Posts Tagged ‘aging’

Take Care of Yourself-How To Age Gracefully and Healthfully

March 24, 2015

We are living at a time of longevity. We can live longer and live better today than at any time in recorded history. It is possible with good health to live to 80,90, or even 100 years of age.

Start with setting a goal to live as long as you would like. Ask yourself, are you practicing habits today that will get you to that goal of your desired age.

The three areas that you need to keep in mind to achieve your goal.

1. Achieve an ideal weight. You need to get your weight under control. When you reach your ideal weight, make a commitment to remain at that level for the rest of your life. There should be no yo-yo of your weight but you must remain at the ideal weight for the rest of your life.

The best advice I have is to eat less and exercise more. The law of thermodynamics applies to weight loss. The law simply states the net heat supplied to the system equals the net work done by the system. Therefore, you need to consume fewer calories than you burn from exercise or you need to exercise harder and longer in order to burn more calories than you consume. There is no short cut. There are numerous websites that can help you with your diet and give you a ballpark on the caloric burning that takes place with every day exercises. (http://www.freedieting.com/tools/calorie_calculator.htm, http://calorielab.com/burned/, and http://www.myfitnesspal.com/exercise/lookup

2. Proper diet
Eat better quality foods and fewer of them. Eat more fruits, vegetables and good proteins such as lean meat, chicken, and fish. Eliminate soft drinks, deserts, candies and any other foods containing mostly sugar. Stop consuming extra salt. Eliminate any white flower products. Eat smaller portions and eat 4-6 times a day rather than 3 large meals. By taking control of your eating habits, you can take control of other areas of your life.

3. Exercise
A suggested exercise regimen is 200 minutes\week or 30 minutes a day. You can get all the exercise you need by going for a vigorous walk for 30-60 minutes 3 times a week.

You can even get exercise if you declare that you won’t take the elevator up the stairs or you can park your car 3-5 blocks further than your normal parking spot every day.

Bottom Line: set goals for your life regarding health and fitness and be disciplined to stick to those goals for the rest of your life. You need to make a daily plan and work your plan every day. This requires self-discipline but this self-discipline will help with the discipline you will need in other areas of your life.

Erectile Dysfunction Is Not Always an Affliction of Old Age

January 14, 2015

When you think of erectile dysfunction (ED), there are two assumptions that often come to mind: first, that ED only happens to old men and, second, that your sex life or appearance is to blame. I want to put both of these myths to rest. This blog will help you identify the cause of ED and what treatment options are available.

Recent research published in The Journal of Sexual Medicine found that one in four men seeking help for erectile dysfunction is younger than 40 [2]. What’s more, 50 percent of men over 50 are struggling with some variation of ED.

Men and their significant others would like to believe it’s all in their head, and women often put the blame on their sex life. Some women even wonder “if it’s me” or “is he having an affair?”—but these excuses are often never the cause.”

The actual culprit: his health and usually the blood supply to the penis.
Vasculogenic erectile dysfunction—which means his lack of erection is due to a blood flow issue, as opposed to erectile issues caused by neurological, psychological, or endocrinological complications—is a huge predictor for major health concerns like heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure or hypertension.

The arteries in the penis are just like the arteries all over the rest of the body such as to the heart, the brain, the kidneys, only those to the penis are significantly smaller. So if there is a blood flow issue happening at the level of the penis, perhaps to due to plaque buildup, then it’s only a matter of time before he starts noticing issues with his heart.

ED is really just the tip of the blood vessel iceberg when it comes to deteriorating health. So if man suffering from ED wants to treat the issue, some lifestyle changes will have to be made. Here’s are some suggestions:

See a men’s health specialist
Primary care doctors and urologists don’t always have familiarities with the penis and may not understand the physiology as much as they should. What’s more, a primary care doctor will likely just prescribe Viagra, Cialis, or Levitra—which ultimately does nothing for his overall health. The man using these drugs eventually builds a resistance to the pills and they do nothing to reverse the process affecting the decrease in blood supply to the penis and other vital organs.

