Posts Tagged ‘hormone deficiency’

Boosting T Levels Without Medication

February 3, 2017

Testosterone is the male hormone produced in the testicles that is responsible for sex drive, energy, muscle and bone mass.  Testosterone decreases slowly in the late 20s and becomes symptomatic in men around middle age.  This blog will discuss natural ways of preserving and increasing your testosterone levels.

Get Moving: Drop 10, 15, or more pounds

Overweight men are likely to have less testosterone, which means less energy and increased susceptibility to depression.  If you shed pounds, you can cause your T levels to surge.

No Zinc In the Sink

Research has shown that supplementing your diet with zinc can improve testosterone levels. According to the National Institutes of Health, 45 per cent of us aren’t getting enough of the stuff.  Protein-rich foods like meat and fish are packed full of zinc, along with raw cheese, beans and natural yoghurt.

Sweet Nothings

In addition to causing you to pile on the pounds, sugar can also wreak havoc on testosterone production. Regular intake of the sweet stuff can cause insulin to spike, which is a factor leading to low levels of testosterone.

To counteract the effect, simply limit your sugar intake – the overall health benefits far outweigh a quick dopamine hit from a soft drink.

Take D and See

Vitamin D is a steroid hormone, which means it boosts your sperm count, , libido and  testosterone.  You can increase your vitamin D by being exposed to sunshine.  Since I don’t condone exposure to sun as it causes skin cancers, then vitamin D supplementation is in order, 1000 IU\day.  This is available in most nutrition and drug stores.

Stress Less

Kicking back is easier said than done, but a reduction in stress will work wonders for your testosterone production. Cortisol (the stuff your body makes when you get hot under the collar) actually blocks testosterone. Chronic stress has actually been shown to stop testosterone production, which translates to bad moods, fatigue and decreased libido.

Exercise and weight loss are beneficial in reducing stress levels so this is another reason to getting moving!

Fat and Fit

Eat ‘good’ fats of the monounsaturated variety. You can find a high dose of these fats in foods like olive oil, almonds, avocados and grass-fed meats.

Going From ZZZZZ to T

Men who got a full eight hours sleep had 60 per cent more testosterone than their sleep-deprived counterparts.  I recommend stop looking at screens, i.e., computer and TV screens at least an hour before bedtime as screen watching affects melatonin which if decreased can make it difficult to have a good nights sleep.

It’s Quicker Without Liquor

We all know that alcohol consumption is bad for us – but it’s bad for your Johnson. Not only does too much booze lower growth hormone levels and increase cortisol, it will reduce your testosterone levels for up to 24-hours.  I recommend 1-2 glasses of alcohol a day and definitely avoid binging.

Bottom Line:  Testosterone is a necessary ingredient for your sex drive, your energy level, and overall body metabolism.  The hormone also affects our moods and psychological well-being.  I have provided you some suggestions for boosting this very important hormone.

Depression, Anti-Depressants, and Low Testosterone Levels

February 2, 2017

Hormone deficiency is common in many middle age and older men.  It is of interest that many men using anti-depressants also are found to have low testosterone levels.

Many people that take antidepressants, specifically SSRI’s (selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitors), find out that they have low testosterone.  We are not certain about the mechanism of action of SSRI’s and low T levels but the effect is certainly prevalent.

Many men with depression tend to have lower than average sex drives. It is the depression that is thought to lead to disinterest in pleasurable activities like sex. Men may be so depressed and have a decreased libido, that they don’t feel like having sex.

If your testosterone level were to be lowered, the natural result would be a reduced sex drive. This reduced sex drive could be linked to depression – therefore testosterone could play a role.

Individuals with lower than average levels of testosterone could be experiencing depressive symptoms as a result of their low T. Studies have found that among men with abnormally low levels of T, testosterone therapy helped reduce symptoms of depression.

It is well documented that antidepressants can affect hormones. Therefore some hypothesize that hormonal changes can influence our sex drive. It is not known whether antidepressants are the culprit behind lowering levels of testosterone. Many men that have taken SSRI’s believe that the drugs they took lowered their testosterone.

