Posts Tagged ‘prostate’

Don’t Beat the Band to Treat the Enlarged Prostrate Gland

October 21, 2016

The prostate is just a walnut sized gland that forms a part of the male reproductive system. The gland is constructed of two lobes, or areas, surrounded by an outer layer of tissue. For reasons not entirely understood, the prostate gland becomes enlarged, causes problems with urination, and affects a man’s quality of life.  That may be the bad news.  The good news is that there are ways to treat it.

 

The prostate can be found in front of the rectum and just beneath the urinary bladder, where urine is stored. The prostate also encompasses the urethra, the duct by which urine passes out from the body. For most men, the nightly bathroom runs can be the very first indication of an enlarged prostate. Other symptoms might include problem beginning a flow of urine, leaking or dribbling.

 

During the early stage of prostate enlargement, the urinary bladder muscle becomes thicker and forces pee through the narrow urethra by contracting more strongly. Like grey hair, an enlarged prostate is just a natural byproduct of getting older, doctors say.

Although it is just not known why only some males develop an enlarged prostate, it is clear that increasing age is the primary risk factor. The problem is, the nightly bathroom runs can be frequent, finally edging their way into the day routine. I recommend seeing your doctor if you develop urinary difficulties because of an enlarged prostate.

 

Benign prostatic hypertrophy is a non-cancerous enhancement of the prostate gland, often found in men over the age of fifty. Problem in passing urine or pain when passing urine, a burning or stinging feeling when passing urine, strong, regular urge to pass urine, even when there is just a small amount of urine are the signs of benign prostatic hypertrophy.

 

Treatment for an enlarged prostate is dependent upon the symptoms and signs and their severity. In case you have significant problems, like urinary bleeding, persistent bladder infections, urinary bladder and kidney harm, your physician will likely recommend treatment.

 

In case your prostate is enlarged, but your symptoms are not too bothersome, treatment might not be necessary. This is referred to as watchful waiting.  If you and your doctor select this option, you will be asked to return about once a year for a symptom check, a prostate exam and a PSA test or prostate specific antigen test which is a screen test for prostate cancer in men between the ages of 50 and 75.

 

There are two kinds of medication that help to control the signs of an enlarged prostate, they are alpha blockers and alpha reductase Inhibitors.

The alpha blockers work by calming the muscles at the neck of the urinary bladder making urination easier. Alpha reductase inhibitors work be actually shrinking the size of the prostate gland.  An enlarged prostate now is just easier to treat if the treatment begins early. These medications have side effects including reducing the volume of the ejaculate at the time of sexual intimacy.  The alpha blockers also affect the ability to have cataract surgery which is very common in older men.  Finally, the drugs must be taken for the rest of man’s life.

 

Now there are minimally invasive treatments such as lasers, prostatic urethral implants or UroLift to open the prostate to allow an improved flow of urine from the bladder to the outside of your body, and the use of steam or water vapor to heat the prostate tissue to reduce its size and affect urine flow.

 

Finally, there are surgical procedures to remove the prostate tissue.  The most common is the transurethral resection of the prostate or TURP.  These operations require admission to the hospital, a general anesthesia so the patient doesn’t experience any pain, the use of a catheter for a few days, and several weeks or moths to return to normal activity.

 

Your doctor will explain the different treatments and which might be best for your situation.

 

Complications of the Large Prostate Gland

October 21, 2016

 

The most common condition affecting millions of middle age American men is benign enlargement of the prostate gland.  This is called benign prostatic hyperplasia or BPH, which is a non-cancerous enlargement of the prostate. For reasons not entirely known, the prostate increases in size around age 50.  As the prostate gland grows, the gland compresses the urethra, which is the tube that transports urine from the bladder to the outside of the body.

Over time, the growth causes the urethra to become so compressed that it becomes difficult for men to empty the bladder.   The symptoms associated with enlarged prostate gland include frequency of urination, urgency of urination, dribbling after urination and even the complete inability to urinate or allowing only a small amount of urine to exit the bladder.

Bladder stones are formed when crystals inside the bladder collect together and harden to form a stone.  They often occur when the bladder is not fully emptying, so the urine that is left behind remains in the bladder for long time and coalesce and form stones.