Step up your physical activity
As couples get older and their schedules become more hectic, going for walks often become the primary source of exercise. And while walking may help relieve stress, it’s not going to improve ED. You really need to work up a sweat and get your heart pumping to improve your cardiovascular health. Transition some of your walks together into runs, and incorporate 2-3 strength-training sessions into your weekly routine. But remember walking is better than being a couch potato or no exercise at all.

Develop better eating habits
Abdomen fat is a big predictor of poor health. It’s a major red flag because it leads to ED, diabetes, high blood pressure, and issues with the heart, he adds. Simply put: if your partner’s diet consists of meat, potatoes, pretzels, chips and beer, this has to change. Spouses are often enablers of lifestyle changes, which is why the woman’s workout and eating habits matter to his ED improvement. So if you’re looking for a diet that promotes good heart health, it should be packed full with fish, fruits, and vegetables.

Bottom Line: ED is a common problem affecting over 30 million American men. Help is available. See a male health expert to find a solution and to treat other health-related problems affecting your heart and other vital organs.

Restoring The Fountain of Youth-DHEA Just May Be The Youth Hormone For Women

January 28, 2014

American women (men too) are always looking to find a way to turn back the biologic clock. We all would like to look like the women in Cosmopolitan and Vogue Magazines. If your goal is to look younger, feel better, and improve energy level, then you might consider the benefits of DHEA.

DHEA, dehydroepiandrosterone, is a hormone produced in the adrenal gland, the small triangular structure that sits on top of the kidneys. DHEA is made by the adrenal glands and is then converted to androgens, estrogens and other hormones. These are the hormones that regulate fat and mineral metabolism, sexual and reproductive function, and energy levels. DHEA levels increase until our mid to late 20′s then gradually decline. DHEA is a very powerful precursor to all of your major sex hormones: estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. (Its molecular structure is closely related to testosterone). DHEA is called the “mother hormone” — the source that fuels the body’s metabolic pathway.

When DHEA levels are low, your body does not have enough working material for proper endocrine function. This throws off your hormone production and you feel a general sense of malaise, along with other symptoms of hormonal imbalance — how severe depends on how many other demands are being made on your body at the same time.
There is a growing body of evidence that healthy levels of DHEA may help stave off Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, osteoporosis, depression, heart disease and obesity, but there is still no clear-cut consensus. There may be some increased risks associated with DHEA for women with a history of breast cancer — all the more reason to take DHEA under medical supervision.

Symptoms of low DHEA include extreme fatigue, decrease in muscle mass, decrease in bone density, depression, aching joints, loss of libido, and lowered immunity.
DHEA is stated to be possibly effective for these conditions:
1. Aging Skin – Taking DHEA orally seems to increase epidermal thickness, sebum production, skin hydration, and decrease facial skin pigmentation in elderly men and women
2. Osteoporosis – Taking DHEA orally 50-100 mg per day seems to improve bone mineral density (BMD) in older women and men with osteoporosis or osteopenia.
3. DHEA is also thought to contribute to a sense of well-being when used by those with adrenal and/or androgen insufficiency.
4. It may also support lean body mass in postmenopausal women.

DHEA has many potential benefits but does also have some side effects, which include hair loss, hair growth on the face (in women), aggressiveness, irritability and increased levels of estrogen. Calcium channel blockers may increase DHEA levels and those using calcium channel blockers should avoid supplementation. Anyone with a history of hormone-related cancer such as estrogen sensitive breast cancer should definitely avoid DHEA due to the probability of increased estrogen levels.

If you don’t feel DHEA is appropriate for you, it may be possible to increase the body’s natural production of DHEA with regular exercise and restricting the number of calories you consume. Calorie restriction is associated with a longer life span and the increase in DHEA production may be partially responsible. In fact, there are many studies that show you can improve your DHEA levels naturally by maintaining a body mass index of 19-25, getting adequate rest and exposure to sunlight, exercising regularly (including sexual activity), and fostering more “downtime” in your life — but more on that in a moment.