On average, men tend to naturally experience lower levels of testosterone by the time they reach age 50. By age 60 it is estimated that 1 in 5 men have problems with their testosterone. In cases where men experienced a reduction in their level of testosterone and simultaneously became depressed, increasing testosterone levels can be therapeutic.

In older men, testosterone therapy may prove to yield antidepressant effects. Most medical research demonstrates that testosterone can have positive effects on mood. It seems as though testosterone treatment tends to be most beneficial for men who are experiencing depression as a result of testosterone decline.

Bottom Line:  Many middle age men have been placed on SSRI’s for depression.  This can result in a decrease in the testosterone level.  If you are experiencing a decrease in your libido, have decreased energy, and loss of muscle mass, you may have low T levels.  The diagnosis is easily made with a blood test and treatment consists of testosterone replacement therapy.

Latest News on Testosterone-NBC Nightly News on 2\17\16

February 17, 2016

Testosterone gel can help some men get back a little of their loving feelings, and helps them feel better in general, according to a new study published today by the National Institute of Health.

It’s the first study in years to show any benefit for testosterone therapy. This was the first time that a trial demonstrated that testosterone treatment of men over 65 who have low testosterone would benefit them in any way.  The trial showed that testosterone treatment of these men improved their sexual function, their mood, and reduced depressive symptoms—and perhaps also improved walking.

The FDA does not approve the use of testosterone to treat the effects of aging. But it’s already a $2 billion industry, with millions of men buying gel, pills or getting injections.

Experts stress that the results, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, only apply to men over 65 who have medically diagnosed low testosterone. The trial consisted of 800 men.

A few men had heart attacks or were diagnosed with prostate cancer during the study, but the rate were the same in men who got real hormone and in those who got placebo cream.

Men in the testosterone group were more likely than those in the placebo group to report that their sexual desire had improved since the beginning of the trial. Men who received testosterone reported better sexual function, including activity, desire, and erectile function, than those who received placebo. Although the effect sizes were low to moderate, men in the testosterone group were more likely than those in the placebo group to report that their sexual desire had improved.

Testosterone was also associated with small but significant benefits with respect to mood and depressive symptoms. Men in the testosterone group were also more likely than those in the placebo group to report that their energy was better.

As men age, their bodies make less testosterone. It’s not as sudden as when women lose estrogen, but the effects can be similar – loss of energy, sexual desire, depression and bone loss.

Bottom Line: Testosterone is the male hormone responsible for sex drive, erections, bone strength, muscle mass, and even mood.  The hormone decreases starting in men in their 20’s and usually become symptomatic in the late 40s and 50s.  The diagnosis is easily made with a simple blood test and treatment is easily accomplished with injections, topical gels, or pellets inserted underneath the skin.  For more information speak to your doctor.

FAQs on Erectile Dysfunction

December 5, 2015

It often is a mystery about men are able to achieve and hold an erection.  Even more mysterious is what are the causes of failure of erections and to fix the problem.  It is not uncommon for me to feel uncomfortable broaching the topic with their physician.  Fortunately, after the introduction of oral medication to treat impotence or erectile dysfunction in 1999, men are talking about their problems in the bedroom with their physicians.

In this blog I will discuss some of the most frequently asked questions about ED and the treatment for this common condition that impacts over 14 million American men.

  1. Why does Viagra fix the problem?

An erection requires an increase in the blood supply to the penis and more blood has to rush into the chambers of the penis than comes out of the penis.  When this happens, an erection will occur. Viagra helps blood vessels relax and increases the blood supply to the penis.

  1. Does the male hormone, testosterone, have a role in the erection process?

Testosterone acts on a series of different areas of the body to enhance bone development, muscle growth, sexual interest and function. Testosterone is primarily responsible for the libido or sex drive.  The testosterone level slowly decreases at a rate of about 1% a year starting around 25.  By middle age, most men start experiencing signs and symptoms of testosterone deficiency and men often need hormone replacement therapy.  This can be accomplished with injections, topical gels, or pellets of testosterone inserted under the skin.

  1. Why does sex feel good?

There is a high concentration of nerve endings in the penis and vagina, which triggers stimulation and orgasm. Dopamine is triggered and there is a pleasant feeling in the brain during ejaculation. It could also be an evolutionary thing. When we were cavemen with only animal instincts, the fact that sex feels good encouraged us to reproduce to keep the species going.