Symptoms of bladder stones include frequent urination throughout the day, lower abdominal pain, a burning sensation when urinating, urine that appears cloudy or contains blood, and urgency of urination.

Urinary retention is the inability to fully empty your bladder. Acute urinary retention is a medical emergency, so it does require immediate medical attention.

There are two main types of urinary retention.  If there is an obstruction such as a bladder or kidney stone, then urine cannot properly be released, resulting in urine remaining in the bladder after urination. In this case, urinary retention can be life threatening, and you will require immediate medical intervention and the insertion of a catheter to relieve the blockage.

The most common cause of acute urinary retention is the enlarged prostate which compresses the urethra or the tube from the bladder that transports urine from the bladder to the outside of the body.

Non-obstructive urinary retention is caused by the weakening of the bladder muscles or nerve problems disrupting the communication between the bladder and the brain. Causes of non-obstructive urinary retention include stroke, pelvic injury or trauma, nerve diseases, impaired muscle or nerve function, and spinal cord injury that affects the nerves to the bladder.

Chronic urinary retention mainly affects men as a result of prostate enlargement. Although the condition is not life threatening, it can lead to permanent kidney damage. In chronic urinary retention, a man is unable to fully void their bladder, so urine stays within the bladder, increasing the risk of urinary tract infections.

Symptoms of chronic urinary retention include urinary frequency, urgency and hesitancy, nighttime urination, symptoms similar to a urinary tract infection, and lethargy and emotional irritability.

Urinary tract infections are often associated with urinary retention. Symptoms include cloudy or foul-smelling urine, blood in urine, difficulty urinating, pain while urinating, nausea, vomiting, shaking and chills, and fever.

Hematuria, or blood in urine, is frequently a benign condition, but there may be a risk of a more serious condition, too. For men with documented blood in the urine which is confirmed by a urine examination, you will will need some additional testing such as urine culture, a radiologic examination of the kidneys, and a cystoscopy or a look in the bladder with a lighted tube.

As the bladder retains urine, it continues to stretch. Excess stretching weakens the bladder muscles, making it impossible for the bladder to contract.  If this is left untreated, then permanent damage to the bladder muscle will occur and even if the obstruction is relieved the bladder muscle cannot contract and the man may be left with a permanent urinary catheter or may have to catherize himself several times a day.

Bottom Line: Every man over age 50 should see his doctor every year to check his prostate and to obtain a PSA blood test which is a screening test for prostate cancer.  Nearly every man can be treated with either medications or minimally invasive procedures that can often be done in the doctor’s office.

Preventive Health For All Men

January 18, 2016

Do you know that most men spend more time taking care of their cars or planning a vacation than they do taking care of their health?  In the U.S., women live 5-7 years longer than men.  I believe one of the reasons is that women seek out regular medical care throughout their entire lives.  They see a obstetrician during child bearing years; they get regular mammograms; they obtain routine PAP smears and other preventive health measures for their entire lives.  Men, on the other hand, stop seeing a doctor around age 18 and never see the inside of a medical office until middle age.  During that time they can have high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol levels, diabetes, and prostate diseases.

But there are some things men, in particular, should keep in mind when it comes to maintaining their health:

Heart disease and cholesterol

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 200,000 people die each year from preventable heart disease and strokes, with men being significantly more at risk than women.

Men should begin screenings for these issues in their mid-30s.

Annual health examinations should begin at around age 50.  This should include a test for anemia, a cholesterol level, a chest x-ray if the man is a smoker, a PSA test for prostate cancer, and a blood pressure determination.

For those men with an elevated cholesterol level, they can lower the level by adhereing to  a healthy diet consisting less heavy in red meats and carbohydrates, and limiting alcohol consumption, i.e., 2 drinks\day. Men of all ages should also continue to stay physically active by incorporating aerobic activities, i.e., any activity that increases the heart rate for 20 minutes 3-4 times a week, into their lifestyle, as well as strength training.

Prostate health

There is some debate among health care professionals about when men should begin screening for prostate cancer. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and the CDC recommend against screening unless men begin experiencing the symptoms associated with prostate cancer. These include frequent urination, especially at night, pain during urination and difficulty fully emptying the bladder.

Prostate screening can begin earlier in life, around age 40, if there is a high risk for prostate cancer, such as family history, or bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms.