Without a medical test it’s impossible to know what your DHEA levels are. Using blood tests, your doctor can check for estradiol in the follicular phase (usually days 3–9 of a menstrual cycle); progesterone in the luteal phase (days 14–28); DHEA-S; and both free and total testosterone levels.
Treatment With DHEA Supplements

If tests indicate the need for DHEA supplementation, you may start off with as little as 1-5 mg, twice a day. The dosage can be slowly increased to 10–12 mg per day. Most doctors do not suggest any woman exceed 25 mg per day if capsule forms are used. Once balance has been restored and symptoms even out, most women produce enough DHEA on their own.

Bottom Line: Many women are suffering from hormone imbalance. Decreased DHEA can be a cause of many problems affecting middle age women and can even impact her libido and her energy levels. DHEA should never be taken casually or unsupervised, but its benefits are real for the women who need it.

Sex and The Male Senior Citizen

November 24, 2012

Couple in Love

Couple In Love


You are 60 years of age and you note that your erections are not as strong as there were at 40 years of age. It takes longer to get an erection than a decade ago and once you ejaculate it takes longer to get the next erection. Welcome, guys to the middle ages. These are normal consequences of aging for men. This doesn’t mean that you pack up your penis and never use it again. It means that you will use it differently than years ago.

What are the normal, expected changes in a man’s penis as he ages?

Appearance. There are two major changes. The head of the penis (glans) gradually loses its purplish color, the result of reduced blood flow. And there is a slow loss of pubic hair. You don’t have to worry about your manscape as nature will take care of your pubic hair for you.

Penis Size.
Weight gain is common as men grow older. As fat accumulates on the lower abdomen, the apparent size of the penis changes. A large clump of fat in the lower abdomen makes the penile shaft look shorter. If you want a bigger penis, check out your core and trim it down and your penis will grow larger….or at least it will appear to be longer.
In addition to this apparent shrinkage (which is reversible) the penis tends to undergo an actual (and irreversible) reduction in size. The reduction — in both length and thickness — typically isn’t dramatic but may be noticeable. “If a man’s erect penis is 6 inches long when he is in his 30s, it might be 5 or 5-and-a-half inches when he reaches his 60s or 70s.
What causes the penis to shrink? At least two mechanisms are involved, experts say. One is the slow deposition of fatty substances (plaques) inside tiny arteries in the penis, which impairs blood flow to the organ. This process, known as atherosclerosis, is the same one that contributes to blockages inside the coronary arteries — a leading cause of heart attack.
Another mechanism involves the gradual buildup of relatively inelastic collagen (scar tissue) within the stretchy fibrous sheath that surrounds the erection chambers. Erections occur when these chambers fill with blood. Blockages within the penile arteries — and increasingly inelastic chambers — mean smaller erections.

As penis size changes, so do the testicles. Starting around age 40, the testicles definitely begin to shrink. The testicles of a 30-year-old man might measure 2 inches in diameter, he says; those of a 60-year-old, perhaps only 1.5 inches.

Curvature. If penile scar tissue accumulates unevenly, the penis can become curved. This condition, known as Peyronie’s disease, occurs most commonly in middle age. It can cause painful erections and make intercourse difficult. The condition may require surgery.

Sensitivity. Numerous studies have shown that the penis becomes less sensitive over time. This can make it hard to achieve an erection and to have an orgasm.

Libido or sex drive
As men get older the testosterone level falls. Testosterone is the hormone produced in the testicles that is responsible for the sex drive. It reaches a peak in the 20’s and early 30’s and slowly declines at a rate of 2% a year. Men who have this problem can obtain a blood test, a serum testosterone test, and if it is low and there is no history of prostate cancer, then the man can receive testosterone supplements in the form of an injection every two weeks, the application of a daily gel to the lower abdomen or shoulders, or the insertion of a pellet under the skin which lasts for 4-6 months.

Bottom Line: Yes, there are changes that are going to occur as a man ages just as there are changes in muscle mass, bone density, memory, hearing, and vision. But this doesn’t mean the end of a man’s sex life. With good health, a willing partner, and a desire to pleasure your partner, you, too, can enjoy sexual intimacy in your silver years.

