Posts Tagged ‘orchitis’

When There’s a Problem In the Jewel Sack-Scrotal Pain

September 1, 2012

Every man has taken one in the jewel box that bends him over in excruciating pain and discomfort. Fortunately, most of the pain goes away in a few minutes. However, the scrotum and its contents are very vulnerable to injury and disease. This blog will describe the most common conditions affecting men “down there”.

The scrotum is located outside the rest of the body in order to keep the testicles a few degrees cooler than the rest of the body. This is intended to keep the testicles which contain the sperm factories just the right temperature for sperm production.

Normal Anatomy of the Scrotum

The testicles have two functions: 1) sperm production and 2) testosterone production. Testosterone is the male hormone responsible for developing male characteristics like a deep voice, a beard, and the all-important sex drive.

Evaluation of the painful scrotum
Your doctor will take a careful history and find out how long the pain or swelling has been present. The doctor will want to know if the pain is associated with trauma like a soccer ball or someone’s foot to the “vital parts.” The association of pain and swelling with a fever is a sign of infection and inflammation. A physical exam will be conducted and a light may be used to see if there is excess fluid in the scrotum. This is followed by a urine exam and an ultrasound of the scrotum. This makes use of high frequency sound waves that are sent from a transducer and then reflected back to the transducer to be processed by a computer and then projected onto a computer screen. This test will usually diagnose most of the conditions that cause pain and swelling the scrotum.

Torsion

torsion of the testicle

This occurs when the testicle twists and inside the scrotum and cuts off the blood supply to the testicle. Although torsion of the testicle can occur at any age, it is most common in young boys and young men between the ages of 12 and 18. The chief compliant is the sudden onset severe pain in one testicle. It usually begins after exercise but can occur when the boy is at rest or even awaken the boy from sleep. The physical exam reveals that the testicle is painful to touch and drawn up high in the scrotum. The diagnosis is confirmed by the ultrasound exam. Immediate surgery is required in order to save the testicle. If surgical treatment is delayed beyond 4 hours, it is less likely that the testicle can be saved. Although torsion only occurs in one testicle, the urologist will always repair the opposite testicle so that torsion cannot occur on the opposite side in the future.

Testicular cancer

Testis Tumor


Most men with scrotal swelling worry about testicular cancer, it is actually relatively uncommon with only 7000 new cases diagnosed each year. The disease usually affects young men between the ages of 15-40. The cause is not known but it is much more common in males who have a testicle that has not descended into the scrotum at the time of birth. The man with testicular cancer usually notices a hard lump on the scrotum. The lump is usually painless. The diagnosis is confirmed with a blood test looking for tumor markers, beta HCG and alpha feto-protein, and a scrotal ultrasound. The treatment is to remove the testicle and the cancer. Testicular cancer has a very high cure rate. All men should learn to do a testicle self exam at least once a month. Any suspicious lumps or bumps should be brought to the attention of a physician.

Orchitis

Orchitis is an inflammation of the testicle that is associated with pain and fever and swelling. Mumps is the most common cause. It is not very common thanks to the use of vaccination in young boys. Mumps orchitis is caused by a virus and there is no treatment except bed rest, anti-inflammatory medication, and pain medication.

Epididymitis

This is a inflammatory condition involving the gland and ducts that are behind the testicle and are responsible for allowing sperm to mature until they are ready to enter the semen. It is usually a bacterial infection that starts in the urine or the prostate and then backs up and goes down the vas to cause an infection in the epididymis. The problem may be accompanied by burning on urination and a urethral discharge. Men may also have a fever.

The diagnosis is made with a physical examination, a urine test which may show evidence of infection. The treatment is bed rest, a scrotal support or tight jockey underwear to support the scrotum, antibiotics and anti-inflammatory medication.

Hydrococele

hydrococele


A hydrococele is a swelling that takes place slowly over time. Usually months or even years. A hydrococele is a collection of fluid around the testicle, which remains entirely normal. A doctor can easily make the diagnosis by simply transilluminating the scrotum with a bright flashlight held up against the scrotum. The diagnosis can be confirmed with an ultrasound examination.

The treatment is usually surgical procedure which is brief operation, done on a one day stay basis and most men can return to all activities two weeks after the operation.

