Posts Tagged ‘nutrition’

Diet and Exercise May Reduce Risk of Cancer

January 21, 2017

There isn’t a day that goes by that the Internet or the print media isn’t bombarding readers with a new diet that prevents cancer.

Every day, there are headlines that bombard readers with various diets that purportedly prevent cancer: “The Diet That Stops Cancer” and “Eating Your Way Out of Cancer.” But what do the hard data really say about lifestyle choices preventing cancer?  Studies have shown that the combination of healthy eating, not smoking, and regular exercise can reduce the risk of heart disease by 80 percent and of stroke and some cancers by 70 percent.

Although no diet has received conclusive evidence of presenting cancer, there are lifestyle choices such as exercise that support conclusions that they can serve as deterrent of cancer.  Even the American Cancer society recommends avoid being overweight and includes being physically active for at least 30 minutes every day.  They also suggest eating a mostly plant-based diet; limiting red meats and avoiding processed meats; limiting alcoholic drinks (two glasses of wine a day for men and one glass for women); and to protect against cancer (Table 1). Other recommendations include avoid sugary drinks, limit consumption of processed foods and eat more vegetables, whole grains, and legumes such as beans.  Limit salt intake to 1.5 grams per day and limit consumption of salty foods, chips, pretzles, smoked or cured meats like salami, baloney, and beef jerky.

Other Cancer Prevention Recommendations

To prevent breast cancer, the ACS recommends at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity per week, alcohol intake of one or fewer drinks per day, and maintaining a body mass index (BMI) less than 25 kg/m2. In a study of 2905 women at high-risk for breast cancer, adherence to these three recommendations reduced the risk for breast cancer by 44%.

Perhaps this shouldn’t be all that surprising, given that BMI itself is a risk factor for cancer. Too much body fat triggers insulin resistance, raising levels of insulin and growth factors that promote cancer. Fat also increases estrogen production, which can fuel some cancers, and fat secretes enzymes that promote inflammation.

Numerous medical studies have concluded that avoiding adult weight gain confers protection against certain types of cancer, particularly among nonusers of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). The study found that for each 5-kg increase in adult weight gain, the relative risk was increased 11% for postmenopausal breast cancer among no or low HRT users; 39% and 9% for postmenopausal endometrial cancer among HRT nonusers and users, respectively; and 13% for postmenopausal ovarian cancer among no or low HRT users. For each 5-kg increase in men, the risk for colon cancer increased by 9%. The relative risk for kidney cancer comparing highest and lowest level of adult weight gain was 1.42.

In addition to lowering the risk of cancer, eating a diet that is high in fruits and vegetables is associated with a lower risk for all-causes of death and lower risk of dying of cardiovascular causes such as heart disease or stroke.

Bottom line on diet and exercise and cancer prevention:  Weight gain, lack of exercise, and high alcohol intake are the key factors for leading a healthy lifestyle and decreasing the risk of cancer.

Water, Water Everywhere-How Much Do We Need To Drink?

August 30, 2015

I graduated from medical school in 1968 with the advice to my patients to drink 8 glasses of water a day. If there is one health myth that will not die, it is this: You should drink eight glasses of water a day. It’s just not true. There is no science behind it. Yet the number of people who carry around expensive bottled water seems to be growing each day. A recent White House policy declared that 40 percent of Americans drink less than half of the recommended amount of water daily

There has been a fear that otherwise healthy adults and children are walking around dehydrated, even that dehydration has reached epidemic proportions.

Let’s put these claims under scrutiny.

There was a myth that people should drink at least eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day. The source of this myth was a 1945 Food and Nutrition Board recommendation that said people need about 2.5 liters or about two quarts of water a day. This report also pointed out that most of this quantity is contained in prepared foods. Water is present in fruits and vegetables. It’s in juice, it’s in beer, it’s even in tea and coffee. Before anyone writes me to tell me that coffee is going to dehydrate you, research shows that’s not true either.

Although I recommended water as the best beverage to consume, it’s certainly not your only source of hydration. You don’t have to consume all the water you need through drinks. You also don’t need to worry so much about never feeling thirsty. The human body is finely tuned to signal you to drink long before you are actually dehydrated.