Male Hormone Deficiency-You Don’t Need To Wind Down When You Grow Older

November 13, 2012
Testosterone Deficiency

Don’t Wind Down With Hormone Deficiency

A decrease in the serum testosterone level may not be an inevitable part of aging but instead could be due to changes in smoking habits, body size, mental health status and chronic cardiovascular disease. And men who have declines in testosterone levels are more likely to be does to become obese, had stopped smoking, were depressed, or had persistent or new onset of heart disease.

It is also of interest that unmarried men had a significantly greater decline in testosterone levels compared to married man.

Bottom line: Testosterone deficiency can be a marker of underlying disease. Therefore, it is necessary if you are having the symptoms of low testosterone which include loss of energy, loss of muscle mass, and decreased libido, you should consider seeing your physician and being evaluated for these other comorbid conditions.

Summary of Life

July 13, 2012

I received this in a recent Email and would like to pass it along to my fellow bloggers.

GREAT TRUTHS THAT LITTLE CHILDREN HAVE LEARNED:
1) No matter how hard you try, you can’t baptize cats.
2) When your Mom is mad at your Dad, don’t let her brush your hair.
3) If your sister hits you, don’t hit her back. They always catch the second person.
4) Never ask your 3-year old brother to hold a tomato.
5) You can’t trust dogs to watch your food.
6) Don’t sneeze when someone is cutting your hair.
7) Never hold a Dust-Buster and a cat at the same time.
8) You can’t hide a piece of broccoli in a glass of milk.
9) Don’t wear polka-dot underwear under white shorts.
10) The best place to be when you’re sad is Grandma’s lap.

GREAT TRUTHS THAT ADULTS HAVE LEARNED:
1) Raising teenagers is like nailing jelly to a tree.
2) Wrinkles don’t hurt.
3) Families are like fudge…mostly sweet, with a few nuts.
4) Today’s mighty oak is just yesterday’s nut that held its ground.
5) Laughing is good exercise. It’s like jogging on the inside.
6) Middle age is when you choose your cereal for the fiber, not the toy.

GREAT TRUTHS ABOUT GROWING OLD
1) Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional…
2) Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.
3) When you fall down, you wonder what else you can do while you’re down there.
4) You’re getting old when you get the same sensation from a rocking chair that you once got from a roller coaster.
5) It’s frustrating when you know all the answers but nobody bothers to ask you the questions.
6) Time may be a great healer, but it’s a lousy beautician.
7) Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.

THE FOUR STAGES OF LIFE:
1) You believe in Santa Claus.
2) You don’t believe in Santa Claus.
3) You are Santa Claus.
4) You look like Santa Claus.

SUCCESS:

At age 4 success is . . . Not piddling in your pants.
At age 12 success is . . Having friends.
At age 17 success is . . Having a driver’s license.
At age 35 success is . . Having money.
At age 50 success is . . Having money..
At age 70 success is . . Having a drivers license.
At age 75 success is . . Having friends.
At age 80 success is . . Not piddling in your pants.

The Life and Death of the Penis-What’s Happening Down There As Men Grow Older

February 18, 2012

It is a fact that as a man ages, the penis also changes in size, shape, and function. This blog discusses some of those changes to help men better understand what’s happening “down there”.
It’s no secret that a man’s sexual function declines with age. As his testosterone level falls, it takes more to arouse him. Once aroused, he takes longer to get an erection and to achieve orgasm and, following orgasm, to become aroused again. Age brings marked declines in semen volume and sperm quality. Erectile dysfunction (ED), or impotence, is clearly linked to advancing years; between the ages of 40 and 70, the percentage of potent men falls from 60% to roughly 30%, studies show.
Men also experience a gradual decline in urinary function. Studies show that a man’s urine stream weakens over time, the consequence of weakened bladder muscles and, in many cases, prostate enlargement.
And that’s not all. Recent research confirms what men have long suspected and, in some cases, feared: that the penis itself undergoes significant changes as a man moves from his sexual prime — around age 30 for most guys — into middle age and on to his dotage. These changes include:
Appearance. There are two major changes. The head of the penis (the glans) gradually loses its purplish color, the result of reduced blood flow. And there is a slow loss of pubic hair. As testosterone wanes, the penis gradually reverts to its prepubertal, mostly hairless, state.
Penis Size. Weight gain is common as men grow older. As fat accumulates on the lower abdomen, the apparent size of the penis changes. A large prepubic fat pad makes the penile shaft appear shorter. Advice to obese men who are concerned about their shrinking size of their penis, if they would lose some weight especially in their abdominal area, the penis would appear to grow longer.
In addition to this apparent shrinkage (which is reversible) the penis tends to undergo an actual (and irreversible) reduction in size. The reduction — in both length and thickness — typically isn’t dramatic but may be noticeable. If a man’s erect penis is 6 inches long when he is in his 30s, it might be 5 or 5-and-a-half inches when he reaches his 60s or 70s.
What causes the penis to shrink? At least two mechanisms are involved, experts say. One is the slow deposition of fatty substances (plaques) inside tiny arteries in the penis, which impairs blood flow to the organ. This process, known as atherosclerosis, is the same one that contributes to blockages inside the coronary arteries — a leading cause of heart attack. It is common for men with coronary artery disease to have erectile dysfunction several years before they have chest pain or signs of a heart attack. It is this reason that men who have erectile dysfunction seek out medical care and be checked for heart disease.