  1. Do sexually transmitted disease cause erectile dysfunction?

Gonorrhea and chlamydia are both sexually transmitted diseases that are caused by direct and unprotected sexual contact. Both STDs live in reproductive genital tracts of men and women and can be cured with antibiotics. If both STDs go untreated, it can lead to infection that will lead to infertility in men but usually does not cause erectile dysfunction.

5 Why does sex hurt?

The obvious reason is if the man’s penis is much larger than a woman’s vagina opening. The other possibility is that women have a decrease in lubrication of the vagina and the friction is a source of pain and discomfort usually for the men but also for the male partner as well.

Bottom Line:  Impotence is a common condition especially in middle age or older men.  Treatment is available and most men can be helped.  Talk to your doctor.

Testosterone Deficiency: Male Menopause Which Is HARDly The Pause That Refreshes!

November 21, 2015

Everyone has heard about menopause for women.  This is due to a decrease in estrogen production from the ovaries.  Men also have a fall in their testosterone, the male hormone produced in the testicles, also decreases a small amount after age 30 but becomes symptomatic around age 50.  The problem affects millions of American men who have decreased sex drive, lethargy, loss of muscle mass, decrease in bone density, and even irritability\depression.  This blog will discuss the problem of male menopause or andropause.

Men losing testosterone is a steady decline, like a leak in a swimming pool you never refill. Over time, you empty out all your stores, creating a constellation of problems.

The constellation of problems compound each other, too. The apathy comes in part from the decline in hormones, which results in loss of lean muscle mass, depression, and forgetfulness. But it becomes a downward cycle, as the less lean muscle mass a person has, the faster he or she gains weight, which leads to more depression.

The seriousness of the problem of male depression tied to aging cannot be denied, as middle-aged and older men account for more than 20 percent of suicides, as compared to about 5 percent for women. Older white males represent 70 percent of suicides.  Before starting anti-depressants, doctors caring for older men with symptoms of depression should get a serum testosterone level and replace the hormone with testosterone replacement therapy before initiating anti-depressants.

Most of my physician referrals come from psychiatrists and neurologists, as men are seeing them because of depression and memory issues. Psychiatrists and neurologists know what a reduction in testosterone does to emotional well-being and brain function. These specialists want their patients to be tested for low testosterone before trying anti-depressants or other prescription therapies.

The reason more general physicians don’t think of, or want, to go the hormone testing route? Testosterone therapy got a bad rap a few years ago when there was a lot of misinformation with regard to testosterone being dangerous and possibly being linked to an increase in prostate cancer and heart disease.

There have been poorly designed studies, just as there were poorly designed studies with women’s hormone studies, such as the Women’s Health Initiative, indicating that it might be dangerous for women to take hormone replacement therapy. The result is that these defective studies resulted in a lot of men are not doing testosterone optimization correctly. There is a big difference between what is considered a normal level of hormones, which in America, is often abused to build super-normal muscle mass, and those levels at which men literally come back to life again.

Ideally men need to have their testosterone levels drawn in the morning when the testosterone levels are the highest. If the man has the symptoms described above and has a low testosterone level, they are candidates for hormone replacement therapy using injections of testosterone, topical gels containing testosterone, or testosterone pellets that are inserted under the skin every 4-6 months.

Many of these men come in saying they feel like half a man; well they are, because they are trying to live on half the amount of testosterone they had when they were younger. When they feel better, they make changes such as losing weight, or changing careers, because with the low level of testosterone, they didn’t care enough to do it before.

Bottom Line: If you don’t feel the same way about yourself or your partner, and you are in your 40s, 50s, or 60s, it may well be that one or both of you have hormonal issues. It makes sense to try and fix that with a brief history, physical exam and a testosterone blood test.

Low T (Testosterone) May Mean No Baby

February 19, 2015

I am often seeing men with symptoms of low testosterone levels who are still planning to have children. These men need to know that the standard treatment of hormone replacement may not apply to those men who are still interested in having children. This blog will discuss the management of men with low T and who wish to continue to have children.

Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) can bring your testosterone levels back to normal and restore your sex drive.
But if you want to have children, there’s one downside to TRT you should know about. It gives you back your sex life, but it might also reduce your ability to father children as long as you’re on it.
Testosterone replacement therapy has a profound impact on a man’s reproductive potential.

Approximately 90% of men can drop their sperm counts to zero while on testosterone. By increasing testosterone, you’re not going to increase fertility.

Testosterone, the hormone produced in the testicles, plays an important role in making sperm. Your brain makes special hormones, called gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH). These hormones signal the testes to make more testosterone, vital for a healthy sperm count. When you’re getting testosterone replacement therapy, testosterone is added into the bloodstream by patches, gels, or other treatment methods such as pellets placed under the skin. Your brain interprets this rise in testosterone levels as a sign that you now have enough testosterone. So it stops sending signals to the testes to make more testosterone. But when your testes don’t make more testosterone, your sperm production goes down.
Therefore, a low sperm count makes it harder to conceive a child. My advice is that if you have any kind of reproductive goal, you should not be using TRT.

If you have low testosterone, one way to improve sperm count is with gonadotropin injections. This stimulates the production of sperm. It may be considered as a way to increase a man’s fertility when your partner are having trouble conceiving a child.
It’s standard practice to check a man’s sperm count when a couple has difficulty getting pregnant. If your sperm count is low, the next step is to measure your testosterone. If it’s below normal, we can then inject the signal to produce more testosterone by giving a gonadotropin.

You should also make sure to follow a lifestyle of regular exercise and a healthy diet if you want to father a child. Overweight and obese men tend to have lower testosterone levels because excess belly fat converts testosterone to estrogen, another hormone that can impact sperm production. Shedding those extra pounds will likely have a positive effect on your fertility. Losing weight can definitely increase testosterone.

Bottom Line: If you have symptoms of low testosterone levels or if you have an abnormal sperm count, hormone replacement with testosterone is not the treatment of choice. You should consider gonadotropin injections as a solution.

Testosterone Replacement In Men Who Wish To Continue Family Planning

November 24, 2014

Testosterone Replacement In Men Who Wish To Continue Family Planning

Millions of men have testosterone deficiency. Most of the men are middle age and older and, therefore, family planning is not an issue. However, if younger men have a low testosterone level and wish to continue family planning, the usual replacement with testosterone injections, gels or pellets is contraindicated because testosterone can reduce the sperm count making fertility difficult or impossible. This blog will discuss treatment of low T in younger men who wish to continue to have a family.

Function of Testosterone

Testosterone is the most important sex hormone or androgen produced in men. The function of testosterone is primarily the producing the normal adult male characteristics. During puberty, testosterone stimulates the physical changes that constitute the attributes of the adult male.

Throughout adult life, testosterone helps maintain sex drive, the production of sperm cells, male hair patterns, muscle mass and bone mass. Testosterone is produced in men by the testes and in the outer layer of the adrenal glands.

The hypothalamus controls hormone production in the pituitary gland by means of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). This hormone tells the pituitary gland to make follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and Luteinizing hormone (LH). LH orders the testes to produce testosterone. If the testes begin producing too much testosterone, the brain sends signals to the pituitary to make less LH. This, in turn, slows the production of testosterone. If the testes begin producing too little testosterone, the brain sends signals to the pituitary gland telling it to make more LH, which causes the testes to make more testosterone.

Symptoms of Low Testosterone

The failure of the testes to produce a sufficient level of testosterone in the adult male results in a low testosterone level. Physical signs of low testosterone in men may include:

Declining sex drive,
Erectile dysfunction (ED),
Low sperm count
Decrease in lean muscle mass
Insomnia or sleep disorder
Depression
Chronic fatigue.
Conditions Causing Male Testosterone Deficiency

Testosterone deficiency can be caused by different conditions: 1) effects of aging; 2) testes based conditions; 3) genetics; and 4) conditions caused by the pituitary and hypothalamus.

