Posts Tagged ‘no scalpel vasectomy’

FAQs on Vasectomy

June 27, 2015

Many men want the opportunity to plan the number of children they have – and many women want to finally be able to share the responsibility of contraception with their partner.
So as we mark Men’s Health Month, an awareness campaign on why the snip is not really the snip and why a little more conversation can mean a lot more action. It’s time to get informed.
1. Will vasectomy make me impotent?
A lot of men worry that a vasectomy will lead to a reduction in sexual performance or desire – not surprising really when in some cultures they use the same word for vasectomy and castration! But it can actually improve your sex life because of the peace-of-mind it brings. Having a vasectomy is liberating – imagine never having to worry about unwanted pregnancies again. Instead of frantically rummaging through the bathroom cabinet for a condom, hoping that the mood won’t pass, you can do it whenever you like!
2. What will happen when I ejaculate?
Having a vasectomy does not affect your hormones, ejaculation or orgasm. There’s no noticeable change in what your semen looks like, what it smells like, even what it tastes like. You will still have erections and produce the same amount of semen. The only difference is that the semen won’t contain sperm, as instead of travelling out of your penis, they will be naturally reabsorbed by the body.
3. Does it involve a lengthy operation?
Vasectomies only take 10-15 minutes. The same time as your morning shower or a coffee break from work and unlike the former means you and your partner never have to worry about contraception or unintended pregnancy again.
4. Should I be scared of going under the knife?
It may be known as the snip but at Marie Stopes UK we use a no-scalpel technique. A fast-acting anaesthetic is given before the procedure to numb the area and the sperm-carrying tubes (vas deferens) are sealed using heat. There are no hormones and nothing to insert, no stitches are needed. The procedure is also thought to be less painful and less likely to cause complications than a conventional vasectomy. A form of sedation is also available at some of our centres and can be requested at the time of booking.
5. Will it take ages to recover?
The recovery involves little more than a few days of guilt-free rest and relaxation. You can start having sex as soon it feels comfortable to do so and should be fit to return to work and after a couple of days unless you have a very physically demanding job. If you are uncomfortable, a regular painkiller such as Tylenol or Ibuprofen should do the trick and since you have got your feet up thanks to doctor’s orders, why not book one in to coincide with some good TV? Olympics 2016 anyone?
6. What is the failure rate?
Vasectomy is more than 99% effective. Out of 2,000 men who are sterilized, only one will get a woman pregnant during the rest of his lifetime. However it takes a number of weeks to clear the tubes of sperm after the treatment, so you will need to use another method of contraception until you have been given the all clear. I ask you to ejaculate 15 times and then bring in a specimen for me to exam under the microscope.

7. How risky is it?
Vasectomy is a very common and safe procedure. It is always worth arming yourself with all the facts, but ultimately vasectomy is the safest permanent contraception method on earth. The potential complications are much rarer than for a woman getting her tubes tied and most men experience no problems whatsoever.
8. Can I reverse my vasectomy if I change my mind?
The decision to opt for a vasectomy remains a highly personal one in which the potential risks and benefits must be considered, including the possibility that you may change your mind. Vasectomy reversal is possible but success is not guaranteed and depends largely on how long ago it was done so it is much better to consider it a permanent procedure.

Bottom Line: A vasectomy is the most effective method of permanent contraception. The no-scalpel, no-needle technique is associated with less pain and discomfort, less blood loss, and a quicker return to normal activities than the conventional scalpel plus incision technique.

Meet the New Orleans magician / urologist who offers a March Madness vasectomy special

March 19, 2015

This article appeared in USA Today Sports
By: NATE SCOTT March 18, 2015 2:19 pm ET

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Dr. Neil “The Whiz” Baum is a New Orleans urologist and part-time magician who, every year at the start of March Madness, offers a vasectomy special to local men. The deal is patients get a scalpel-free vasectomy, a pizza, a Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue, a frozen gel pack, and a bell, so that patients can sit on the couch and ring for someone to “bring them a fresh beer or whatever they need.”

Dr. Baum hopped on the phone with For The Win to discuss his special, its popularity, and his friendship with Chicago Bears running back Matt Forte.

FTW: So I remember when I lived down in New Orleans, I used to hear about your special on the radio, and my friends and I thought it was the funniest thing in the world. Is it still happening?

