in the first place. The low T could have also merely been a coincidence among those who are depressed – after all, having low T is a pretty common issue.

Antidepressants and Testosterone: Many people taking antidepressants experience low testosterone. Similarly, many people with low testosterone are taking antidepressants. These two factors could also occur independently. In other words a person may develop low testosterone while on an antidepressant without the antidepressant being the cause. 



Depression and Testosterone: Many people may be experiencing depression as a result of low testosterone. Similarly many people may be experiencing low testosterone as a result of depression. Additionally, these two factors could be totally unrelated and independent of each other. In other words the depression could have nothing to do with low T and vice versa.
Depression and sex drive – Many people with depression tend to have lower than average sex drives. It is the depression that is thought to lead to disinterest in pleasurable activities like sex. People may be in such a depressed, low level of arousal, that they don’t feel like having sex. Therefore in this case, it could be that the depression and not testosterone is causing reduced sexual interest.
Testosterone and sex drive – It is well known that healthy testosterone levels are linked with a healthy sex drive. Men that have low T tend to have less fuel for sex, erectile dysfunction, and other performance issues. If your testosterone level were to be lowered, the natural result would be a reduced sex drive. This reduced sex drive could be linked to depression – therefore testosterone could play a role.
Low testosterone causing depression? – Individuals with lower than average levels of testosterone could be experiencing depressive symptoms as a result of their low T. Studies have found that among men with abnormally low levels of T, testosterone therapy helped reduce symptoms of depression. For this reason it is important to rule out all causes of depression (including low T) before you get on an antidepressant.
Antidepressants and low testosterone – It is well documented that antidepressants can affect hormones. Therefore some hypothesize that hormonal changes can influence our sex drive. It is not known whether antidepressants are the culprit behind lowering levels of testosterone. Many people that have taken SSRI’s believe that the drugs they took lowered their testosterone.
Bottom Line: There is no question that there is a relationship between testosterone and depression. I cannot say for certain that low testosterone is a result of the use of SSRIs. However, if you are taking SSRIs and you are experience a low sex drive or libido, it is very easy to ask your doctor to obtain a blood testosterone test. If it is low, treatment is easily accomplished with either testosterone injections, topical gels or pellets.

Testosterone and the Prostate Gland

December 14, 2015

Many men suffer from hormone deficiency with symptoms of loss of libido, erectile dysfunction, loss of energy, loss of muscle and bone mass, and even depression.  These men with low levels of testosterone are helped with hormone replacement therapy using either injecitons of testosterone, topical tesotserone gels, or pellets of testosterone inserted under the skin.  Some men are concerend that the use of testosterone will icrease the risk of prostate cancer or cause them to have more urinary symptoms.

A recent review found little evidence to support that urinary symptoms would worsen as a result of using testosterone replacement therapy (TRT).

Furthermore, although the Endocrine Society and other associations have suggested severe LUTS as a contraindication to TRT treatment, investigators found little evidence to support it after reviewing the limited research.

The study showed that men with mild urinary symptoms such as getting up at night or having dribbling after urination experienced either no change or an improvement in their symptoms following TRT.

It is of interest that patients with metabolic syndrome (diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, and increase in abdominal fat) experienced symptomatic improvement after TRT.  The study even pointed out that men with the metabolic syndrome who received testosterone replacement therapy also had improvement in the underlying metabolic syndrome, i.e., lower blood pressure, lower cholesterol levels, and improvement in their control of their diabetes.

Bottom Line:  Testosterone is safe for men with mild urinary symptoms and may even help with reduction in urinary symptoms in some men.

Source:

Kathrins M, Doersch K, Nimeh T, Canto A, Niederberger C, and Seftel A. The Relationship Between Testosterone Replacement Therapy and Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms: A Systematic Review. Urology S0090-4295(15)01053-3. doi:10.1016/j.urology.2015.11.006.

Testosterone Deficiency – Natural Solutions For Testosterone Replacement

July 19, 2015

Around age 50 women have a drop in their hormones and enter into menopause. At about the same age men start experiencing a decrease in testosterone occurs. This is the male hormone that is responsible for sex drive, muscle mass, bone strength, and even erections. This condition in men is referred to as andropause and it affects millions of American men.

Treatment options include testosterone replacement with injections, topical gels, or pellets inserted underneath the skin. For those who have only mild symptoms such as lethargy or decrease in libido and slight decrease in the blood testosterone level, may consider natural solutions to this common problem.

Onions
Okay, while onion breath may not be sexy, onions strengthens reproductive organs and increases testosterone, which boosts libido in both men and women.

Garlic
Garlic contains allicin, which builds heat in the body and may increase testosterone. It’s useful for sexual stamina, and body builders use it for muscle growth.

Cayenne Pepper
Just like cayenne’s spicy on your tongue, it also may help add spice to your sex life. Hot peppers contain capsaicin, which creates heat and improves circulation and blood flow for erections. The peppers have an immediate effect, so try eating them when you’re for sexual intimacy. And maybe save dessert for later!

Dates
Dates are rich in amino acids , which are known to increase sexual stamina, and they’re a popular aphrodisiac in North African and has been used for sexual purposes for centuries.

Figs
Like dates, figs are rich in amino acids, and are also said to be an aphrodisiac because of the sexual appearance and flavor. A fig’s scent and texture is very aromatic and sensual.

Goji Berries
Goji berries have long been used as a sexual tonic in Asian countries because they’re said to increase testosterone. You can sprinkle these berries on your cereal, salads, or just eating a handful.

Fatty Fish
Salmon, tuna, and mackerel are high in omega-3 fatty acids, which elevates dopamine, the same hormone released in the brain during an orgasm. These omega-3 fatty acids also elevates mood, and more relaxed people are in the mood for sex more often. Fatty fish also contains L-arginine, an amino acid used to treat problems with erections. Think of it like a natural Viagra.

Bottom Line: Although none of these natural remedies will cure testosterone deficiency but they may help slow the progression of testosterone deficiency. And as my wise Jewish would say, “They may not help, but they voidn’t hoit!”