The effects of aging on testosterone production
Testes disorder
Pituitary/Hypothalamus disorder
Genetically-based condition
Function of Testosterone Therapy

The function of testosterone hormone replacement therapy is to increase the level of testosterone in the adult male diagnosed with testosterone deficiency (low testosterone) or hypogonadism. Testosterone replacement should in theory approximate the natural, endogenous production of the hormone. The clinical reasons for treatment of testosterone deficiency in men include:

Increased male sex drive
Improve male sexual performance
Enhance mood in men
Reduce depression in men
Increased energy and vitality
Increase bone density
Increased strength and endurance
Reduce body fat
Increase body hair growth
Reduce risk of heart disease
Develop lean muscle mass with exercise
Function of HCG Therapy is to Stimulate the Testes to Prevent Loss of Natural Testosterone Production and Avoid Testicular Atrophy while the Male Patient is Undergoing Testosterone Hormone Replacement Therapy

The hormone HCG is prescribed for men in this therapy to increase natural testosterone production during the course of therapy as a result of the stimulation of the testes by the HCG. No testosterone medication is administered in this treatment. The treatment objective is to cause the male testes to naturally produce a higher volume of testosterone by HCG stimulation of his testes with the result that the patient experiences a continuing higher blood level of testosterone while on treatment. Another treatment objective is to avoid the use of any anabolic steroid and its adverse side effects upon the patient.

HCG Therapy normally increases natural testosterone production by the male testes while HCG is administered to the patient during the treatment period However, HCG Therapy can also result in a continuation of increased testosterone production and a resulting higher level of testosterone in the bloodstream after treatment is completed when the cause of the patient’s low natural LH secretion by the pituitary is not due to the patient’s natural genetics, aging process, injury to or loss of one or both testes; a medical disorder or disease affecting the testes, or castration.

HCG Therapy can result in a continuing higher level of natural testosterone production by the testes after HCG Therapy is completed when the underlying cause of the low LH secretion and resulting low testosterone production (1) is due to the prior use of one or more anabolic steroids by the patient or (2) due to the administration of testosterone in a prior hormone replacement therapy without the required concurrent HCG Therapy to prevent the patient’s endocrine system (hypothalamus pituitary-testes axis) from shutting down the natural production of testosterone by the testes and causing testicular atrophy.

Types of Testosterone Therapy for Men

A good male testosterone replacement therapy produces and maintains physiologic serum concentrations of testosterone and its active metabolites without significant adverse side effects.

The leading types of testosterone therapy for men include:

Testosterone Injection with HCG
Testosterone Transdermal Cream with HCG
Testosterone Transdermal Gel with HCG
Benefits of HCG Therapy for the Male Patient Undergoing Testosterone Hormone Replacement Therapy

Increases natural testosterone production by the testes
Prevents loss of natural testosterone production by the testes while the male patient is undergoing testosterone hormone replacement therapy
Prevents atrophy of testes while male patient is being treated with testosterone replacement therapy
Increases physical energy and elimination of chronic fatigue
Improves sex drive
Improves sexual performance
Improves mood
Reduces depression
Increases lean muscle mass
Increases strength and endurance as a result of exercise
Reduces body fat due to increased exercise
Increases sperm count and therefore male fertility
HCG Therapy can also result in a higher level of natural testosterone production after HCG Therapy is completed when the cause of a man’s current low testosterone production is the prior use of anabolic steroids that shut down or reduced the pituitary gland’s production of LH and decreased testosterone production.
Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (HCG)

HCG is compounded by a compounding pharmacy or manufactured by pharmaceutical company in 10,000 IU (International Units) for reconstitution with sterile water for injections in 10 cc vials.

HCG is a natural protein hormone secreted by the human placenta and purified from the urine of pregnant women. HCG hormone is not a natural male hormone but mimics the natural hormone LH (Luteinizing Hormone) almost identically. As a result of HCG stimulating the testes in the same manner as LH, HCG therapy increases testosterone production by the testes or male gonads as a result of HCG’s stimulating effect on the leydig cells of the testes.

The Decline in Gonadal Stimulating Pituitary Hormone LH (Leutenizing hormone)

The natural decline in male testosterone production that occurs with aging is attributed to a decline in the gonadal stimulating pituitary hormone LH (Luteinizing hormone). As a result of the hypothalamus secreting less gonadoropin-releasing hormone (GhRH), which stimulates the pituitary gland to produce LH, the pituitary gland produces declining amounts of LH. This decrease in the pituitary secretion of LH reduces the stimulation of the gonads or male testes and results in declining testosterone and sperm production due to the decreased function of the gonads. The decreased stimulation of the testes by the pituitary’s diminished secretion of LH can also cause testicular atrophy. HCG stimulates the testis in the same manner as naturally produced. HCG Therapy is administered medically to increase male fertility by stimulating the testes to produce more sperm cells and thereby increase sperm count or Spermatogenesis.