Testosterone

As men age, lowering testosterone levels can become another area men should monitor.  Significantly low testosterone levels can predispose a man to low bone mineral density with subsequent bone fractures, erectile dysfunction (impotence) and low energy levels.

Testing for testosterone levels is done through a blood test.

Bottom Line: these are the minimal preventive care that all men should consider around age 30-40.  Remember if it ain’t broke don’t fix it, may apply to your car, but not to your body.  You need to take preventive measures with your body just as you do with your automobile.

Options for Treating The Enlarged Prostate Gland

November 16, 2015

For reasons not entirely known, the prostate gland starts to increase in size around age 50 and causes symptoms of difficulty with urination. The prostate gland is a walnut sized organ at the base of the bladder and surrounds the tube, the urethra, which transports urine from the bladder to the outside of the body. When the prostate gland grows, it compresses the urethra making urination difficult.

By the time men are in their 40s or 50s, many are already experiencing symptoms, such as having to get up at night to urinate. Into their 60s and 70s, they may have to get up two or three times.

In addition, an enlarged prostate can also result in other urinary symptoms such as having to go frequently during the day, having a weak stream or having to go urgently.

The “gold standard” is called a transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), where an instrument is inserted up the urethra to remove prostate tissue that is blocking urine flow. It is sometimes colloquially referred to as a “roto-rooter” procedure. The purpose of the TURP to carve out the inner portion of the prostate and leave just the shell. The procedure allows a much stronger stream and men who have it will have to urinate much less frequently.

However, the procedure requires general anesthesia and a hospital stay. While it does not usually interfere with the ability to have an erection, more than half of those who have it will experience “retrograde ejaculation,” meaning that no fluid comes out of the penis during orgasm. Instead, the fluid goes into the bladder where it is eliminated during urination. Men will also have to wear a catheter for a few days after the procedure and will require several months before they can resume all activities including sexual intimacy and heavy lifting.

Similar procedures known as GreenLight Laser Treatment, which uses a high-energy laser to vaporize prostate tissue, and holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP), which also uses a laser to destroy prostate tissue, are also available. They are pretty much the same in terms of outcomes. They just use different energy sources.

Now there is a new treatment, the UroLift, that doesn’t remove any tissue but relieves the compression on the prostate gland making urnation easier and reducing the symptoms. The procedure can be done in the office setting, does not require any catheter, and does not cause any sexual side effects or retrograde ejaculation.

Bottom Line: Many middle aged men have sympotms related to the enlarged prostate gland. There are multiple treatment options and men can plan to resume their activities after treatment for benign prostate disease.

If you are 50 or older and you have any of these symptoms and they are bothersome, talk to your doctor.

 

 

 

 

Benign Enlargement of the Prostate Gland Affects Millions of U.S. Men-New Treatment With Prostate Urethral Lift

November 11, 2015

Benign enlargement of the prostate gland affects nearly millions American men. In the past the procedure of choice was a surgical procedure, transurethral resection of the prostate gland, which is often referrd to as the rotor router procedure. Now a first line treatment is the prostate urethral lift PUL, is a new alternative. This blog will discuss the PUL, how it works, and what are the risks and complications of the procedure.

Lack of awareness about a common health condition may be causing millions of men to suffer unnecessarily. Benign prostate enlargement (BPE), affects more than 37 million men in the United States alone. Unfortunately, many men postpone treatment for this disorder because of concerns about side effects such as problems with ejacualtion and impotence or erectile dysfunctihowever, their concerns may be alleviated with additional information.BPE occurs when the prostate gland that surrounds the male urethra becomes enlarged with advancing age and begins to obstruct the urinary system. Symptoms include sleepless nights and urinary problems, and can cause loss of productivity, depression and decreased quality of life.

About one in four men experience BPH-related symptoms by age 55 and, by age 70, over 80 percent of men suffer from BPH. Most men blame their symptoms on aging. They may not be aware of the high prevalence of BPH or the available medical or surgical treatment options. There is a high risk to delaying treatment and so men should proactively talk with their doctors.