NB: Oh yes. I have to limit it to about ten a weekend. I could probably do more. I want to make sure I’m not exhausted so I can enjoy the games myself. I limit it to ten each weekend.

FTW: When did this start?

NB: This started about 3 or 4 years ago. [It actually began back in 2009.] I’ve tried to do it for Super Bowl weekend and I’ve tried to do NBA playoffs, but neither worked, and I can’t figure out why.

But Super Bowl weekend, there are too many parties. No one wants to be by themselves. And NBA, I just don’t think it’s as big.

FTW: It’s also a lot more spread out, the NBA playoffs. Where March Madness all happens right in a row, so it’s OK to sit on the couch for a day.

NB: Yep. March Madness. It works every year. The patients love it.

FTW: Am I remembering wrong? Didn’t you at one point give out a bag of frozen peas with this special?

NB: We give out a gel pack now. And it has my name on it. It lasts longer than the frozen peas.

FTW: Are you still doing magic shows as “The Whiz”?

NB: Oh yeah. Absolutely. It’s so cool that I can call up people and say “Oh hi, it’s the Whiz,” and everyone who knows me and has interacted with my magic knows it’s me and gets the double entendre with my name: urologist and a magician. And my license plate is “THE WHIZ.”

FTW: I remember seeing it around New Orleans.

NB: Oh yeah. I gave my daughter Lauren my car once, she was in high school, and she didn’t quite have the confidence she has today. And she would scream: “I don’t want a car that has THE WHIZ on the back!”

FTW: So, to change topics a bit, Matt Forte used to live in your house when he was finishing up his degree at Tulane, right?

NB: Yes, Matt. He lived here for four months after his rookie year. We used to play ping pong. If I lost, I had to do 25 push-ups, and if he lost, he had to do 50 push-ups. And I used to beat him badly, for so many months, his big arms are due to me. [Laughs] No, no. He used to beat me. And the thing with Matt is, you can’t trash talk him. He’s been around all that. You can’t get under his skin, ever.

Achieve Serenity During March Madness With A No-Scalpel, No-Needle Vasectomy

March 13, 2015

March Madness is on the horizon and what an ideal time to have your vasectomy. A few years ago I had a program that generated a lot of enthusiasm for having your vasectomy on one of the weekends of March Madness. (http://neilbaum.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/YOURology-Update-March15.pdf)

What does March Madness and vasectomy have in common? You probably answered, “very little.” However, many men who opt for a vasectomy as a permanent form of contraception are making the decision to have their “prime cut” this week or next week so they can watch the Sweet Sixteen and Final Four while recovering from the 15 minute procedure that can be easily done in the doctor’s office without a scalpel or a needle.

Many male basketball fans may be looking for the perfect excuse to lounge in front of the television all week. Many urologists, including myself, have the perfect solution: Get a vasectomy, the perfect cut!
I am suggesting a “3-Point Shot” plan – one vasectomy, one free pizza, and one weekend excuse to watch college basketball.

It is common for many men to schedule the procedure on a Thursday or Friday so they can have the weekend to relax. While the NCAA tournament lasts longer than the recovery period for a vasectomy – which is usually 2-3 days – this is a good excuse for basketball aficionados to catch a few games while enjoying uninterrupted viewing of basketball games.

So if you want to have a few days to watch the games without interruption, call our office to schedule an appointment. For more information, go to my website, http://www.neilbaum, and watch a video about the procedure and how it can be performed without pain or discomfort.

No baby and no more tuitions: consider the no-scalpel, no-needle vasectomy.

Vasectomy Reversal After A Vasectomy

December 27, 2014

I am often asked if a vasectomy can be reversed. Most often a man divorces, has a new wife and they wish to have children in their new marriage. Can the vasectomy be reversed?

Normally, sperm – the male reproductive cells that fertilize a woman’s egg – are made in the testicle. Sperm travel away from the testicle through a tube called the vas deferens. There is one vas deferens for each testicle. The vas deferens connect with a reservoir where the sperm is held, ready to be leave the reservoir during sex. The sperm also mixes with secretions from the prostate gland that keep the sperm alive. When the sperm is ejaculated, it travels through another tube, the urethra, inside the penis and is deposited in the woman’s vagina at the cervix or the “gatekeeper” to the uterus.

