Posts Tagged ‘Addyi’

Woman Can Turn On Just Like Men-Addyi, Female Viagra

October 27, 2015

Women have been waiting for decades to catch up with men in the area of intimacy with their partners. Men have been fortunate that Viagra, Cialis, and Levitra have worked wonders for millions of American men. Today there is a female Viagra, called Addyi or flibanserin that is helping women with a decreased sexual desire.

Experts are calling Addyi, the so-called “female Viagra” that’s become the first-ever FDA-approved pill for hypoactive sexual desire disorder, a revolution for women’s sexual health.

The approval of Addyi is the most important advancement in female sexual health since the oral contraceptive was approved in 1960.

It validates women’s right to treatment for sexual problems and their right to sexual health. Let the truth be told that Addyi validates that there is as much biology as psychology with regard to women’s sexual function and this is the same for men.
Addyi also known as the “little pink pill,” doesn’t work the same way that Viagra does in men. Instead of affecting blood flow to the genitals, as Viagra does, Addyi targets certain serotonin receptors in the central nervous system within the brain —similar to how anti-depression medications target other receptors — in order to improve sexual desire.

Until Addyi there were no FDA-approved drugs that targeted low sexual desire in either men or women. The FDA’s approval of Addyi to the breakthrough in men’s sexual health research when Viagra was first approved in 1998. Before then, doctors told men that erectile dysfunction was all in their heads and the only treatment offered men was testosterone which was seldom effective. Now, in 2015, we accept that there are physical reasons such as diabetes, heart disease, and hundreds of medications that result in men not being able to obtain or sustain erections. Addyi’s introduction to the marketplace could do the same for the estimated 5.5 million to 8.6 million U.S. women suffering from hypoactive sexual desire disorder, meaning a chronic lack of interest in sex.

Addyi was originally formulated as an anti-depressant. While it failed to treat depression, researchers noticed that it did increase sexual desire. Sprout Pharmaceuticals then tested it for safety and effectiveness in more than 11,000 women before winning the recent FDA approval. In three randomized studies women who took Addyi had between one-half to one more satisfying sexual event per month on average than women who took placebo pills. It also increased sexual desire as compared to the placebo, as well as lowered distress related to sexual desire dysfunction.

Although the root causes of low sexual desire in women include relationship issues and changing hormone levels due to aging.

The drug’s side effects, which include severely low blood pressure and loss of consciousness if taken with alcohol, are comparable to the side effects of psychoactive medications that were able to win FDA approval far more easily than Addyi. The most common side effects were dizziness, sleepiness, nausea and fatigue, which is why the pill is recommended for use before bed.

Bottom Line: Women with decreased sexual desire now have a medication that may solve that problem. Addyi has now been approved by the FDA for the treatment of low sexual desire in women. For more information, speak to your physician.

Little Blue Pill (Viagra) For Men and Now A Little Pink Pill (Addyi) For Women

August 24, 2015

Now women with sexual dysfunction will have a solution to their problem with decrease in libido or sex drive. A 2002 study found that up to one-third of adult women might experience hypoactive sexual desire disorder, a technical term for when women lack sexual desire or fantasy.
Recently the FDA approved flibanserin, which will be sold as Addyi, for the treatment of sexual dysfunction in premenopausal women.
This is the first FDA approved treatment for sexual desire in men or women.

Today’s approval provides women distressed by their low sexual desire with an approved treatment option. The approval is not without warnings. In fact, the agency approved the drug with a risk warning to ensure safety. Of greatest concern, an increased risk of severe low blood pressure, so low it can cause a temporary loss of consciousness. This is more of a concern in patients who drink alcohol while taking the drug. The doctor will be required to warn patients of the risks of consuming alcohol while taking Addyi.

Addyi is frequently referred to as “female Viagra” because it’s a pill for sexual dysfunction in women. However, experts say it’s a misnomer to describe it as such because it works in a distinctly different way to target the brain.
Viagra treats erectile dysfunction, a physical problem, and does not induce sexual desire. Addyi works on the central nervous system, which is why it’s in the same category as an antidepressant.
Another difference is that men take Viagra as needed before a sexual encounter, and women will need to take Addyi once every night. Taking it at night will reduce the likelihood of adverse reactions from low blood pressure and sleepiness or depression from a depressed central nervous system.
Other common side effects include dizziness, nausea, fatigue, insomnia and dry mouth.
In clinical trials, women taking the drug experienced a 37% increase in sexual desire.

Addyi will cost about the same per month as a one month supply of Viagra for men.

Bottom Line: Nearly as many women as men suffer from sexual dysfunction. Addyi is the first drug to address this problem in women. However, women need to be cautious about the use of this new medication. For more information, speak to your physician.