Contrary to many stories you may hear, there’s no real scientific proof that, for otherwise healthy people, drinking extra water has any health benefits. For instance, reviews have failed to find that there’s any evidence that drinking more water keeps skin hydrated and makes it look healthier or wrinkle free.

Other studies fail to find benefits in kidney function or all-cause mortality when healthy people increase their fluid intake.

One possible exception is that drinking water may lead to the prevention of the recurrence of some kinds of kidney stones.

Bottom Line: There is no formal recommendation for a daily amount of water people need. That amount obviously differs by what people eat, where they live, how big they are and what they are doing. In New Orleans with high temperatures and high humidity, consuming more water especially when working or playing outside in the summer is probably a good idea.

Healthy Eating For Middle Aged Men

March 9, 2014

Middle age men are making an effort to improve their lifestyles. They are exercising more than the previous generation and they are making an effort to practice good nutrition. This article will discuss the best foods for the baby boomer generation.

Women in middle age experience menopause, which is the abrupt cessation of the decrease in estrogen production by their ovaries. Men have their own more subtle changes as they age called andropause. With andropause come slowly decreasing testosterone levels, lower metabolism, an enlarged prostate, and an increased risk for cardiovascular problems and other diseases. These changes can affect your sex life, mood, ability to sleep, concentration, and prostate health.
Eating the right foods can help increase your energy level, lower your cholesterol and blood pressure and even improve your sex life. Eating a variety of healthful foods will strengthen your immunity and help you age better. Eating plenty of fiber is also important to keep your digestive track running regularly and decrease the risk of colon cancer.
Nuts

Nuts are some of the best foods for men over 50 for many reasons. Nuts are good for your heart health, but they also pack other benefits in a tiny space. Almonds can improve your sleep and mood. Brazil nuts are helpful for proper prostate functioning. Walnuts have anti-inflammatory properties that are good for muscles. Pistachio nuts can help lower cholesterol, protect your heart, and improve erectile function.
Cruciferous Vegetables

Cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, broccoli sprouts, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, kale, bok choy, cabbage, radishes, and others are some of the best foods for men over 50. They help prevent bladder cancer and other types of cancer (especially when eaten raw) and they are high in fiber. Don’t believe us? Here are 10 reasons to eat broccoli and some studies on how eating vegetables can reduce prostate cancer progression.
Berries

Aging men should try to eat one cup of berries per day. All berries are good for you, but blueberries and acai berries are highest in antioxidants and are especially good for the health of your brain. Feeling forgetful? Pop some berries. Berries are high in vitamin C and fiber. Berries and other foods like apples and tea are rich in flavonoids called anthrocyanins. A study from Harvard found anthrocyanins to be especially beneficial to men in preventing Parkinson’s. Men, but not women, who ate the most of this flavonoid were 40% less likely to develop Parkinson’s than men who ate the least about.
Red and Orange Fruits and Vegetables

Red and orange fruits and vegetable are so good for you. They are high in beta-carotene, which is a precursor to vitamin A, which can help your immune system fight cancer and other diseases. Red and orange bell peppers, pomegranates, tomatoes, beets, carrots, sweet peppers, and chili peppers all top the list for the best foods for men over 50. Chili peppers can help improve your metabolism, work as blood thinners, and even increase your mood by releasing endorphins. Sweet potatoes have been shown to prevent diabetes and many other diseases such as Alzheimers, Parkinsons, cancer, heart attack, and stroke. They even help with skin health and wrinkles. Beets and other vegetables high in nitrates may improve sexual health, and carrots are good for your skin and for fighting cancer and inflammation. You can’t beat lycopene health benefits for men. Lycopene from tomatoes and watermelon help to help boost sexual health while promoting a normal prostate size and fighting against prostate cancer.
Beans and Lentils

Filled with fiber and protein, beans and lentils make a great meat substitute. Like berries, black beans contain anthrocyanins, which are especially good for brain health. People who eat beans at least three times a week experienced a 33% reduced risk of colon polyps (which often lead to colon cancer).
Green Leafy Vegetables

Dark green vegetables are good for your brain health and sexual health. Spinach is high in lutein and can even increase blood flow to the penis, helping with erectile function. Green leafy vegetables are high in folate and potassium, plus they are a great nondairy source for calcium, which is good for your bones. A study reported that that men who ate greater amounts of leafy green vegetables had a 34% reduced risk of aggressive prostate cancer.
Whole Grains