The prostatic urethral lift is a minimally invasive procedures the risks are low compared to medications or other surgeries. BPE can have a significant impact on quality of life for men as well as their partners, and can place limitations on their activities. For example, the need for frequent urination may make travel, sleep and sports activities difficult. We hope that with greater awareness of symptoms and treatment options, men will take a more active role in treating BPE, and live life with greater vitality.

A recent U.S. survey of more than 1,000 men over the age of 50 demonstrated that concerns about the risk of side effects, such as loss of sexual function or urinary incontinence, would cause a majority to postpone or avoid treatment of BPH.

This is unfortunate because, not only is early treatment important to alleviate symptoms and stop the
disorder from worsening, but a new minimally invasive treatment option is available that does not require cutting, heating or removal of prostate tissue, and as such does not result in loss of sexual function or urinary incontinence.

The survey results mirror other research and anecdotal evidence from patients that show that men
rarely mention their BPE-like symptoms.

The more recent survey, which was completed in October 2015, demonstrated that:
• A majority of men (61 percent) would postpone treatment for BPH because of the risk of sexual
• side effects or urinary incontinence from traditional treatments
• Eighty-four percent of respondents indicated they would be more open to seeking treatment for
• BPE if the treatment options available held less of a risk of impotence or incontinence
• Nearly half of the men surveyed (44 percent) were not aware that BPH is more common than
• prostate cancer. In fact, BPE impacts more than 12 times as many men in the U.S. as prostate cancer
• Concerns over surgical treatments was high among respondents, with 83 percent stating they
• were interested in a treatment option that could improve BPE symptoms without cutting, heating or
• removing prostate tissue1

In the past,mMedication is often the first-line therapy for enlarged prostate, but relief can be inadequate and temporary. Side effects of medication treatment can include sexual dysfunction, dizziness and headaches, prompting many patients to quit using the drugs. For these patients, the classic alternative is surgery that cuts or ablates prostate tissue to open the blocked urethra. While current surgical options can be very effective in relieving symptoms, they can also leave patients with permanent side effects such as urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction and retrograde ejaculation (dry orgasm).

About NeoTract
The PUL is a minimally invasive and clinically effective device that address unmet needs for men with BPE. The PUL is a minimally invasive permanent implant system that treats symptoms while preserving normal sexual function.

The UroLift System consists of a delivery device and tiny permanent implants. FDA cleared in 2013, this
unique technology works by directly opening the urethra with tiny implants that hold the enlarged tissue out of the way, like tiebacks on a window curtain. No cutting, heating, or ablating tissue is involved, making the UroLift System the first and only BPE treatment that does not remove prostate tissue and does not negatively impact a man’s sexual function.

4 pins in the prostate open the gland and allow improvement in urinary symptoms

4 pins in the prostate open the gland and allow improvement in urinary symptoms

I have done over 40 cases using the PUL and none of the men have experienced any sexual side effects from
the procedure. Most men can have the procedure in the office setting. They can leave the office without
a catheter and have marked improvement immediately or in a few days. The side effects are frequency of
urination and small amount of bleeding which only last for a short period of time. Research has demonstrated
that the procedure lasts for at least three years.

Most insurance companies, including Medicare, pay for the PUL procedure.

If you would like to more about the PUL, go to my website, http://www.neilbaum.com, or go to YouTube and use the following URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cEJsJ3E0pJI

Bottom Line: BPE is a common condition affects millions of American men. A first line treatment that is effect is the prostate urethral lift. Give my office a call if you have
any questions.

Put Pumpkin On Your Holiday Table-Your Prostate Will Thank You

October 25, 2015
From The Daryl and Luellen Berger Halloween Display

From The Daryl and Luellen Berger Halloween Display

It’s holiday season and time to carve a pumpkin for Halloween and have pumpkin pie for Christmas.  If the only thing you have ever done with pumpkin is carve it and fill it with a candle, you are not alone. Many people tend to think of pumpkins as little more than just a holiday decoration or a pie filling, but you may want to rethink this plump orange plant.  It has wonderful medicinal value that you might want to know before carving that pumpkin and discarding the seeds the pulp from this veritable medicine chest of good nutrition.

Pumpkin is an extremely nutrient dense food, meaning it is chock-full of vitamins and minerals but low on calories. There are many creative ways pumpkin can be incorporated into your diet, including desserts, soups, salads, preserves and even as a substitute for butter. Next time pumpkin season comes around, don’t carve it, cook it up and eat it!