The decreased stimulation of the testes by the pituitary’s diminished secretion of LH can also cause testicular atrophy. HCG stimulates the testis in the same manner as naturally produced. HCG Therapy is administered medically to increase male fertility by stimulating the testes to produce more sperm cells and thereby increase sperm count or Spermatogenesis.

How HCG Therapy Increases Plasma Testosterone Level in Men with Low Testosterone Production

HCG therapy uses the body’s own biochemical stimulating mechanisms to increase plasma testosterone level during HCG therapy. It is used to stimulate the testes of men who are hypogonadal or lack sufficient testosterone. The male endocrine system is responsible for causing the testes to produce testosterone. The HPTA (hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis) regulates the level of testosterone in the bloodstream. and . The hypothalamus produces gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), which stimulates the pituitary gland to release Leutenizing hormone (LH).

LH released by the pituitary gland then travels from the pituitary via the blood stream to the testes where it triggers the production and release of testosterone. Without the continuing release of LH by the pituitary gland, the testes would shut down their production of testosterone, causing testicular atrophy and stopping natural testosterone produced by the testes.

As men age the volume of hypothalamus produced gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) declines and causes the pituitary gland to release less Luteinizing hormone (LH). The reduction if the volume of LH released by the Pituitary gland decreases the available LH in the blood stream to stimulate the testes to produce testosterone.

In males, HCG mimics LH and increases testosterone production in the testes. As such, HCG is administered to patients to increase endogenous (natural) testosterone production. The HCG medication administered combines with the patient’s own naturally available LH released into the blood stream by the Pituitary gland and thereby increases the stimulation of the testes to produce more testosterone than that produced by the Pituitary released LH alone. The additional HCG added to the blood stream combined with the Pituitary gland’s naturally produced LH triggers a greater volume of testosterone production by the testes, since HCG mimics LH and adds to the total stimulation of the testes.

HCG Clinical Pharmacology

The action of HCG is virtually identical to that of pituitary LH, although HCG appears to have a small degree of FSH activity as well. It stimulates production of gonadal steroid hormones by stimulating the interstitial cells (Leydig cells) of the testis to produce androgens.

Thus HCG sends the same message and results in increased testosterone production by the testis due to HCG’s effect on the leydig cells of the testis. HCG therapy uses the body’s own biochemical stimulating mechanisms to increase plasma testosterone level.

Following intramuscular injection, an increase in serum HCG concentrations may be observed within 2 hours; peak HCG concentrations occur within about 6 hours and persist for about 36 hours. Serum HCG concentrations begin to decline at 48 hours and approach baseline (undetectable) levels after about 72 hours.

HCG is not a steroid and is administered to assists the body in the continuing production of its own natural testosterone as a result of LH signals stimulating production of testosterone by the testis.

This LH stimulates the production of testosterone by the testes in males. Thus HCG sends the same message as LH to the testes and results in increased testosterone production by the testes due to HCG’s effect on the leydig cells of the testes. In males, hCG mimics LH and helps restore and maintain testosterone production in the testes. If HCG is used for too long and in too high a dose, the resulting rise in natural testosterone will eventually inhibit its own production via negative feedback on the hypothalamus and pituitary.

HCG therapy uses the body’s own biochemical stimulating mechanisms to increase plasma testosterone level during HCG therapy. It is used to stimulate the testes of men who are hypogonadal or lack sufficient testosterone

Do Women Have Low T? The Role Of Testosterone in Women

July 28, 2014

Testosterone is the male hormone produced in the testicles that is responsible for sex drive or libido. Women also make testosterone in their ovaries. After menopause the amount of testosterone is decreased and will affect a woman’s sex drive and libido.
Testosterone, widely and misleadingly understood to be the “male” hormone. Men produce 10 times more testosterone than women, but in their early reproductive years women have 10 times more testosterone than estrogen coursing through their bodies. And many experts now believe that it’s the loss of testosterone, and not estrogen, that causes women in midlife to tend to gain weight, feel fatigue and lose mental focus, bone density and muscle tone — as well as their libido. Testosterone is a woman’s most abundant biologically active hormone. Adequate levels of testosterone are necessary for physical and mental health in both sexes.