Spermatococele

Spermatococeles are fluid filled cysts in the epididymis. Spermatococeles are usually painless swellings that can also be diagnosed by tranillunination. Surgery is the treatment of choice if the spermatococele causes discomfort because of its size or if it is cosmetically unacceptable.

Varicocele

varicocele


Varicoceles consist of dilated network of veins in the spermatic cord. This problem is common and occurs in 15% of men and occurs most commonly on the left side. It usually causes minimal discomfort but can be associated with infertility. Treatment consists of surgically tying off the abnormal veins or using a coil placed by a radiologist to occlude the abnormal veins.

Bottom Line: A lump or bump down there should get a man’s attention. Most scrotal conditions can be easily diagnosed in the doctor’s office or with a scrotal ultrasound. Most cases are not serious and prompt treatment will nearly always put a man back in action.

Orchitis-A Royal Pain In the Nutt

June 13, 2012

Orchitis is a painful inflammation of the testicle usually caused by a bacterial or a viral infection.  The most common virus that causes orchitis is mumps. It most often occurs in boys after puberty. Orchitis usually develops 4 – 6 days after the mumps begins. Because of childhood vaccinations, mumps is now rare in the United States.

Orchitis may also occur along with infections of the prostate or epididymis, which is the gland behind the testicle that is responsible for sperm maturation.  Orchitis may be caused by sexually transmitted diseases (STD), such as gonorrhea or chlamydia. The rate of sexually transmitted orchitis or epididymitis is higher in men ages 19 – 35.

Risk factors for sexually transmitted orchitis include: High-risk sexual behaviors, multiple sexual partners, personal history of gonorrhea or another STD, having a sexual partner with a diagnosed STD or having a urinary tract infection. 

Risk factors for orchitis not due to an STD include: Being older than age 45, long-term use of a Foley catheter (a tube used to drain the urine from the bladder to the outside of the body), surgery of the urinary tract such as a prostate or bladder operation. 

Symptoms of orchitis

The symptoms of orchitis include: Blood in the semen, a clear or yellow discharge from penis, fever, groin pain, painful ejaculation, Pain with intercourse or ejaculation, pain with urination, scrotal swelling, tender, swollen groin area on affected side, tender, swollen, heavy feeling in the testicle, and testicle pain that is made worse by a bowel movement or straining.

Signs and tests

A physical examination may show: an enlarged or tender prostate gland, tender and enlarged lymph nodes in the groin (inguinal) area on the affected side, and usually a tender and enlarged testicle on the affected side.

Tests may include:  Complete blood count (CBC) which usually shows an elevated white blood cell count, a esticular ultrasound, tests to screen for STDs, and a urinalysis and a urine culture (clean catch).

Treatment

Treatments may include:  Antibiotics — if the infection is caused by bacteria (in the case of gonorrhea or chlamydia, sexual partners must also be treated), anti-inflammatory medications such as ibuprofen, pain medications, and bed rest with the scrotum elevated and ice packs applied to the affected area.

Expectations (prognosis)

Getting the right diagnosis and treatment for orchitis caused by bacteria can usually preserve the normal testicle function.

If the testicle does not completely return to normal after treatment, further testing to rule out testicular cancer should be done.  Usually this can be done with the scrotal ultrasound. 

Mumps orchitis cannot be treated, and the outcome can vary. Men who have had mumps orchitis can become sterile if the condition affects both testicles.

Complications

Some boys who get orchitis caused by mumps will have shrinking of the testicles (testicular atrophy).  Orchitis may also cause infertility.  Other potential complications include:  Chronic epididymitis, death of testicle tissue (testicular infarction) and scrotal abscess.

Acute pain in the scrotum or testicles can be caused by twisting of the testicular blood vessels (torsion), which is a surgical emergency. If you have sudden pain in the scrotum or testicles, get immediate medical attention.

Calling your health care provider

All testicle abnormalities should be medically evaluated. Call your physician or go to the nearest emergency room if you experience sudden pain in the testicle.

Prevention

Getting vaccinated against mumps will prevent mumps-associated orchitis. Safer sex behaviors, such as having only one partner at a time (monogamy) and condom use, will decrease the chance of developing orchitis as a result of a sexually transmitted disease.

Bottom Line: Orchitis is usually caused by an infection and prompt treatment is required in order to save the testicle.  Call your physician or go to the emergency room for evaluation and treatment.