A vasectomy cuts or blocks the vas deferens. Once the vas deferens is blocked, sperm cannot pass from the testicle to the reservoir where semen and secretions from the prostate gland are stored.

After a vasectomy, a man continues to have normal ejaculations of semen, but the ejaculate no longer contains sperm. This can only be discerned if the ejaculate is examined under a microscope.

In a traditional vasectomy, the surgeon uses a scalpel to make small incisions in the skin of the scrotum near the base of the penis to reach both vas deferens. (The scrotum is the fleshy sac that contains the testicles.) The vas deferens are cut or blocked to prevent sperm from traveling. The incisions in the scrotum are then closed with two or three small stitches.

In my practice, I perform the no-scalpel, no-needle vasectomy, which is less painful, has less bleeding and fewer complications. The surgeon makes one or two tine openings about the size of an eraser to access the vas deferens.

The puncture is widened slightly, then the surgeon cuts or blocks each vas deferens.

The puncture site can be covered with a tiny dressing. No stitches are needed.
A vasectomy is intended to produce permanent sterilization. Special microsurgery can reverse a vasectomy and restore fertility in some cases. Vasectomy reversal is a delicate, expensive procedure. And it is only successful in about 60 to 70 percent of cases.

No-Scalpel, No-Needle Vasectomy-The Prime Cut

December 8, 2014

Most practices are impacted at the end of the year by the rush of patients who have met their deductibles. In Urology, aside from patients wanting to get stones busted (Lithotripsy), scrotal issues addressed, and an occasional prostate; by far and away, the number of vasectomies that are done in December is at least 4-5 times the number that our offices perform during any of the other months. The following is intended for any questions that you may have regarding vasectomy and is based on more than 5,000 vasectomies I have performed over 30 years of urologic practice.

Vasectomy Facts

1. Average time for the procedure is 6-8 minutes.

2. Patients are not given any narcotics as Aleve or Advil are sufficient for any discomfort. Less than 1 in 100 patients require a narcotic prescription.

3. Patients are offered the option of Valium 20 mg. to take prior to the procedure with instructions to have a driver.

4. 95% of the men who come in for a vasectomy consult go on to have the procedure.

5. The biggest fear is of someone they do not know holding sharp instruments and working on their scrotum while they are awake. Because of proper education, including an article given to all patients prior to have the procedure, men need not worry about the vasectomy impacting their sexual function.

6. The sperm make up only 5% of the ejaculatory volume so no noticeable change in the semen volume.

7. Rarely men will be seen following the procedure for some discomfort and typically, it is related to some inflammation or small hematoma and Tylenol or Advil are more than adequate.

8. Because of the way the procedure is performed, it is very rare to see a scrotal hematoma, which can occur and creates a small swelling of the scrotum. This occurs most often in men who do not heed the advice of going home, lying down and keeping ice on the incision.

10. Occasionally, a question is asked regarding sperm banking and this can be done in a facility in one of the infertility clinics in the area.

11. Vasectomy reversal is a formal surgical procedure that can take anywhere from 1-1/2 to 2 hours to perform. Through a scrotal incision, the testicle and spermatic cords are brought into the surgical field. The ends of the vas identified, freshened up and scar tissue removed and an operating microscope is used to perform a surgical closure using typically anywhere from 7-0 to 9-0 permanent suture. Success rates for vasectomy reversal is approximately 75% within the first 10 years and drops to about 30% after 10 years.

Anatomy

The vas deferens is a small tube approximately 3 mm (1\8 inch) in diameter that carries sperm from the testicle up into the body where it unites with the seminal vesicles and stores the sperm until ejaculation when the semen is deposited in the vagina in order to fertilize an egg and start the process of conception.

No Scalpel Procedure

Following anesthetizing the skin in the mid-section of the scrotum with a device that deposits the anesthetic without the use of a needle. Then a single puncture is made about 1\4 of inch in length in the middle of the scrotum. Each vas is occluded with very small titanium clip. No sutures or stitches are required. The patient lies on the table for a few minutes and then goes home and lays flat in bed for a few hours using ice over the scrotum for 45 minutes out of every hour until going to sleep.