Whole grains are high in fiber and protein too. Oatmeal is one of the best cholesterol lowering foods because oatmeal is high in fiber. The fiber found in whole grains such as oatmeal, barley, brown rice, and wheat calms inflamed tissues and keep the colon and heart healthy. Consider adding quinoa, which is technically a grain-like seed that is a source of complete protein, to your diet of whole grains.
Foods Rich in Omega 3

Some of the best foods for men over 50 are foods high in omega-3 fatty acids for heart, prostate, and brain health. This includes certain fatty fish like wild salmon, tuna, and sardines, and non-fish foods like flaxseed and walnuts. Flaxseed is a high-fiber mood lifter and it improves heart health. Sprinkle flaxseed on yogurt, salad, or oatmeal. When shopping for fish, buy only wild salmon. There are other benefits to eating these fish as well. Tuna is high in niacin for your heart and selenium. It preserves elastin for tighter skin. Some foods that contain omega-3 fatty acids and also contain the mineral zinc are oysters and Alaskan king crab legs. Zinc plays a role in prostate health and sexual health.
Green Tea

Drinking several cups of green tea per day helps prevent cancers such as prostate cancer, plus it provides cardiovascular benefits by improving blood flow and it helps lower cholesterol. In addition, green tea is good for your brain.
Heart-Healthy Oils

The best foods for men over 50 include heart-healthy oils such as olive oil, seeds, nuts, and avocado. Avocados are high in monounsaturated fat and have the ability to help lower cholesterol and reduce inflammation for cells and joints. Heart-healthy oils also are good for prostate health. Some studies on heart healthy food for prostate cancer demonstrated that these foods slowed progression of cancer and increased survival.
Healthy Spices for Men over 50

There are spices for your food that are also available in supplement form. Curcumin, which is derived from turmeric, is good for fighting tumors and it has anti-inflammatory properties that are beneficial for rheumatoid arthritis, prostatitis, and other inflammatory conditions. Cinnamon has many health benefits for aging men as well, including regulating blood sugar lowering cholesterol, helping relieve arthritis pain, and boosting cognitive function and memory. Garlic is another flavoring for food that is one of the best foods for men over 50 because it can lower risk for benign enlargement of the prostate gland.

Bottom Line:
After age 50, it is imperative to your health to develop a healthy lifestyle, which includes regular exercise and paying attention to your nutrition. You will feel better, think better, and fight disease better if you give your body the nutrients and tools it needs to work its best.
This article was inspired by an article on Best Foods For Men Over Age 50.

– See more at: http://www.prostate.net/2013/nutrition/best-foods-for-men-over-50/#sthash.HTb3i2SK.dpuf

Prevent Cancer Recurrence-Eat Right and Exercise a Lot

July 25, 2012

A recent study from Ccancer Journal for Clinicians (April 26, 2012) indicated that prostate cancer patients and those with other forms of cancer should maintain a healthy weight, exercise, and each a healthy diet in order to decrease the risk of recurrence.  Strong evidence shows that both healthy diet and exercise can prevent cancers from recurring.  So if you have cancer and our recovering from cancer surgery, radiation or chemotherapy you need to be plenty of fruits and vegetables, decrease your consumption of red meat, limit your carbohydrate intake, and exercise at least 20 minutes a day 4 days a week.

 

Prevent Cancer Recurrence-Eat Right and Exercise a Lot

July 25, 2012

A recent study from Ccancer Journal for Clinicians (April 26, 2012) indicated that prostate cancer patients and those with other forms of cancer should maintain a healthy weight, exercise, and each a healthy diet in order to decrease the risk of recurrence.  Strong evidence shows that both healthy diet and exercise can prevent cancers from recurring.  So if you have cancer and our recovering from cancer surgery, radiation or chemotherapy you need to be plenty of fruits and vegetables, decrease your consumption of red meat, limit your carbohydrate intake, and exercise at least 20 minutes a day 4 days a week.

 

The Right Way To Eat Fruit

September 28, 2011

We all think eating fruit means just buying fruit, cutting it up and popping it into our mouths. It’s not that easy. It’s important to know how and when to eat fruit.
Why is fruit important? Eating fruit like that plays a major role in detoxifying your system, supplying you with a great deal of energy for weight loss and other life activities.