Another mechanism involves the gradual buildup of relatively inelastic collagen (scar tissue) within the stretchy fibrous sheath that surrounds the erection chambers. Erections occur when these chambers fill with blood. Blockages within the penile arteries — and increasingly inelastic chambers — mean smaller erections.
As penis size changes, so do the testicles. Starting around age 40, the testicles definitely begin to shrink. The testicles of a 30-year-old man might measure 3 centimeters in diameter; those of a 60-year-old, perhaps only 2 centimeters.
Curvature. If penile scar tissue accumulates unevenly, the penis can become curved. This condition, known as Peyronie’s disease, occurs most commonly in middle age. It can cause painful erections and make intercourse difficult. The condition may require surgery.
Sensitivity. Numerous studies have shown that the penis becomes less sensitive over time. This can make it hard to achieve an erection and to have an orgasm. Whether it renders orgasm less pleasurable remains an open question.
Bottom line: The normal changes that occur in nearly all men need not ruin your erotic life. According to a good friend, Dr. Irwin Goldstein, “The most important ingredient for a satisfying sex life is the ability to satisfy your partner, and that doesn’t require peak sexual performance or a big penis.” Remember it isn’t the size of the penis, but how you use it that counts.
This has been modified from an article in WebMD by David Freeman, http://men.webmd.com/features/life-cycle-of-a-penis

Want To Live To a 100? Here’s Some Advice

July 2, 2011

WORDS TO LIVE BY— Japan Times Author/Physician Shigeaki Hinohara At the age of 97 years and 4 months, Shigeaki Hinohara is one of the world’s longest-serving physicians and educators. Hinohara’s magic touch is legendary: Since 1941 he has been healing patients at St. Luke’s International Hospital in Tokyo and teaching at St. Luke’s College of Nursing. After World War II, he envisioned a world-class hospital and college springing from the ruins of Tokyo; thanks to his pioneering spirit and business savvy, the doctor turned these institutions into the nation’s top medical facility and nursing school. Today he serves as chairman of the board of trustees at both organizations. Always willing to try new things, he has published around 150 books since his 75th birthday, including “Living Long, Living Good” that has sold more than 1.2 million copies. As the founder of the New Elderly Movement, Hinohara encourages others to live a long and happy life, a quest in which no role model is better than the doctor himself. Energy comes from feeling good, not from eating well or sleeping a lot. We all remember how as children, when we were having fun, we often forgot to eat or sleep. I believe that we can keep that attitude as adults, too. It’s best not to tire the body with too many rules such as lunchtime and bedtime. All people who live long — regardless of nationality, race or gender — share one thing in common: None are overweight. For breakfast I drink coffee, a glass of milk and some orange juice with a tablespoon of olive oil in it. Olive oil is great for the arteries and keeps my skin healthy. Lunch is milk and a few cookies, or nothing when I am too busy to eat. I never get hungry because I focus on my work. Dinner is veggies, a bit of fish and rice, and, twice a week, 100 grams of lean meat. Always plan ahead. My schedule book is already full until 2014, with lectures and my usual hospital work. In 2016 I’ll have some fun, though: I plan to attend the Tokyo Olympics! There is no need to ever retire, but if one must, it should be a lot later than 65. The current retirement age was set at 65 half a century ago, when the average life-expectancy in Japan was 68 years and only 125 Japanese were over 100 years old. Today, Japanese women live to be around 86 and men 80, and we have 36,000 centenarians in our country. In 20 years we will have about 50,000 people over the age of 100. Share what you know. I give 150 lectures a year, some for 100 elementary school children, others for 4,500 business people. I usually speak for 60 to 90 minutes, standing, to stay strong. When a doctor recommends you take a test or have some surgery, ask whether the doctor would suggest that his or her spouse or children go through such a procedure. Contrary to popular belief, doctors can’t cure everyone. So why cause unnecessary pain with surgery? I think music and animal therapy can help more than most doctors imagine. To stay healthy, always take the stairs and carry your own stuff. I take two stairs at a time, to get my muscles moving.