Office visits

A vasectomy consultation is always performed before the procedure for a number of reasons:

1. To explain the procedure to the patient.

2. To allay fears, address misconceptions, and put the patient at ease.

3. To ensure anatomically that there are no problems with performing the vasectomy which include an extremely large patient with small scrotum, prior evidence of infection, and to screen for extremely anxious patients who probably would not tolerate the procedure being performed in the office under local anesthesia.

4. Pre-procedure instructions are given including the need to shave all the hair on the scrotum preferably the night before.

5. Men are given a prescription for Valium, which they should take 30-45 minutes before the procedure. If the man takes the Valium pill, then he will need a ride home as he should not drive a car after using Valium.

6. Post-procedure instructions are given including the need to go home and stay off his feet and keep ice on for two days. Sexual intercourse can begin typically 3-4 days post- procedure. Additionally the men are instructed to return for a follow-up visit. It takes approximately 15 ejaculations to clear all sperm from the portion of the vas above the legation of the vas.

6. Typically, a man makes a follow-up appointment at 6-8 weeks although the record is one week, but he wasn’t married! They are also informed of the 1 in 1500 chance of reconnection of the vas.

Summary

The majority of men have the procedure performed on Thursday or Friday, spend the weekend resting with ice, return to work on Monday and are back to regular activity including intercourse by Wednesday or Thursday of the following week.

Bottom Line: Having done more than 5,000 vasectomies, I can think of very few men who would not be willing to undergo the procedure again or recommend it to a friend. Certainly, in comparison to tubal ligation, which requires general anesthetic, it is a much simpler, less costly and less painful form of sterilization.
Don’t hesitate to give me a call if you have any questions about vasectomy or go to my website to view a video on vasectomy: http://neilbaum.com/videos/vasectomy

The Contraception Conundrum-Vasectomy vs. Tubal Ligation

May 28, 2011

Every couple whose family is complete comes to a fork in the road and asks which partner is going to get either a vasectomy or a tubal ligation.  This blog will answer a few questions that may help you make a more informed decision.

First of all both procedures should be considered a permanent form of contraception or sterilization.  A vasectomy isn’t nearly as costly and invasive as the surgery to reverse it. And the odds that you’d be able to father a child again aren’t good enough to count it as a fall-back option down the road, Shih says.

What Could Go Wrong?

A report in a medical journal pointed out that women were 20 times more likely to have a serious problem related to a tubal ligation than men who select to have a vasectomy. In addition, men tend to recover more quickly from a vasectomy.  Most men can return to all activities, including sexual intimacy, 3-4 days after the procedure.   A tubal ligation requires a general anesthesia and incisions into her abdomen.  Both of these can result in significant complications.  However, if a woman is going to have her tubes tied during a planned C-section delivery, the added risk of the tubal is less of a concern.

A vasectomy can be done in the doctor’s office using a local anesthetic and usually takes less than 15 minutes.  The most common problems related to vasectomy include bruising, infection, and inflammation in the epididymis, a sperm-holding structure near the testicle. But each of these seems to occur in less than 5% of cases.  Now that the procedure is performed without an incision but through a tiny puncture wound and does not even require a needle to provide the local anesthesia,

If you’re looking for instant results, a tubal holds the edge: It works immediately. After a vasectomy, a man can still get a woman pregnant until lingering sperm are flushed from his plumbing which usually requires 15 ejaculations.  So it’s crucial for couples to use a backup method of contraception until your doctor says you’re in the clear. And men need to provide a semen sample after a vasectomy that is examined under a microscope to be absolutely certain that no sperm are present.

The Essure and Adiana devices, which are inserted into the Fallopian tubes, also require a checkup to ensure that they’re installed properly and the woman can’t get pregnant.  If you choose these options, be sure you’re going to do the follow-up work. During the first three months after insertion of the device, another form of birth control must be used.

If you’re thinking about your bank account, In terms of cost, a vasectomy is definitely more cost-effective. In general, a tubal costs about three times as much as vasectomy.

Bottom Line:  Most couples are happy when children are planned.  When the time comes to cut off  “reproduction production”, consider either a vasectomy or a tubal ligation.