So What is the correct way to eat fruit? Begin by not eating fruit after a meal. Fruit is meant to be eaten on an empty stomach. Let’s say you eat two slices of bread, then a slice of fruit. The slice of fruit is ready to go straight through the stomach into the intestines, but it’s prevented from doing so. In the meantime, the whole meal rots and ferments, and turns to acid. The minute the fruit comes into contact with the food in the stomach, and digestive juices, the entire mass of food begins to spoil.
Eat your fruit on an empty stomach, or before your meal! You’ve heard people complain: Every time I eat watermelon I burp, when I eat durian my stomach bloats, when I eat a banana I feel like running to the toilet, etc. This will not happen if you eat the fruit on an empty stomach. Fruit mixes with the putrefying other food and produces gas. Hence, you bloat!
There’s no such thing as some fruits, like orange and lemon are acidic, because ALL fruit becomes alkaline in our body. If you have mastered the correct way of eating fruit, you have the Secret of Beauty, Longevity, Health, Energy, Happiness and normal weight.
When you need to drink fruit juice drink only fresh fruit juice, NOT the concentrated juice from the cans. Don’t drink juice that has been heated. Don’t eat cooked fruit; you don’t get the nutrients at all. You get only the taste. Cooking destroys ALL of the vitamins.
Eating a whole fruit is better than drinking the juice. If you should drink the juice, drink it mouthful by mouthful slowly, because you must let it mix with your saliva before swallowing it. You can go on a 3-day fruit-fast to cleanse your body. Eat fruit and drink fruit juice for just 3 days, and you will be surprised when your friends say how radiant you look!
KIWI: Tiny but mighty, and a good source of potassium, magnesium, vitamin E and fiber. Its vitamin C content is twice that of an orange!
AN APPLE a day keeps the doctor away? Although an apple has a low vitamin C content, it has antioxidants and flavonoids which enhances the activity of vitamin C, thereby helping to lower the risk of colon cancer, heart attack and stroke.
STRAWBERRY: Protective Fruit. Strawberries have the highest total antioxidant power among major fruits and protect the body from cancer-causing, blood vessel-clogging free radicals.
EATING 2 – 4 ORANGES a day may help keep colds away, lower cholesterol, prevent and dissolve kidney stones, and reduce the risk of colon cancer.
WATERMELON: Coolest thirst quencher. Composed of 92% water, it is also packed with a giant dose of glutathione, which helps boost our immune system. Also a key source of lycopene, the cancer-fighting oxidant. Also found in watermelon: Vitamin C and Potassium.
GUAVA & PAPAYA: Top awards for vitamin C. They are the clear winners for their high vitamin C content. Guava is also rich in fiber, which helps prevent constipation. Papaya is rich in carotene, good for your eyes.
Drinking Cold water after a meal = Cancer! Can you believe this? For those who like to drink cold water, this applies to you. It’s nice to have a cold drink after a meal, however, the cold water will solidify the oily stuff that you’ve just consumed, which slows digestion. Once this ‘sludge’ reacts with the acid, it will break down and be absorbed by the intestine faster than the solid food. It will line the intestine. Very soon, this will turn into fats and lead to cancer. It is best to drink hot soup or warm water after a meal.
A serious note about heart attacks. Women should know that not every heart attack symptom is going to be the left arm hurting. Be aware of intense pain in the jaw. You may never have the first chest pain during the course of a heart attack. Nausea and intense sweating are also common symptoms. Sixty percent of people who have a heart attack while they’re asleep do not wake up. Pain in the jaw can wake you from a sound sleep. Be careful, and be aware. The more we know, the better our chance to survive.
Bottom Line: There certainly is a medicinal value in eating fruit. But just as important as eating fruit, you need to know how and when to do so.
This article was inspired by an article written by Dr. Oz, http://www.threebrancheshealth.com/blog/dr.-oz-talks-about-eating-fruit-and-food-combining/