Benefits for Women
 
Women, before, during and past menopause, and sometimes as early as in their mid-30s, invariably have low testosterone levels. Not all women will experience its wide variety of symptoms, like low libido, hot flashes, fatigue, mental fogginess and weight gain. For those who do, and who seek to avoid taking synthetic oral hormones (shown by National Institutes of Health findings to pose an increased risk for breast cancer, heart attack, stroke, blood clots and dementia), bioidentical testosterone (whose molecular structure is the same as natural testosterone) has been shown to be safe and effective.

Some testosterone is converted by the body into estrogen — which partly explains why it is useful in treating menopausal symptoms. For those at high risk for breast cancer, or who have had it, that conversion can be prevented by combining testosterone with anastrozole — an aromatase inhibitor that prevents conversion to estrogen. Nonetheless, testosterone has been shown to beneficial for patients with breast cancer. Preliminary data presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology have shown that, in combination with anastrozole, testosterone was effective in treating symptoms of hormone deficiency in breast cancer survivors, without an increased risk of blood clots, strokes or other side effects of the more widely used oral estrogen-receptor modulators tamoxifen and raloxifene.

Other benefits cited for testosterone therapy include:

Relieving symptoms of menopause, like hot flashes, vaginal dryness, incontinence and urinary urgency.

Enhancing mental clarity and focus. Researchers at Utrecht University in Holland recently found that testosterone appears to encourage “rational decision-making, social scrutiny and cleverness.”

Reducing anxiety, balancing mood and relieving depression combined with fatigue. Dr. Stephen Center, a family practitioner in San Diego who has treated women with testosterone for 20 years, says the regimen consistently delivers “improvement in self-confidence, initiative and drive.”

Increasing bone density, decreasing body fat and cellulite, and increasing lean muscle mass. Testosterone is the best remedy available for eliminating midlife upper-arm batwings.

Offering protection against cardiovascular events, by increasing blood flow and dilating blood vessels, and against Type 2 diabetes, by decreasing insulin resistance.

Countering the Myths

Some women believe, also incorrectly, that testosterone therapy will produce “masculinizing” traits, like hoarseness and aggression. While the hormone may cause inappropriate hair growth and acne in some women, those side effects can be remedied by lowering the dose.

Testosterone therapy has been approved for a variety of conditions in women as well as men in Britain and Australia. But while the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved of testosterone for use in men whose natural levels are low, the agency has not sanctioned it for women, for any reason.

How Treatment Works

Women can take testosterone as a cream, through a patch or in the form of pellet implants, which have the highest consistency of delivery. Synthesized from yams or soybeans, and compounded of pure, bioidentical testosterone, the pellets, each slightly larger than a grain of rice, are inserted just beneath the skin in the hip in a one-minute outpatient procedure. They dissolve slowly over three to four months, releasing small amounts of testosterone into the blood stream, but speeding up when needed by the body — during strenuous activities, for example — and slowing down during quiet times, a feature no other form of hormone therapy can provide.

To determine a patient’s dosage, some doctors measure testosterone levels in the blood.

Side effects of the insertion procedure, which are rare, include infection, minor bleeding and the pellet working its way out or being extruded. Some patients notice improvements within a day or two; others do not perceive benefits for a couple of weeks.

Bottom Line: Since implantation is a surgical procedure, and the pellets are manufactured by a variety of pharmaceutical compounders, who may have varying safety standards, it’s important for women to consult with an experienced, board-certified physician about treatment. Ask your doctor if you feel you are having symptoms related to low testosterone and see if testosterone replacement would be right for you

Low testosterone in men shouldn’t be ignored

July 28, 2014

Low testosterone in men shouldn’t be ignored

Posted on July 11, 2014 at 5:21 PM
Meg Farris / Eyewitness News
Email: mfarris@wwltv.com | Twitter: @megfarriswwl

NEW ORLEANS – Beginning around the age of 30, men start losing one percent of an important hormone each year.