The Prime Cut-A Vasectomy For When You Are Done Having Kids

May 28, 2011

Though their circumstances vary widely, millions of men have asked themselves two questions: Do I have all the kids I want and can afford? If so, should I get a vasectomy?

Men have one successful option when they want to permanently turn off their baby-creating machine – a vasectomy. A doctor, usually a urologist, cuts and seals off the two tubes that allow sperm to travel from the testicles to vagina and ultimately to combine with an egg and produce a baby.

At the present time only 6% of couples wishing to have a sterilization procedure select a vasectomy.

Reasons that men choose to have the procedure include wanting to avoid difficult pregnancies if their partner has had previous problems during pregnancy, or if the partner had problems using hormonal contraception. Many men are now feeling that a vasectomy is their chance to contribute. 

There are nearly 400,000 vasectomies performed each year in the United States.  The procedure can now be accomplished without an incision and even without a needle to inject the local anesthetic.  The procedure takes 15 minutes and most men can resume all activities, including sexual intimacy, in 2-3 days after the procedure.

For more information, please go to my webiste, www.neilbaum.com or http://www.neilbaum.com/the-vasectomy-procedure.html for an article and a video on the subject.  

OH MY GOSH!!!!!!!! (once again!)

May 14, 2010

I opened the paper

And who do I see?

None other than

The King of Pee.

Peas and Pizza–

Just about the best

And the SI* swimsuit edition

Would put the patient

UP for the test!

As he entertains himself

With SI (and his new plot in life)

He will have to give thought

Of how to appease his wife.

Oh Doctor Whiz

You`ve done it again:

Microwaves and vasectomies

Show you`re the KING PIN!!!!!

*Sports Illustrated

Contributed by the Wiz’s dear friend  Eugenia Lind

No-Scalpel Vasectomy-Almost Painless Male Contraception

March 28, 2010

Vasectomy is the process of dividing the vas (the tube that delivers the sperm from the testis to the prostate) in order to prevent conception. It is the most common method of male contraception in this country where about 500,000 vasectomies are done each year. Since vasectomy simply interrupts the delivery of the sperm, it does not change the hormonal function of the testis and sexual drive and ability remain intact. Since most of the semen is composed of fluid from the prostate, the semen will look the same. Vasectomy is thought to be free of known long term side effects, and is considered to be the safest and most reliable method of permanent male sterilization.

The technique of the No-scalpel Vasectomy was developed in 1974 by a Chinese physician, Dr. Li Shunqiang, and has been performed on over eight million men in China.

After injecting the scrotal skin and each vas with a local anesthetic, we use a special vas-fixation clamp to encircle and firmly secure the vas without penetrating the skin. One blade of a sharp forceps or clamp is then used to penetrate the scrotal skin. The tips of the forceps are spread, opening the skin much like spreading apart the weaves of fabric. The vas is thus exposed and then lifted out and occluded by any of the standard techniques, such as cautery or sutures. The second vas is then brought through the same opening and occluded in a similar fashion. The skin wound contracts to a few millimeters and usually does not require suturing.

Compared to the traditional incisional technique, the No-Scalpel Vasectomy usually takes less time, causes less discomfort and may have lower rates of bleeding and infection. Recovery following the procedure is usually complete in two to three days. Hard work or straining (athletic pursuits or heavy lifting) is not recommended for seven days. Most patients should wait to have intercourse for a week after the procedure (You should feel no discomfort).
Common reasons given for having a vasectomy.

  1. You want to enjoy sex without worrying about pregnancy.
  2. You do not want to have more children than you can care for.
  3. Your partner has health problems that might make pregnancy difficult.
  4. You do not want to risk passing on a hereditary disease or disability.
  5. You and your partner don’t want to or can’t use other kinds of birth control.
  6. You want to save your partner from the surgery involved in having her tubes tied and you want to save the expense.

COMMON QUESTIONS ASKED AND ANSWERED ABOUT NO-SCALPEL VASECTOMY
How can I be sure that I want a vasectomy?
You must be absolutely sure that you don’t want to father a child under any circumstances. You must talk to your partner and it certainly is a good idea to make this decision together, consider other kinds of birth control and talk to friends or relatives who may have had a vasectomy. Think about how you would feel if your partner had an unplanned pregnancy. Talk to your doctor, nurse, or family planning counselor.

