Posts Tagged ‘low T’

February 13, 2017

HCG And Testosterone: Double Bang For Your Sex Drive Buck

If you find that your sex drive is in the tank, you have difficulty with erections, that Viagra, Levitra, and Cialis which once worked, are no longer effective, then you may be suffering from low T or low testosterone.  The diagnosis is easily made from a blood test.

If you are like most men, you will find that your manhood and confidence level comes from the area between your belly button and your knees, i.e., your “package”.  It is there in the testicles which are are responsible for making testosterone, the male hormone associated with so many functions including sexual activity, energy level, muscle mass, and even your mood.

Not only does testosterone control so many of these functions, so does hCG or human chorionic gonadotropin.  hCG stimulates the gland at the base of the brain, the pituitary gland to produce more LH or luteinizing hormone (LH) to encourage the testicles to release more testosterone. hCG can be injected and administered to stimulate the right dose of healthy testosterone production.

The benefits of hCG for men include boosting healthy levels of testosterone that’s needed for every biological process to ensure optimal health. Correcting low testosterone levels by using hCG for men can bring on many benefits for men which include:

  • Increase red blood cells
  • Support the cardiovascular system
  • Increases flow of blood and oxygen
  • Healthy body hair growth
  • Weight loss, reduction of fat mass
  • Increased energy levels, endurance, and performance
  • Increase in lean muscle mass and muscle strength
  • Reduced risks of obesity
  • Improved oxidation in the groin area
  • Increase in libido
  • Improved penile growth due to oxidation
  • Proper stimulation to continue boosted sexual desire
  • Proper stimulation to improve endurance and sexual performance
  • Reduced risks of erectile or other sexual dysfunctions
  • Increase in bone density
  • Reduced risks of arthritis-related conditions

 Although hCG is both safe and effective for females and males to use, there are possible side effects that you should be aware of. These include:

  • light-headedness
  • nausea
  • headaches
  • mild fatigue
  • irritation at injection site

More serious side effects are rare and are normally associated with incorrect use of hCG but can include:

  • Swelling of breast tissue in males
  • Depression, irritability and other mood changes
  • Swelling of feet or ankles
  • Early onset of puberty in young boys

Bottom Line: It is crucial to discuss treatment with your doctor to determine if the benefits of using hCG therapy outweigh the possible side effects you may experience and to ensure correct dosing and application of the hCG.

Advertisements

The Link Between Low T (Testosterone) and Depression

August 17, 2015

Most men think of testosterone as the sex hormone responsible for libido or sex drive. Yes, that is true but there is a also link between low testosterone levels and depression.

A study released at this year’s meeting of the Endocrine Society bring important news that men should know: Depression can go along with borderline or low testosterone levels.

A solid 56 percent of testosterone-deficient participants in the study, from the division of endocrinology at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., had significant symptoms or a diagnosis of depression and/or were taking an antidepressant.

The study involved men with testosterone levels of between 200 and 350 nanograms per deciliter. (A level below 300 ng/dL is considered low.)

Although I don’t recommend screening for low testosterone levels, I do suggest that men who are feeling depressed or not as happy as they would like to feel, consider getting their T levels checked.  It’s something your doctor could have missed that is very important to be addressed.

 Discussions about sex and erections

In general, doctors say men don’t like to discuss symptoms of low testosterone – such as erectile dysfunction and reduced sex drive – and that can make getting to the root cause of the condition and treating it harder.

There are symptoms of low testosterone that are specific to low testosterone – like a blood level less than 300 ng/dL, erectile dysfunction, low sperm count, large breasts and osteoporosis – and symptoms that are not, such as weight gain, decreased muscle strength and mood changes. Depression falls into the non-specific category.

If a person is treated for low testosterone and their mood improves, it could be said in hindsight that low testosterone probably caused their depression, but it’s hard to make a definite correlation at the onset.

Testosterone naturally starts to drop after age 30 at a rate of about 1%\year.

Testosterone replacement therapy, which can be given in the form an injection, a patch, a topical gel or a pellet inserted beneath the skin which lasts for 4-6 months.

Low T and Other Medical Problems

There is a correlation between low testosterone and a variety of indicators of poor health – obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, a lack of exercise as well as depression.

There is a well known connection between low T and obesity.  Obesity is the No. 1 cause of low testosterone levels and if you lose 10 to 15 percent of your total weight, your testosterone level will come up. In patients who have a testosterone level of less than 200 ng/dL and in younger patients who have a disease or a cancerous tumor that is causing low testosterone, medication is the obvious choice and usually yields improvement.

Paying attention to decreased testosterone is important because low testosterone raises a man’s risk of death and its decline is markedly accelerated by each co-morbidity.

Low T Or Don’t Let Your Balls Get Deflated!

May 10, 2015

I don’t have an opinion on “Deflate Gate” but I do have an opinion on treatment men who have symptoms of low testosterone with testosterone replacement therapy. This blog will discuss the symptoms of testosterone deficiency, how the diagnosis is confirmed, and the treatment options for low T.

The symptoms of low testosterone include more than just the loss of libido or sex drive. They include lethargy, loss of muscle mass, softening of bones that can result in fractures of the spine and hips, and moodiness and even depression. If you’re concerned that you may have low testosterone, your doctor can check your testosterone level with a simple blood test. If you and your doctor decide that you need treatment, there are several options for testosterone replacement.

The overall goal of testosterone replacement therapy is to increase your testosterone level until it is in the middle of the normal range, which for an adult male should be between 300 and 1,000 nanograms per deciliter (ng/dL). What’s normal for you will depend on your age and your symptoms. Testosterone replacement therapy improves signs of masculinity — deepening the voice, increasing muscle mass, and prompting the growth of pubic and facial hair. It also relieves symptoms of low testosterone such as decreased sex drive, poor erections, low energy, and depression.
You should have testosterone replacement treatment only if you’ve been diagnosed with low testosterone by a doctor and you’re taking it under a doctor’s supervision.
Testosterone replacement therapy can take the form of gels, injections, transdermal patches, and tablets that dissolve under your lip. Each type of testosterone replacement is effective, and each also has advantages, disadvantages, and side effects.
• Testosterone replacement injections. Depo-Testosterone (testosterone cypionate) and Delatestryl (testosterone enanthate) are forms of testosterone replacement therapy given by injection. The advantages of injectable testosterone are that you take it only once every one to two weeks and it’s relatively inexpensive. The disadvantage is that testosterone levels may be difficult to control — too high just after your injection and too low just before the next injection.
• Testosterone replacement gels. Testosterone gel preparations — AndroGel, Axiron, and Testim — are the easiest testosterone therapy to administer and have been shown to be very effective in several studies. Testosterone gels must be applied to the skin on your arms or shoulders about the same time every day. Disadvantages are the higher cost, possible irritation to sensitive skin areas or your eyes, and the possibility that the medication can rub off on someone else.
• Testosterone replacement patch. A testosterone transdermal patch called Androderm is applied to the skin each night and left in place for 24 hours. You’ll need to pick a not-too-hairy spot on an arm, your stomach, or your back, and choose a different spot every night. The main disadvantage to using the patch is skin irritation.
• Testosterone replacement using a tablet under the upper lip. Striant is a testosterone tablet that you place under your upper lip against your gum (a so-called buccal system) and replace every 12 hours. You don’t chew or swallow these tablets, which mold to your upper gum so you can eat and drink normally. Disadvantages of the buccal system include irritation of the gums, toothache, and bitter taste.
• Testosterone pellets. There are pellets that can be inserted under the skin in the doctor’s office. The pellets will last from 4-6 months and then is repeat again.

In addition to the short-term side effects of the different testosterone replacement options, there are longer term side effects common to all testosterone replacement treatments:
• Acne
• Enlargement of the prostate gland
• Breast swelling and tenderness
• Increased urination and fluid retention
• Worsening of breathing problems during sleep, such as sleep apnea
• Weight gain
• Increase in red blood cells

In most cases, testosterone replacement for low testosterone is safe and effective. However, you should not use testosteroone replacement if you have certain medical conditions.
Although there is no evidence that testosterone replacement therapy causes prostate cancer, it can cause an existing cancer to grow more quickly. You shouldn’t take testosterone replacement if you have prostate cancer, male breast cancer, or if your prostate has been diagnosed as being abnormal through a rectal exam or by a blood test. So be sure your doctor rules out these illnesses before starting any treatment.
If you have a medical condition that causes you to produce an excess of red blood cells or if you have untreated obstructed sleep apnea (OSA), you may not be able to take testosterone replacement.

Bottom Line: Low testosterone is a diagnosis that is easily made with a simple blood test. This blood test can be made by your doctor and treated under medical supervision. If you’re being treated for low testosterone, make sure to keep regular doctor appointments and let your doctor know if you have any side effects.

DHEA For Low T: Facts and Warnings

February 27, 2015

I have treated many men with low testosterone and many ask for a solution that does not involve testosterone replacement therapy. This blog will discuss the use of DHEA in men and how effective it may be for solving the symptoms of low T.

DHEA is a hormone that is naturally made by the human body. It can be made in the laboratory from chemicals found in wild yam and soy. However, the human body cannot make DHEA from these chemicals, so simply eating wild yam or soy will not increase DHEA levels.

Athletes and other men use DHEA to increase muscle mass, strength, and energy. But DHEA use is banned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).

DHEA is also used by men for erectile dysfunction (ED) and in men who have low levels of testosterone in order to improve well-being and sexuality.

Like many dietary supplements, DHEA has some quality control problems. Some products labeled to contain DHEA have been found to contain no DHEA at all, while others contained more than the labeled amount.

How does DHEA work?
DHEA is a “parent hormone” produced by the adrenal glands near the kidneys and in the liver. In men, DHEA is also secreted by the testes. It is changed in the body to a hormone called androstenedione. Androstenedione is then changed into the major male hormones including testosterone.

DHEA levels seem to go down as people get older. Some researchers think that replacing DHEA with supplements might prevent some diseases and conditions.

DHEA is Possibly Effective for:
• Aging skin. Some research shows that taking DHEA by mouth increases the thickness and hydration of the top layer of the skin in elderly people. Early research shows that applying DHEA to the skin for 4 months improves the appearance of skin.

DHEA has Insufficient Evidence for:
• Aging. Taking DHEA does not seem to improve body shape, bone strength, muscle strength, insulin sensitivity, or quality of life in people older than 60 who have low DHEA levels.
• Hormone deficiency in men (partial androgen deficiency). Early research suggests that taking 25 mg of DHEA daily for one year might improve mood, fatigue and join pain in older men with hormone deficiency.
• Physical performance. Some research shows that older adults who take DHEA have improved measures of muscle strength. However, other research has found no effect of taking DHEA on muscle strength.
• Sexual dysfunction. Evidence on the effectiveness of DHEA for sexual dysfunction is inconsistent. Taking DHEA by mouth for 24 weeks seems to improve symptoms including erectile dysfunction and overall satisfaction in men. However, it does not seem to be helpful if erectile dysfunction is caused by diabetes or nerve disorders.
• Weight loss. Early evidence suggests that DHEA seems to help overweight older people who are likely to get metabolic syndrome to lose weight. It is not known if DHEA helps younger people to lose weight.

Bottom Line: DHEA is probably not a panacea for low T or a treatment for ED or erectile dysfunction.

Androstenedione: Is It Safe and Effective?

February 27, 2015

I am often asked by men if taking androstenedione is a substitute for testosterone in those who have symptoms of low T and don’t want to take testosterone.

Androstenedione (ASD) is a steroid hormone used by the body to make testosterone and estrogen. Studies on men taking 100-300mg\day have not shown any increase in muscle strength, muscle size, or lean body mass when used for 2-3 months in connection with weight training. ASD does not increasing energy or improve sexual desire and function.

In addition to not being effective ASD is POSSIBLY UNSAFE for most men when taken by mouth. Some side effects experienced by men include reduced sperm production, shrunken testicles, painful or prolonged erections, breast development, behavioral changes, heart disease, and others. ASD can increase the chances of getting cancers of the breast, prostate, or pancreas; and it is poisonous to the liver. Certainly if you have liver disease, don’t take ASD. Even if you don’t have liver disease, it’s best to get liver function tests if you take androstenedione.

Bottom Line: ASD has not shown to be helpful for men with low T or symptoms of low T. ASD may also be dangerous to your health and probably should be avoided by men with low T.

Warning Signs of Low T (testosterone)

February 21, 2015

Millions of American men suffer from low T or low testosterone. Often they suffer in silence and not aware that there are treatment options for this common condition. This blog will discuss some of the most common symptoms that are associated with low T. In the next blog I will discuss the treatment options.

Men like to make jokes about testosterone, but testosterone deficiency is no laughing matter. The latest research suggests that men without enough of the hormone face a higher risk of several serious illnesses, including diabetes, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disease. A simple blood test can reveal whether a man has low T.

Testosterone is what fuels a man’s sex drive. If a man is low on T, he’s likely to have a decrease or loss of his libido. Testosterone is what’s responsible for a man’s sex interest. For men with low testosterone, it’s significantly deficient or completely absent.

A testosterone deficiency can cause significant medical problems, including diabetes, osteoporosis and heart disease Three parts of a man’s body work together to produce the sperm-containing fluid that’s released when a man ejaculates. A man with waning testosterone may notice a sharp decline in his volume of his ejaculate. Men with low testosterone often complain of feeling numbness in their penis and scrotum. They may not be completely numb, but a touch of the penis or scrotom fails to elicit that feeling of electricity needed to spark sexual encounters – and make sex so pleasurable. It’s perfectly normal for a man to feel tired at the end of a busy day. But men with low T feel completely depleted. These men complain of being more tired than they think they ought to be. They seem to run out of gas in the late afternoon or early even. They often remark that “My tank is empty.”

Decreased energy level
In addition to feeling severe fatigue, guys with low testosterone often lose their drive and initiative. Guys who used to be up and at ’em all day long are sidelined on the sofa.

Even if they’re not experiencing clinical depression, men with low testosterone often feel down or blue. They feel less optimistic than they used to feel.

Low testosterone can cause guys to be irritable. Sometimes the problem is more apparent to partners, friends, family members and colleagues – than to the men themselves

It’s not like they become weaklings, but men with low testosterone often feel that they’re not as strong as they once were. Some men actually notice shrinkage in their arm and leg muscles, and in their chest. And if they try to build muscles with weight-lifting, they often find it frustratingly difficult to build muscle mass.

Low testosterone often results not only in reduced muscle mass, but also in increased body fat. Some men add weight around the middle. Others develop gynecomastic, a.k.a as breast development.

Low testosterone can cause them to shrink a bit and feel softer than normal.

The good news about low testosterone is that it’s easily treated – commonly with testosterone skin gels or under-the-skin pellets that release testosterone slowly. And in addition to helping resolve problems with sexuality, mood and appearance, testosterone therapy can help protect men against several serious medical problems, including diabetes, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disease.

Bottom Line: Testosterone deficiency can affect millions of American men. This blog has provided some of the common symptoms of low T and in the next blog I will discuss treatment options.

Everything You Wanted to Know About Low T (Testosterone) But Afraid To Ask

February 21, 2015

Low testosterone is a common condition that impacts the sex life and the quality of life of millions of American men. This blog will discuss the symptoms of low T and what treatment options are available.

Testosterone is a hormone required for male development and is produced primarily in the testicles. It is responsible for building muscle and bone mass as well as sperm production and sex drive. It influences male pattern fat distribution, hair distribution such as a man’s beard, bone density, and red blood cell production.
Lack of or underproduction of testosterone either directly due to decreased production in the testes or indirectly due to lack of stimulation of the testes to produce testosterone by the pituitary gland is called hypogonadism and is a medical condition requiring treatment.
In the normal developing male, testosterone peaks during early adulthood. Once you reach age 30, testosterone levels slowly decline by approximately 1% a year. This is a normal part of aging.
The low limit of testosterone levels in men is about 300 nanograms per deciliter and the upper normal limit is approximately 1000-1200 ng/dl. A low level needs to be investigated further to distinguish it from normal aging.

Low testosterone (low-T) is underproduction or lack of production of testosterone.
Causes of low-T include chronic medical conditions such as diabetes, infections, obesity, or other hormonal conditions.

The symptoms of low-T include: erectile dysfunction (ED), decreased libido, change in sleep patterns, decreased sperm count and motility of sperm, and emotional changes such as depression and despondency.

My take home message is that low-T testing includes linking symptoms with testosterone blood levels.
Treatment options
Treatment options for low-T include different forms of testosterone therapy.
Some of the conditions that can lead to a low level are:
Obesity
Diabetes (type 2)
Chronic medical conditions (especially liver or kidney disease)
Hormonal disorders
Infections

What is the treatment for low testosterone (Low-T)?

Treatment of low testosterone is possible for most men who suffer from the symptoms of low T. There are several ways that testosterone therapy can be administered:
Transdermal (skin patch): Usually applied once a day (for example, Androderm). Tends to be clean and easy to apply. There is an available mouth patch which sticks to the upper gums and is applied twice daily.

Gels: Applied directly to the skin and then absorbed through the skin (for example, Androgel, and Axiron. Dosing is more difficult although these gels are available in single applications packages or premeasured pumps.

Injections: Testosterone can be delivered by direct injection.

Pellets: Pellets can be implanted into the soft tissue and release the testosterone.

I am often asked what treatment options are available that do not require any medications, gels, or injections. My advice is to get enough sleep, keep a healthy weight, and stay active.

Possible side effects and risks of testosterone therapy for the normal aging male include:
Stimulation of growth of the prostate (benign prostatic hypertrophy) and possible growth of existing prostate cancer. Please note that testosterone doesn’t cause prostate cancer, but if you have prostate cancer, testosterone can accelerate the growth of an existing cancer.
Skin reactions
Limiting sperm production and shrinkage of testicles
Over-production of red blood cells (which can be a contributor to a heart attack)
Some studies have implicated testosterone in an increase in cardiovascular events although there are studies that suggest that low testosterone levels places men at risk for heart disease and stroke.

Testosterone therapy is accepted as a treatment for men with symptoms of low T, which is a clearly defined medical condition.

In older adults who have markedly decreased testosterone levels without significant symptoms or who have modestly decreased levels with significant symptoms, testosterone therapy should be considered after a discussion with your doctor about side effects and possible positive effects of therapy.

Bottom Line: Testosterone deficiency is a common problem in middle age and older men. The diagnosis is easily made with a blood test to check the level of testosterone. Treatment can be accomplished with injections, topical gels, or pellets. For more information, speak to your physician.

Low T-Is Clomid a Solution For Men Who Wish To Have Children?

February 19, 2015

I am now seeing many younger men with low testosterone levels who have symptoms of lethargy, decreased libido, and problems with their erections. Upon further testing, many of these men are found to have low testosterone levels or low T. This blog will discuss the use of Clomid for the management of younger men with low T levels.

Whether you are a 30, 50, 80 or even 110 year old man, having low testosterone levels (hypogonadism) is neither fun nor healthy. The symptoms of low testosterone in men range from lack of energy, depressed mood, loss of vitality, muscle loss, muscles aches, low libido, erectile dysfunction, and weight gain.
Low testosterone in men may be caused by problems in the testes (or gonads). This is called primary hypogonadism and can be brought on by the mumps, testicular trauma, or testicular cancer, etc., and is often treated with testosterone replacement therapy.

Traditionally, if low testosterone is diagnosed, testosterone replacement therapy is prescribed, and it most commonly comes in the form of a cream, gel, pellet, patch, and by injection. And although these types of therapy are effective, some methods are better than others, and there are side-effects with all of them. For example, testicular shrinkage, gynecomastia (breast enlargement), low sperm count/sterility, and polycythemia (overproduction of red blood cells) are common side-effects of testosterone replacement therapy.
However, specifically due to the risk of sterility and low sperm count, such testosterone treatments aren’t a good option for men who want to have children. In these young men, clomiphene citrate (or Clomid) and/or human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) have been used for decades to increase testosterone production, increase sperm production, and increase fertility. Both these therapies effectively help stimulate the testes to produce testosterone and thereby increase testosterone levels.

Clomid works by stimulating the pituitary gland to make more LH and there is an increased production of testosterone by the testes. HCG works by mimicking LH, which also increases the release of LH to produce more testosterone in the testes. I caution you that using testosterone in a young man wishing to have more children does the opposite of what clomiphene and HCG do and can shut off the release of LH and thus affect the testicles production of testosterone and affect sperm production.

With traditional testosterone replacement therapy, the brain (hypothalamus and pituitary) gets the message that there is plenty of testosterone being made in the testes, so much so that it doesn’t need to make anymore. Subsequently, the pituitary stops producing LH, and the natural production of testosterone (and sperm) in the testes ceases, which is why traditional testosterone replacement results in testicular shrinkage and low sperm count. Clomiphene citrate and/or HCG do not turn off the testosterone manufacturing plant but rather turn it back on or reboot it. While some hypogonadal men require continuous use of clomiphene, for others it can be used for a 3-6 month time period and then discontinued. And, the checks and balances system is not interrupted, so there aren’t the testosterone replacement side-effects which may occur with tstosterone injections, gels, or pellets.
The 5 Main Reasons Clomiphene Citrate (Clomid) May be a Good Alternative to Testosterone Replacement Therapy in Men with Low Testosterone Due to Secondary Hypogonadism:
1. Clomiphene citrate stimulates the body’s own production of testosterone
2. Clomiphene citrate doesn’t interfere with the body’s checks and balances of testosterone
3. Clomiphene citrate comes as a pill easily administered by mouth
4. Clomiphene citrate is generic and very cheap
5. Clomiphene citrate has little side-effects and low risk of developing these side-effects

Bottom Line: Clomid is a treatment option in young men with low T who wish to continue to have children.

Low T (Testosterone) May Mean No Baby

February 19, 2015

I am often seeing men with symptoms of low testosterone levels who are still planning to have children. These men need to know that the standard treatment of hormone replacement may not apply to those men who are still interested in having children. This blog will discuss the management of men with low T and who wish to continue to have children.

Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) can bring your testosterone levels back to normal and restore your sex drive.
But if you want to have children, there’s one downside to TRT you should know about. It gives you back your sex life, but it might also reduce your ability to father children as long as you’re on it.
Testosterone replacement therapy has a profound impact on a man’s reproductive potential.

Approximately 90% of men can drop their sperm counts to zero while on testosterone. By increasing testosterone, you’re not going to increase fertility.

Testosterone, the hormone produced in the testicles, plays an important role in making sperm. Your brain makes special hormones, called gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH). These hormones signal the testes to make more testosterone, vital for a healthy sperm count. When you’re getting testosterone replacement therapy, testosterone is added into the bloodstream by patches, gels, or other treatment methods such as pellets placed under the skin. Your brain interprets this rise in testosterone levels as a sign that you now have enough testosterone. So it stops sending signals to the testes to make more testosterone. But when your testes don’t make more testosterone, your sperm production goes down.
Therefore, a low sperm count makes it harder to conceive a child. My advice is that if you have any kind of reproductive goal, you should not be using TRT.

If you have low testosterone, one way to improve sperm count is with gonadotropin injections. This stimulates the production of sperm. It may be considered as a way to increase a man’s fertility when your partner are having trouble conceiving a child.
It’s standard practice to check a man’s sperm count when a couple has difficulty getting pregnant. If your sperm count is low, the next step is to measure your testosterone. If it’s below normal, we can then inject the signal to produce more testosterone by giving a gonadotropin.

You should also make sure to follow a lifestyle of regular exercise and a healthy diet if you want to father a child. Overweight and obese men tend to have lower testosterone levels because excess belly fat converts testosterone to estrogen, another hormone that can impact sperm production. Shedding those extra pounds will likely have a positive effect on your fertility. Losing weight can definitely increase testosterone.

Bottom Line: If you have symptoms of low testosterone levels or if you have an abnormal sperm count, hormone replacement with testosterone is not the treatment of choice. You should consider gonadotropin injections as a solution.

Read This To See About Low T (Testosterone)

February 19, 2015

Low testosterone affects millions of American men. Men who suffer from low testosterone have decreased libido, decrease in erections, and lethargy or loss of energy. In this blog I will discuss the importance of testosterone and the treatment options for the diagnosis of low T.

What Is Testosterone and Why Does It Decline?
Testosterone is a hormone produced in the testicles. It’s what puts hair on a man’s chest and responsible for his beard. It’s the force behind his sex drive.
During puberty, testosterone helps build a man’s muscles, deepens his voice, and boosts the size of his penis and testes. In adulthood, it keeps a man’s muscles and bones strong and maintains his interest in sex. In short, it’s what makes a man a man (at least physically).
After age 30, most men begin to experience a gradual decline in testosterone about 1% a year. A decrease in sex drive sometimes accompanies the drop in testosterone, leading many men to mistakenly believe that their loss of interest in sex is simply due to getting older.
The diagnosis of low T is made by a history of the symptoms of low T and a simple blood test that checks the testosterone level. The test is best done in the morning before 10:00 A.M. when the hormone level is the highest.

The bottom of a man’s normal total testosterone range is about 300 nanograms per deciliter (ng/dL). The upper limits are 1,000 to 1,200 ng/dL. A lower-than-normal score on a blood test can be caused by a number of conditions, including:

Injury to the testicles
Testicular cancer or treatment for testicular cancer
Hormonal disorders
Infection
HIV/AIDS
Chronic liver or kidney disease
Type 2 diabetes
Obesity
Some medicines and genetic conditions can also lower a man’s testosterone score. One of the most common drugs associated with low T are the SSRIs which are used to treat depression. Aging does contribute to low scores. In some cases, the cause is unknown.

Risks and Benefits of Testosterone Treatment?

There are also risks. Testosterone treatment can raise a man’s red blood cell count as well as enlarge his breasts. It can also accelerate prostate growth. Men with breast cancer should not receive testosterone treatment. These are uncommon side effects of testosterone treatment.

Men with prostate cancer who have symptoms of low T and have a low and stable PSA can receive testosterone treatment, however, they need to have a PSA and digital rectal exam every 1-2 months while receiving testosterone replacement.

The treatment with testosterone is safe as long as men receive careful monitoring.

Treatment options for low T include injections of testosterone given every two to three weeks, the daily application of gels under the arm or on the abdomen or lower thighs, and pellets inserted under the skin in the doctor’s office which last for 4-6 months.

Bottom Line: Low T is common. Help is available. See your doctor and get a blood testosterone level and if it is low consider hormone replacement therapy.