And doctors say it is important to replace it for quality of life and long term health.
Jerry Tolbert played basketball in the Air Force. In golf, he usually hits a few strokes over par, but in his mid 50s, something changed.

“As men we don’t like to talk about those things. Just seems like it’s something about that you keep to yourself,” said Tolbert.

Jerry was going through andropause. His testosterone levels were declining, like menopause in women. The hormone testosterone is responsible for sex drive and performance, muscle and bone mass, energy, mood, thinking and metabolism, helping decrease fat storage. So when he didn’t feel like himself, he turned to urologist Dr. Neil Baum.
“If your testosterone level is low, it is good medicine to raise it to normal,” explained Dr. Baum, a urologist at Touro. He says with other medical conditions, such as blood pressure, glucose and thyroid levels, doctors don’t hesitate to help patients bring those to normal.

Dr. Baum says when levels of testosterone drop, men can fall asleep after meals more easily, have low sex drive, energy and motivation, along with muscle and fitness loss and mood changes such as irritability and depression.

So with a simple blood test to diagnose low-T along with symptoms, he uses injections or creams or even tiny pellet implants to replace what the body no longer makes.

Dr. Baum wants to make it abundantly clear, this is not about taking a lot of testosterone to make you super human like some of the professional athletes do. This is simply about replacing what your body no longer makes to bring you up to normal.

He says a recent study raising concerns about testosterone replacement and risks for heart attacks and strokes, was poorly done, even including women in the study.

“The study is really flawed from so many different areas and now a new study came out that demonstrates that replacing testosterone improves the cardiac function improves, decreases the risk of stroke and it may be cardio-protective instead of cardio-dangerous,” he added.

Now at 67 years old, Jerry feels normal and his clothes fit better.

“I had this midriff bulge, that’s going away now. It’s not as bad as it was,” said Tolbert about his midsection since he began hormone replacement therapy.
Going years with low testosterone can increase risk for hip and spine fractures, diabetes and heart disease as well as cognitive declines, loss of sex drive, sexual performance and overall energy.

Doctors do not recommend oral hormone replacement at all, or replacement for men not finished having children.

Aveed – New Long Acting Injection Treatment For Low Testosterone

June 13, 2014

Aveed – New Treatment For Low Testosterone

Many of you may have heard about a “new” long acting form of injectable testosterone that is available in the U.S.A. and the U.K. Known as Aveed in the U.S.A. Both Aveed and Nebido are oily injections that contain 1000mg of testosterone undecanoate. These pharmaceuticals are the first preparations that allow the individual to drastically reduce the number of injections to approximately four per year, once testosterone levels are stabilized.
Previously the only other option for long lasting testosterone delivery was the implant, otherwise known as “pellets”. This is a procedure where local anesthetic is generally applied to an area of skin, usually on the abdomen or buttock, where the pellets will be placed. A number of small “pellets” are then placed under the skin. These are expected to last four to six months. It has been estimated that approximately 2-3 percent of the pellets inserted force themselves to the surface of the skin.
Many of you, who are not using implants, are using the injectable forms of testosterone marketed as testosterone cypionate and testosterone enanthate. These are also both oily injections that are generally injected every ten days to three weeks depending on your current dosage and testosterone levels.
As with all medications however, there are side-effects. Many of you would be aware of the patient leaflet supplied with all vials of testosterone that indicate possible side-effects. Aveed is no different. These include diarrhea, leg pain, dizziness/headache, breathing problems, acne, itching, and breast-pain and enlargement. Some of the other effects known to occur in this preparation included weight gain, muscle cramps, nervousness, hostility, depression, sleep apnea, water retention, skin conditions and balding. A rare complication is a lung embolus of the oil causing shortness of breadth and chest pain. These symptoms are usually transient and dissipate after just a few minutes.
This, of course, does not mean that these symptoms will occur in all individuals who use the preparation. It is, however, always wise to weigh up the options available to you. It is most important to inform your doctor of any medical issues or concerns you may have so that the most suitable preparation can be chosen for you.