Want To Live To a 100? Here’s Some Advice

July 2, 2011

WORDS TO LIVE BY— Japan Times Author/Physician Shigeaki Hinohara At the age of 97 years and 4 months, Shigeaki Hinohara is one of the world’s longest-serving physicians and educators. Hinohara’s magic touch is legendary: Since 1941 he has been healing patients at St. Luke’s International Hospital in Tokyo and teaching at St. Luke’s College of Nursing. After World War II, he envisioned a world-class hospital and college springing from the ruins of Tokyo; thanks to his pioneering spirit and business savvy, the doctor turned these institutions into the nation’s top medical facility and nursing school. Today he serves as chairman of the board of trustees at both organizations. Always willing to try new things, he has published around 150 books since his 75th birthday, including “Living Long, Living Good” that has sold more than 1.2 million copies. As the founder of the New Elderly Movement, Hinohara encourages others to live a long and happy life, a quest in which no role model is better than the doctor himself. Energy comes from feeling good, not from eating well or sleeping a lot. We all remember how as children, when we were having fun, we often forgot to eat or sleep. I believe that we can keep that attitude as adults, too. It’s best not to tire the body with too many rules such as lunchtime and bedtime. All people who live long — regardless of nationality, race or gender — share one thing in common: None are overweight. For breakfast I drink coffee, a glass of milk and some orange juice with a tablespoon of olive oil in it. Olive oil is great for the arteries and keeps my skin healthy. Lunch is milk and a few cookies, or nothing when I am too busy to eat. I never get hungry because I focus on my work. Dinner is veggies, a bit of fish and rice, and, twice a week, 100 grams of lean meat. Always plan ahead. My schedule book is already full until 2014, with lectures and my usual hospital work. In 2016 I’ll have some fun, though: I plan to attend the Tokyo Olympics! There is no need to ever retire, but if one must, it should be a lot later than 65. The current retirement age was set at 65 half a century ago, when the average life-expectancy in Japan was 68 years and only 125 Japanese were over 100 years old. Today, Japanese women live to be around 86 and men 80, and we have 36,000 centenarians in our country. In 20 years we will have about 50,000 people over the age of 100. Share what you know. I give 150 lectures a year, some for 100 elementary school children, others for 4,500 business people. I usually speak for 60 to 90 minutes, standing, to stay strong. When a doctor recommends you take a test or have some surgery, ask whether the doctor would suggest that his or her spouse or children go through such a procedure. Contrary to popular belief, doctors can’t cure everyone. So why cause unnecessary pain with surgery? I think music and animal therapy can help more than most doctors imagine. To stay healthy, always take the stairs and carry your own stuff. I take two stairs at a time, to get my muscles moving.

Bottom Line: We are living longer.  Dr. Shigeaki Hinohara is providing advice on how live with a admirable quality of life as well as achieve longevity.  Who would have thought that it all begins with climbing stairs instead of taking the elevator?

 

An Apple A Day Does More Thank Keep the Doctor Away-It Just Might Make You Live Longer…Especially If You Are a Fruit Fly!*

March 29, 2011

Scientists are reporting the first evidence that consumption of a healthful antioxidant substance in apples extends the average lifespan of test animals, and does so by 10 percent. The new results, obtained with fruit flies – stand-ins for humans in hundreds of research projects each year – bolster similar findings on apple antioxidants in other animal tests. The study appears in ACS’s Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Zhen-Yu Chen and colleagues note that damaging substances generated in the body, termed free radicals, cause undesirable changes believed to be involved in the aging process and some diseases. Substances known as antioxidants can combat this damage. Fruits and vegetables in the diet, especially brightly colored foods like tomatoes, broccoli, blueberries, and apples are excellent sources of antioxidants. A previous study with other test animals hinted that an apple antioxidant could extend average lifespan. In the current report, the researchers studied whether different apple antioxidants, known as polyphenols, could do the same thing in fruit flies.  (This is particularly good news for fruit flies. If I were a fruit fly I would want to live longer too.)

The researchers found that apple polyphenols not only prolonged the average lifespan of fruit flies but helped preserve their ability to walk, climb and move about. In addition, apple polyphenols reversed the levels of various biochemical substances found in older fruit flies and used as markers for age-related deterioration and approaching death. Chen and colleagues note that the results support those from other studies, including one in which women who often ate apples had a 13-22 percent decrease in the risk of heart disease, and polish the apple’s popular culture image as a healthy food.

*J Agric Food Chem. 2011 Mar 9;59(5):2097-106. Epub 2011 Feb 14.
Apple Polyphenols Extend the Mean Lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster.

