Posts Tagged ‘hypoactive sexual desire’

Woman Can Turn On Just Like Men-Addyi, Female Viagra

October 27, 2015

Women have been waiting for decades to catch up with men in the area of intimacy with their partners. Men have been fortunate that Viagra, Cialis, and Levitra have worked wonders for millions of American men. Today there is a female Viagra, called Addyi or flibanserin that is helping women with a decreased sexual desire.

Experts are calling Addyi, the so-called “female Viagra” that’s become the first-ever FDA-approved pill for hypoactive sexual desire disorder, a revolution for women’s sexual health.

The approval of Addyi is the most important advancement in female sexual health since the oral contraceptive was approved in 1960.

It validates women’s right to treatment for sexual problems and their right to sexual health. Let the truth be told that Addyi validates that there is as much biology as psychology with regard to women’s sexual function and this is the same for men.
Addyi also known as the “little pink pill,” doesn’t work the same way that Viagra does in men. Instead of affecting blood flow to the genitals, as Viagra does, Addyi targets certain serotonin receptors in the central nervous system within the brain —similar to how anti-depression medications target other receptors — in order to improve sexual desire.

Until Addyi there were no FDA-approved drugs that targeted low sexual desire in either men or women. The FDA’s approval of Addyi to the breakthrough in men’s sexual health research when Viagra was first approved in 1998. Before then, doctors told men that erectile dysfunction was all in their heads and the only treatment offered men was testosterone which was seldom effective. Now, in 2015, we accept that there are physical reasons such as diabetes, heart disease, and hundreds of medications that result in men not being able to obtain or sustain erections. Addyi’s introduction to the marketplace could do the same for the estimated 5.5 million to 8.6 million U.S. women suffering from hypoactive sexual desire disorder, meaning a chronic lack of interest in sex.

Addyi was originally formulated as an anti-depressant. While it failed to treat depression, researchers noticed that it did increase sexual desire. Sprout Pharmaceuticals then tested it for safety and effectiveness in more than 11,000 women before winning the recent FDA approval. In three randomized studies women who took Addyi had between one-half to one more satisfying sexual event per month on average than women who took placebo pills. It also increased sexual desire as compared to the placebo, as well as lowered distress related to sexual desire dysfunction.

Although the root causes of low sexual desire in women include relationship issues and changing hormone levels due to aging.

The drug’s side effects, which include severely low blood pressure and loss of consciousness if taken with alcohol, are comparable to the side effects of psychoactive medications that were able to win FDA approval far more easily than Addyi. The most common side effects were dizziness, sleepiness, nausea and fatigue, which is why the pill is recommended for use before bed.

Bottom Line: Women with decreased sexual desire now have a medication that may solve that problem. Addyi has now been approved by the FDA for the treatment of low sexual desire in women. For more information, speak to your physician.

New Agent for Female Sexual Dysfunction Has Promise

May 2, 2014

Female sexual dysfunction, decreased sex drive, decreased vaginal lubrication, and lack of orgasm, is more common than male sexual dysfunction or erectile dysfunction. Unfortunately, until recently no treatment has been found to be effective for female sexual dysfunction.

A new drug, bremelanotide, appeared to reduce distress and increase satisfaction among premenopausal women with female sexual dysfunction, researchers reported here.

In a study that specifically looked at decreased sexual desire reported that treatment with bremelanotide resulted in women boosting the number of satisfactory sexual events in a month.

Patients taking bremelanotide reported more nausea, flushing, and headaches than those on placebo. About 10% of the woman using bremelanotide withdrew from the study because of adverse events, but the drug was generally well tolerated.

Bremelanotide is now awaiting approval from the FDA.

Bottom Line: Female sexual dysfunction affects millions of women. Until now little could be done to help women regain their desire for intimacy. The FDA is now looking into the use of bremelanotide as a solution for this common problem.

Use It Or Lose It – Erectile Dysfunction Lower In Men Who Have Intercourse More Often

December 28, 2010

Men, I have good news for you.  Having intercourse more often may help prevent the development of erectile dysfunction (ED). A new study reports that researchers have found that men who had intercourse more often were less likely to develop ED.

Investigators from Finland observed that men reporting intercourse less than once per week had twice the incidence of erectile dysfunction compared with those reporting intercourse more than once per week. Also the risk of erectile dysfunction was inversely related to the frequency of intercourse, i.e., more intimacy less ED.

Regular intercourse has an important role in preserving erectile function among elderly men, whereas morning erection does not exert a similar effect. Continued sexual activity decreases the incidence of erectile dysfunction in direct proportion to frequency of intercourse.

Bottom Line:  Regular intercourse protects men from the development of erectile dysfunction, which may, in turn, impact general health and quality of life.  Therefore, if your partner tells you that they have a headache, you tell them your doctor said it was healthy for you to “do it”!

 

Hypoactive Sexual Desire- or I’ve Got a Headache!

April 25, 2010

He: “Are you in the mood?”

She: “Naw, I’ve got a headache!”

If you are a female and you experience these feelings about loss of desire for sexual intimacy, you may have hypoactive sexual desire (HSD).  In other words, you’re rarely in the mood; you neither initiate sex nor seek stimulation. Hypoactive sexual desire is the most common form of female sexual dissatisfaction and occurs when there is a persistent lack of desire or absence of sexual fantasies.

Lack of desire often occurs as a result of problems with your partner.  Communications problems, anger, a lack of trust, a lack of connection and a lack of intimacy can all adversely affect a woman’s sexual response and interest.  If this sounds like you, counseling and therapy with your partner is probably your No. 1 treatment option to overcome HSD.

In addition to psychological causes there are medical causes of HSD.
Many commonly prescribed drugs, such as antihypertensives, antidepressants and birth control pills, interfere with sex drive, arousal and orgasm by affecting the balance of sexual hormones and the transmission of chemical messengers. Antidepressants, known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), combat depression by increasing the production of serotonin in the brain. Although serotonin may decrease depression, it also dampens sexual desire.

The onset of menopause, either surgically produced by removing the ovaries or naturally as a consequence of aging, is characterized by a gradual decline of the hormones estrogen, progesterone and testosterone. Reduced testosterone levels can lead to a decline in libido. Ironically, the conventional hormone replacement regime of estrogen given to relieve menopausal symptoms can make matters worse, because estrogen increases a protein (called steroid hormone-binding globulin) in the blood that binds to testosterone, causing testosterone to become less available to the body.

Depression is also associated with HSD. A common symptom of depression is diminished sex drive, which, in turn, can exacerbate depression. Studies indicate that 12 percent of all women will experience clinical depression at some point in their lives. One of the side effects of the popular antidepressants Prozac, Paxil and Zoloft is loss of libido. Even with a lower-grade form of depression that is not easily recognized because you can function with it. A woman with depression may feel isolated and overwhelmed and withdraw from sex and social activities.

Overcoming HSD
If you’re suffering from loss of libido and think there is a medical basis for your problem, here are some solutions to consider:

Talk to your doctor about testosterone, especially if you have had your ovaries removed, are taking estrogen or under severe stress. Get your testosterone level evaluated and if it is below 20 nanograms per deciliter, consider starting testosterone therapy. Testosterone is central to a woman’s sexual function that no amount of sexual stimulation can make up for its absence.  Using testosterone to treat FSD has not been approved by the FDA, so you’ll need to find a physician open to prescribing it to treat lack of sexual desire. If you are already on hormone replacement therapy for menopausal symptoms, ask your doctor to add testosterone to your regimen.

Switch to medications known to have less effect on sexual function or lower dosages. The antidepressants Prozac, Zoloft and Paxil, of which women are major consumers, cause loss of libido in as many as 60 percent of patients. I suggest asking your doctor to change to an antidepressant that has less sexual side effects like Celexa, Wellbutrin, BuSpar, Serzone or Effexor.

Viagra, the little blue pill used to treat erectile dysfunction in men, may help jump-start your sex life as long as you have the desire to engage in sex and have been stimulated enough for it to take effect,. It’s especially helpful if your lack of desire is related to hysterectomy or menopause. Doctors aren’t exactly sure how Viagra helps rekindle lust but it helps women achieve arousal, which is the phase that comes after desire, by increasing blood flow to the vagina, clitoris and labia.

For more information contact your physician or find a physician who has experience treating HSD.  I also recommend the best-selling book For Women Only by Jennifer and Laura Berman.