A vasectomy might not be right for you if you are very young, if your current relationship is not permanent, if you are having a vasectomy just to please your partner and you do not really want it, you are under a lot of stress or you are counting on being able to reverse the procedure at a later time.

How does the vasectomy prevent pregnancy?
Sperm is made in the man’s testicles. The sperm then travels from the testicle through a tube called the vas into the body where it enters the prostate gland. In the prostate, the semen is made and here the sperm mixes with the semen. The prostate is connected to the channel in the penis and hence the sperm and semen are ejaculated. In a vasectomy, the vas or tube is blocked so that sperm cannot reach the prostate to mix with the semen. Without sperm in the semen a man cannot make his partner pregnant.

What is different about a no-scalpel vasectomy?
No scalpel-vasectomy is different from a conventional vasectomy in the way that we get to the tubes or vas to block them from passing sperm out of the testicles. An improved method of anesthesia helps make the procedure less painful. In a conventional vasectomy, the physician may make one or two small cuts in the skin with a knife, and the doctor would then use sutures or stitches to close these cuts at the end of the procedure. In the no-scalpel vasectomy, instead of making two incisions, the doctor makes only one tiny puncture into the skin with a special instrument. This same instrument is used to gently stretch the skin opening so that the tubes can be reached easily. The tubes are then blocked, using the same methods as conventional vasectomy, but because of the lack of scalpel technique there is very little bleeding and no stitches are needed to close the tiny opening. This opening will heal quickly with little or no scarring. No-scalpel vasectomy was introduced in the United States in 1988 and is now used by many doctors in this country who have mastered the technique.

Reasons for having a no-scalpel vasectomy as compared to conventional vasectomy

  1. No incision with a scalpel–only a small puncture with a sharp probe
  2. Usually no stitches
  3. Usually a faster procedure
  4. Usually a faster recovery
  5. Usually less chance of bleeding and other complications
  6. Usually less discomfort
  7. Just as effective as regular vasectomy

Will it hurt?
When the local anesthetic is injected into the skin of the scrotum, vou will feel some discomfort, but as soon as it takes effect you should feel no pain or discomfort. Afterwards, you will be sore for a couple of days and may want to take a mild pain killer such as Tylenol, but the discomfort is usually less with the no-scalpel technique because of less trauma or injury~ to the scrotum and tissues. Also, there are no stitches in most cases. We will provide you with complete instructions about what to do after surgery.

How soon can I go back to work?
You should be able to do routine physical work within 48 hours after your vasectomy, and will be able to do heavy physical labor and exercise within a week.

Will the vasectomy change me sexually?
The only thing that will change is that you will not be able to make your partner pregnant. Your body will continue to produce the same hormones that give you your sex drive and maleness. You will make the same amount of semen. Vasectomy will not change your beard, muscles, sex drive, erections, climaxes or your voice. Some men say that without the worry of accidental pregnancy and the bother of other birth control methods, sex is more relaxed and enjoyable than before.

Will I be sterile right away?
No. After a vasectomy there are some active sperm left in your system. It may take a dozen to two dozen ejaculations to clear the sperm out downstream from where the vasectomy is performed. You and your partner should use other forms of birth control until we have had a chance to check your semen specimens at least twice to make sure that they are free of sperm.

Is the no-scalpel vasectomy safe?
Vasectomy in general is safe and simple. Vasectomy is an operation and all surgery has some risk such as bleeding, infection and pain, but serious problems are unusual. There is always a small chance of the tubes rejoining themselves, and this is the reason that sperm checks are necessary. There have been some controversies in the past about the long-term effects of vasectomy, but to our knowledge there are no long-term risks to vasectomy.

How long will the no-scalpel vasectomy take?
It depends on the surgeon, but on average, the operation lasts between fifteen to thirty minutes.

When can I start having sex again?
As a rule, we suggest waiting a week before having intercourse. Remember, however, that the vasectomy only divides the vas and has no effect on the sperm that are already beyond that point. IT IS IMPORTANT NOT TO HAVE UNPROTECTED INTERCOURSE UNTIL THE ABSENCE OF SPERM FROM THE EJACULATE HAS BEEN CONFIRMED WITH TWO (2) NEGATIVE SPERM CHECKS TWO WEEKS APART.

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