Eat Your Veggies-It Just May Prevent Cancer

January 31, 2011

Cruciferous vegetables contain compounds that preferentially destroy ineffective mutant p53 tumor suppressor proteins, but leave the good ones alone. Steve Mirsky reports in the Scientific American.

Generations of American children have been told, “Eat your broccoli!” And for decades, researchers have known that broccoli and related vegetables like cauliflower and watercress appeared to lower the risk of some cancers. And that compounds in the vegetables could kill cancer cells. But how the cruciferous veggies worked their medical magic was a mystery. Until now. Because researchers have figured out just what broccoli does that helps keep cancer in check. The work appears in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. [Xiantao Wang et al., “Selective Depletion of Mutant p53 by Cancer Chemoprevention Isothiocyanates and Their Structure-Activity Relationships“]

Proteins coded by the gene p53 help keep cancer from starting to grow. But when the p53 gene is mutated, the protection is gone. Mutated p53 is implicated in about half of all human cancers.

Broccoli and its relatives are rich in compounds called isothiocyanates, or ITCs. And these ITCs apparently destroy the products of the mutant p53 gene, but leave the healthy p53 proteins alone and free to suppress tumor development.

The researchers write that “depletion of mutant p53 may reduce drug resistance and lead to new strategies for treating cancer in the clinic.” In the meantime, eat your broccoli!

 

Nutrition for Your Prostate Gland

May 26, 2010

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in American men causing nearly 250,000 new cases each year. It is the second most common cause of death in American men, killing nearly 40,000 men annually. However, with regular examination consisting of a digital rectal exam and a PSA blood test, prostate cancer can be detected early and treated. There are other healthy life-style changes that can be easily done that may even help prevent prostate cancer.

  1. Start taking vitamin D, E and selenium supplements. Although further research is needed to confirm their effectiveness, studies have demonstrated that all three, vitamin D, E and selenium, show promise with regard to prostate cancer prevention when taken regularly.
  2. Eat more soybeans (or soybean products) and other legumes. Elevated levels of testosterone may increase your risk for developing prostate cancer. The phytoestrogens-nonsteroidal plant compounds that act like estrogen in the body and thus can help to regulate imbalanced hormone levels-contained in these foods may help to prevent prostate cancer; genistein, an isoflavone also found in soy foods, helps to normalize hormone levels and thus may reduce prostate cancer.
  3. Drink green tea. Antioxidant compounds in green tea may help prevent prostate cancer; some have even been found to kill prostate cancer cells in test tubes, while others have blocked enzymes that promote prostate cancer.
  4. Get plenty of fiber. Fiber can eliminate excess testosterone in the body; thus, a high-fiber diet can aid in the regulation of your body’s hormone levels and may help reduce the risk for prostate cancer.
  5. Reduce your intake of meat and saturated fats. Follow a low-fat diet: diets high in saturated fat ­animal fat in particular-and red met have been found to increase the risk for prostate cancer. Eating a low-tat diet also helps to prevent obesity, a condition that may also increase prostate cancer risk.
  6. Eat more broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, brussel sprouts and greens. A recent study found that men who ate cruciferous vegetables more than once a week were 40% less likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer than men who rarely ate them.
  7. Eat cooked tomatoes. Lycopene, the carotenoid pigment that makes tomatoes bright red, possesses powerful antioxidant properties and has been linked in some studies to a decreased risk for prostate cancer.
  8. Limit your dairy consumption. Diets high in dairy products and calcium may be associated with small increases in prostate cancer risk. Moderate your dairy consumption, and don’t overdo calcium­ supplements or foods fortified with extra calcium.
  9. Get regular aerobic exercise. Regular aerobic exercise has been associated with reduced risk levels for prostate cancer: exercise also helps prevent obesity and other health-related complications that obesity causes.
  10. See your physician for prostate cancer screenings regularly. While regular screenings can’t reduce your risk for prostate cancer, changes in diet and exercise can. They help ensure early diagnosis so that prostate cancer can be treated as effectively as possible. My best advice is to get screened annually if you are over the age of 50, if you have a family member who has prostate cancer, or if you are an African-American man.

Bottom Line: Prostate cancer may have a relationship with diet.  I cannot tell you for certain if you follow these instructions you will not develop prostate cancer.  But as my wonderful Jewish mother would say, “It may not help, but it voidn’t hoit!”