Bottom Line: We are living longer.  Dr. Shigeaki Hinohara is providing advice on how live with a admirable quality of life as well as achieve longevity.  Who would have thought that it all begins with climbing stairs instead of taking the elevator?

 

Rules For A Healthier You

June 22, 2011

Sleep

7 – 8 hours every night. Your body cannot heal with out proper rest.

Stress

Find a way to control stress.

Exercise

The definition of exercise is to raise your heart rate for 20 minutes at least three times a week. Daily is optimal and preferably outdoors in the fresh air and sunlight.

Nutrition

To live, eat live food. To die, eat dead food. We were created to live in a garden. Get to know your market, not the supermarket. Eat the food that is in season. 80% of your diet should be raw food in the summer 20% cooked, and in the winter, 800/0 cooked and 20% raw.

Shun prepared foods especially ones with artificial anything in them. Drink half your body weight in ounces water every day, either before you eat or after you eat–NEVER with a meal.

You may drink red wine with your meals, as it aids digestion.

Avoid toxins

Use natural deodorant and toothpaste.

Whatever touches your body is absorbed by your body. Wear gloves or a mask if you clean with chemicals.

Elimination

You should have 2 to 3 bowel movements every day.

Belief

Pray. Have an attitude of gratitude. Write down five things every day that you are grateful for.

Believe you will be healed. If you do not believe it will not happen. If you do, it will.

An Apple A Day Does More Thank Keep the Doctor Away-It Just Might Make You Live Longer…Especially If You Are a Fruit Fly!*

March 29, 2011

Scientists are reporting the first evidence that consumption of a healthful antioxidant substance in apples extends the average lifespan of test animals, and does so by 10 percent. The new results, obtained with fruit flies – stand-ins for humans in hundreds of research projects each year – bolster similar findings on apple antioxidants in other animal tests. The study appears in ACS’s Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Zhen-Yu Chen and colleagues note that damaging substances generated in the body, termed free radicals, cause undesirable changes believed to be involved in the aging process and some diseases. Substances known as antioxidants can combat this damage. Fruits and vegetables in the diet, especially brightly colored foods like tomatoes, broccoli, blueberries, and apples are excellent sources of antioxidants. A previous study with other test animals hinted that an apple antioxidant could extend average lifespan. In the current report, the researchers studied whether different apple antioxidants, known as polyphenols, could do the same thing in fruit flies.  (This is particularly good news for fruit flies. If I were a fruit fly I would want to live longer too.)

The researchers found that apple polyphenols not only prolonged the average lifespan of fruit flies but helped preserve their ability to walk, climb and move about. In addition, apple polyphenols reversed the levels of various biochemical substances found in older fruit flies and used as markers for age-related deterioration and approaching death. Chen and colleagues note that the results support those from other studies, including one in which women who often ate apples had a 13-22 percent decrease in the risk of heart disease, and polish the apple’s popular culture image as a healthy food.

*J Agric Food Chem. 2011 Mar 9;59(5):2097-106. Epub 2011 Feb 14.
Apple Polyphenols Extend the Mean Lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster.