Posts Tagged ‘male contraception’

The Month of March Means Time For the Prime Cut – Vasectomy

March 8, 2017

Vasectomy remains one of the easiest and cost effective methods of permanent contraception. Many men opt for the outpatient procedure during the month of March so they can chill out and stay glued to the TV for March Madness the month-long college basketball tournament.

In the past few years, there’s an annual spike of vasectomies of approximately 10% in men getting the prime cut shortly before the nationally-televised tournament begins.

The idea is that, with weeks of games to catch up on, they’ll have plenty to keep them occupied and distracted while they recuperate on the sofa for a few days.

I perform the no-scalpel, no-needle vasectomy in my office. The procedure is usually accomplished in 15 minutes. A single, small, less than 1\4 inch opening, is created on the scrotum using a local anesthetic that does not require a needle to render the skin free of any pain or discomfort. The procedure consists of dividing the vas or the tubes located in the scrotum that transports sperm from the testicles to the ejaculation fluid that exits the penis at the time of orgasm. The vas ends are sealed with tiny clips or sutures. By dividing the vas, no sperm can reach the seminal fluid (semen), which is ejaculated from the penis during sex. Since there is no sperm in the semen, a woman’s egg can’t be fertilized – and the procedure has nearly 100% success rate. Most men will not feel any pain during the procedure. In most cases the small opening requires no sutures and the opening will close within 1-2 days after the procedure.

After a vasectomy, a man’s hormones remain normal, and there is no noticeable difference in his ejaculate volume, since sperm make up only a tiny part of the semen.

Many men ask what happens to the sperm produced by the testicles. Because the sperm cannot come out after the vas deferens is cut, like other dead body cells, the sperm disintegrate and are reabsorbed by the body.

After the procedure, men are instructed to go home and lay flat in bed and apply an ice pack or a pack of frozen peas on top of the scrotum for 30 minutes of each hour. However, many will feel some minimal discomfort for a couple of days after the procedure. Most men can return to all activities including sexual intimacy within 5-7 days after the procedure

After a vasectomy, a man’s hormones remain normal, and there is no noticeable difference in a man’s ejaculate volume, since sperm make up only a tiny part (less than 5%) of the semen.

The procedure does not affect the hormones produced in the testicle (testosterone) and therefore, there is no impact on a man’s virility or libido. The only change is in his fertility!

Bottom Line: Vasectomy is an effective and nearly painless means of contraception. So if you want to watch NCAA basketball games in peace and quiet, talk to your doctor about a vasectomy. It’s a cut above the rest!

At Last a Reversible Vasectomy At the Touch of a Button

January 15, 2016

Clemens Bimek is a German inventor of a device to control the sperm flow through a flipping switch.

The device is implanted through surgery and attached to the vas deferens. The device is equipped with a valve which is closed and opened as desired through the skin on the scrotum.

If the valve is in the off position sperm cells are prevented from reaching the seminal fluid. This allows ejaculation no sperm is present in the seminal fluid.

The procedure basically works as a vasectomy. But in comparison with a vasectomy which is only reversible through microscopic surgery the new device makes it reversible with a flip of the switch.

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I believe that clinical trials in humans are underway. Until now the only men who tested the device is the inventor.

At the present the inventor is satisfied with his device so he plans to implant it to 25 men during a clinical trial this year and if everything goes well the device will hopefully get on the market by 2018.

As new information becomes available on this device, I will post a blog on what I find out.

FAQs on Vasectomy

June 27, 2015

Many men want the opportunity to plan the number of children they have – and many women want to finally be able to share the responsibility of contraception with their partner.
So as we mark Men’s Health Month, an awareness campaign on why the snip is not really the snip and why a little more conversation can mean a lot more action. It’s time to get informed.
1. Will vasectomy make me impotent?
A lot of men worry that a vasectomy will lead to a reduction in sexual performance or desire – not surprising really when in some cultures they use the same word for vasectomy and castration! But it can actually improve your sex life because of the peace-of-mind it brings. Having a vasectomy is liberating – imagine never having to worry about unwanted pregnancies again. Instead of frantically rummaging through the bathroom cabinet for a condom, hoping that the mood won’t pass, you can do it whenever you like!
2. What will happen when I ejaculate?
Having a vasectomy does not affect your hormones, ejaculation or orgasm. There’s no noticeable change in what your semen looks like, what it smells like, even what it tastes like. You will still have erections and produce the same amount of semen. The only difference is that the semen won’t contain sperm, as instead of travelling out of your penis, they will be naturally reabsorbed by the body.
3. Does it involve a lengthy operation?
Vasectomies only take 10-15 minutes. The same time as your morning shower or a coffee break from work and unlike the former means you and your partner never have to worry about contraception or unintended pregnancy again.
4. Should I be scared of going under the knife?
It may be known as the snip but at Marie Stopes UK we use a no-scalpel technique. A fast-acting anaesthetic is given before the procedure to numb the area and the sperm-carrying tubes (vas deferens) are sealed using heat. There are no hormones and nothing to insert, no stitches are needed. The procedure is also thought to be less painful and less likely to cause complications than a conventional vasectomy. A form of sedation is also available at some of our centres and can be requested at the time of booking.
5. Will it take ages to recover?
The recovery involves little more than a few days of guilt-free rest and relaxation. You can start having sex as soon it feels comfortable to do so and should be fit to return to work and after a couple of days unless you have a very physically demanding job. If you are uncomfortable, a regular painkiller such as Tylenol or Ibuprofen should do the trick and since you have got your feet up thanks to doctor’s orders, why not book one in to coincide with some good TV? Olympics 2016 anyone?
6. What is the failure rate?
Vasectomy is more than 99% effective. Out of 2,000 men who are sterilized, only one will get a woman pregnant during the rest of his lifetime. However it takes a number of weeks to clear the tubes of sperm after the treatment, so you will need to use another method of contraception until you have been given the all clear. I ask you to ejaculate 15 times and then bring in a specimen for me to exam under the microscope.

7. How risky is it?
Vasectomy is a very common and safe procedure. It is always worth arming yourself with all the facts, but ultimately vasectomy is the safest permanent contraception method on earth. The potential complications are much rarer than for a woman getting her tubes tied and most men experience no problems whatsoever.
8. Can I reverse my vasectomy if I change my mind?
The decision to opt for a vasectomy remains a highly personal one in which the potential risks and benefits must be considered, including the possibility that you may change your mind. Vasectomy reversal is possible but success is not guaranteed and depends largely on how long ago it was done so it is much better to consider it a permanent procedure.

Bottom Line: A vasectomy is the most effective method of permanent contraception. The no-scalpel, no-needle technique is associated with less pain and discomfort, less blood loss, and a quicker return to normal activities than the conventional scalpel plus incision technique.

The Contraception Conundrum-Vasectomy vs. Tubal Ligation

May 28, 2011

Every couple whose family is complete comes to a fork in the road and asks which partner is going to get either a vasectomy or a tubal ligation.  This blog will answer a few questions that may help you make a more informed decision.

First of all both procedures should be considered a permanent form of contraception or sterilization.  A vasectomy isn’t nearly as costly and invasive as the surgery to reverse it. And the odds that you’d be able to father a child again aren’t good enough to count it as a fall-back option down the road, Shih says.

What Could Go Wrong?

A report in a medical journal pointed out that women were 20 times more likely to have a serious problem related to a tubal ligation than men who select to have a vasectomy. In addition, men tend to recover more quickly from a vasectomy.  Most men can return to all activities, including sexual intimacy, 3-4 days after the procedure.   A tubal ligation requires a general anesthesia and incisions into her abdomen.  Both of these can result in significant complications.  However, if a woman is going to have her tubes tied during a planned C-section delivery, the added risk of the tubal is less of a concern.

A vasectomy can be done in the doctor’s office using a local anesthetic and usually takes less than 15 minutes.  The most common problems related to vasectomy include bruising, infection, and inflammation in the epididymis, a sperm-holding structure near the testicle. But each of these seems to occur in less than 5% of cases.  Now that the procedure is performed without an incision but through a tiny puncture wound and does not even require a needle to provide the local anesthesia,

If you’re looking for instant results, a tubal holds the edge: It works immediately. After a vasectomy, a man can still get a woman pregnant until lingering sperm are flushed from his plumbing which usually requires 15 ejaculations.  So it’s crucial for couples to use a backup method of contraception until your doctor says you’re in the clear. And men need to provide a semen sample after a vasectomy that is examined under a microscope to be absolutely certain that no sperm are present.

The Essure and Adiana devices, which are inserted into the Fallopian tubes, also require a checkup to ensure that they’re installed properly and the woman can’t get pregnant.  If you choose these options, be sure you’re going to do the follow-up work. During the first three months after insertion of the device, another form of birth control must be used.

If you’re thinking about your bank account, In terms of cost, a vasectomy is definitely more cost-effective. In general, a tubal costs about three times as much as vasectomy.

Bottom Line:  Most couples are happy when children are planned.  When the time comes to cut off  “reproduction production”, consider either a vasectomy or a tubal ligation.

No-Scalpel Vasectomy-Almost Painless Male Contraception

March 28, 2010

Vasectomy is the process of dividing the vas (the tube that delivers the sperm from the testis to the prostate) in order to prevent conception. It is the most common method of male contraception in this country where about 500,000 vasectomies are done each year. Since vasectomy simply interrupts the delivery of the sperm, it does not change the hormonal function of the testis and sexual drive and ability remain intact. Since most of the semen is composed of fluid from the prostate, the semen will look the same. Vasectomy is thought to be free of known long term side effects, and is considered to be the safest and most reliable method of permanent male sterilization.

The technique of the No-scalpel Vasectomy was developed in 1974 by a Chinese physician, Dr. Li Shunqiang, and has been performed on over eight million men in China.

After injecting the scrotal skin and each vas with a local anesthetic, we use a special vas-fixation clamp to encircle and firmly secure the vas without penetrating the skin. One blade of a sharp forceps or clamp is then used to penetrate the scrotal skin. The tips of the forceps are spread, opening the skin much like spreading apart the weaves of fabric. The vas is thus exposed and then lifted out and occluded by any of the standard techniques, such as cautery or sutures. The second vas is then brought through the same opening and occluded in a similar fashion. The skin wound contracts to a few millimeters and usually does not require suturing.

Compared to the traditional incisional technique, the No-Scalpel Vasectomy usually takes less time, causes less discomfort and may have lower rates of bleeding and infection. Recovery following the procedure is usually complete in two to three days. Hard work or straining (athletic pursuits or heavy lifting) is not recommended for seven days. Most patients should wait to have intercourse for a week after the procedure (You should feel no discomfort).
Common reasons given for having a vasectomy.

  1. You want to enjoy sex without worrying about pregnancy.
  2. You do not want to have more children than you can care for.
  3. Your partner has health problems that might make pregnancy difficult.
  4. You do not want to risk passing on a hereditary disease or disability.
  5. You and your partner don’t want to or can’t use other kinds of birth control.
  6. You want to save your partner from the surgery involved in having her tubes tied and you want to save the expense.

COMMON QUESTIONS ASKED AND ANSWERED ABOUT NO-SCALPEL VASECTOMY
How can I be sure that I want a vasectomy?
You must be absolutely sure that you don’t want to father a child under any circumstances. You must talk to your partner and it certainly is a good idea to make this decision together, consider other kinds of birth control and talk to friends or relatives who may have had a vasectomy. Think about how you would feel if your partner had an unplanned pregnancy. Talk to your doctor, nurse, or family planning counselor.

A vasectomy might not be right for you if you are very young, if your current relationship is not permanent, if you are having a vasectomy just to please your partner and you do not really want it, you are under a lot of stress or you are counting on being able to reverse the procedure at a later time.

How does the vasectomy prevent pregnancy?
Sperm is made in the man’s testicles. The sperm then travels from the testicle through a tube called the vas into the body where it enters the prostate gland. In the prostate, the semen is made and here the sperm mixes with the semen. The prostate is connected to the channel in the penis and hence the sperm and semen are ejaculated. In a vasectomy, the vas or tube is blocked so that sperm cannot reach the prostate to mix with the semen. Without sperm in the semen a man cannot make his partner pregnant.

What is different about a no-scalpel vasectomy?
No scalpel-vasectomy is different from a conventional vasectomy in the way that we get to the tubes or vas to block them from passing sperm out of the testicles. An improved method of anesthesia helps make the procedure less painful. In a conventional vasectomy, the physician may make one or two small cuts in the skin with a knife, and the doctor would then use sutures or stitches to close these cuts at the end of the procedure. In the no-scalpel vasectomy, instead of making two incisions, the doctor makes only one tiny puncture into the skin with a special instrument. This same instrument is used to gently stretch the skin opening so that the tubes can be reached easily. The tubes are then blocked, using the same methods as conventional vasectomy, but because of the lack of scalpel technique there is very little bleeding and no stitches are needed to close the tiny opening. This opening will heal quickly with little or no scarring. No-scalpel vasectomy was introduced in the United States in 1988 and is now used by many doctors in this country who have mastered the technique.

Reasons for having a no-scalpel vasectomy as compared to conventional vasectomy

  1. No incision with a scalpel–only a small puncture with a sharp probe
  2. Usually no stitches
  3. Usually a faster procedure
  4. Usually a faster recovery
  5. Usually less chance of bleeding and other complications
  6. Usually less discomfort
  7. Just as effective as regular vasectomy

Will it hurt?
When the local anesthetic is injected into the skin of the scrotum, vou will feel some discomfort, but as soon as it takes effect you should feel no pain or discomfort. Afterwards, you will be sore for a couple of days and may want to take a mild pain killer such as Tylenol, but the discomfort is usually less with the no-scalpel technique because of less trauma or injury~ to the scrotum and tissues. Also, there are no stitches in most cases. We will provide you with complete instructions about what to do after surgery.

How soon can I go back to work?
You should be able to do routine physical work within 48 hours after your vasectomy, and will be able to do heavy physical labor and exercise within a week.

Will the vasectomy change me sexually?
The only thing that will change is that you will not be able to make your partner pregnant. Your body will continue to produce the same hormones that give you your sex drive and maleness. You will make the same amount of semen. Vasectomy will not change your beard, muscles, sex drive, erections, climaxes or your voice. Some men say that without the worry of accidental pregnancy and the bother of other birth control methods, sex is more relaxed and enjoyable than before.

Will I be sterile right away?
No. After a vasectomy there are some active sperm left in your system. It may take a dozen to two dozen ejaculations to clear the sperm out downstream from where the vasectomy is performed. You and your partner should use other forms of birth control until we have had a chance to check your semen specimens at least twice to make sure that they are free of sperm.

Is the no-scalpel vasectomy safe?
Vasectomy in general is safe and simple. Vasectomy is an operation and all surgery has some risk such as bleeding, infection and pain, but serious problems are unusual. There is always a small chance of the tubes rejoining themselves, and this is the reason that sperm checks are necessary. There have been some controversies in the past about the long-term effects of vasectomy, but to our knowledge there are no long-term risks to vasectomy.

How long will the no-scalpel vasectomy take?
It depends on the surgeon, but on average, the operation lasts between fifteen to thirty minutes.

When can I start having sex again?
As a rule, we suggest waiting a week before having intercourse. Remember, however, that the vasectomy only divides the vas and has no effect on the sperm that are already beyond that point. IT IS IMPORTANT NOT TO HAVE UNPROTECTED INTERCOURSE UNTIL THE ABSENCE OF SPERM FROM THE EJACULATE HAS BEEN CONFIRMED WITH TWO (2) NEGATIVE SPERM CHECKS TWO WEEKS APART.

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