Consuming one cup of cooked, canned pumpkin would provide well over 100% of your daily needs for vitamin A, 20% of the daily value for vitamin C, 10% or more for vitamin E, riboflavin, potassium, copper and manganese at least 5% for thiamin, B-6, folate, pantothenic acid, niacin, iron, magnesium, and phosphorus.

Of course, using fresh pumpkin and preparing it yourself will give you the most health benefits, so steer clear of canned pumpkin pie mix, as canned pumpkin has added sugars, syrups, etc. For the best nutritional value pumpkin should have only one ingredient: pumpkin.

Consuming fruits and vegetables of all kinds has long been associated with a reduced risk of many lifestyle-related health conditions. Many studies have suggested that increasing consumption of plant foods like pumpkin decreases the risk of obesity and overall mortality, diabetes, heart disease and promotes a healthy complexion and hair, increased energy, overall lower weight.

Pumpkin is one of the best-known sources of beta-carotene, a powerful antioxidant known to give orange vegetables and fruits their vibrant color and which is converted to vitamin A in the body. Consuming foods rich in beta-carotene may reduce the risk of developing certain types of cancer, offer protection against asthma and heart disease, and delay aging and body degeneration.

Blood pressure: Eating pumpkin is good for the heart! The fiber, potassium and vitamin C content in pumpkin all support heart health. Consuming adequate potassium is almost as important as decreasing sodium intake for treatment of hypertension (high-blood pressure). Other foods that are high in potassium include cantaloupe, pineapple, tomatoes, oranges, spinach and bananas.

Increased potassium intakes are also associated with a reduced risk of stroke, protection against loss of muscle mass, preservation of bone mineral density and reduction in the formation of kidney stones.

Cancer: One particular type of cancer where research has shown a positive benefits of a diet rich in beta-carotene is prostate cancer, according to a study conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health’s Department of Nutrition.5 Beta-carotene has also been shown to have an inverse association with the development of colon cancer in the Japanese population.

Eye Health: The antioxidants vitamin C, vitamin E and beta-carotene (all of which pumpkin has) have been shown to support eye health and prevent degenerative damage.

A higher intake of all fruits (3 or more servings per day) has also been shown to decrease the risk of and progression of age-related macular degeneration.

Fertility: For women of child-bearing age, consuming more iron from plant sources such as spinach, beans, pumpkin, tomatoes, and beets appear to promote fertility, according Harvard Medical School’s Harvard Health Publications. The vitamin A in pumpkin (consumed as beta-carotene then converted to vitamin A in the body) is also essential during pregnancy and lactation for hormone synthesis.

Immunity: Plant foods like pumpkins that are high in both vitamin C and beta-carotene offer an immunity boost from their powerful combination of nutrients.

A nice sedative:  Why does everyone take a nap after a heavy Thanksgiving meal?  It is the tryptophan in the pumpkin which raises melatonin and induces sleep.

Bottom Line:  Pumpkin is good for you and good for your prostate, too.  Enjoy the holiday.

Fido Finds Cancer-Dogs Used To Sniff Out Prostate Cancer

April 13, 2015

We have many high tech methods to detect cancer. We have blood tests, X-rays, CT scans, MRIs just to name a few. Now there’s a low tech means to detect prostate cancer using dogs. An Italian study showed a 93% reliability rate for detecting bladder and prostate cancer.

The latest research, by the Department of Urology at the Humanitas Clinical and Research Centre in Milan, involved two German shepherds sniffing the urine of 900 men – 360 with prostate cancer and 540 without.
Scientists found that dogs were accurate in 98.7% of cases.

They said the dogs are able to detect prostate cancer specific volatile organic compounds in the urine but said an important question remains of how a dog would find it in daily practice.

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the US, with more than 250,000 new cases diagnosed every year.

Dogs can pick up a scent in a dilution of one to a thousand parts. There is no single test for prostate cancer, but the most commonly used are blood tests, a physical examination or a biopsy.

The research has been published in the Journal Of Urology, one of America’s most prestigious urologic publications.

Bottom Line: Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men and there are a myriad of tests to make the diagnosis. Perhaps in the near future we will be asking fido to help us out!

New Treatment For The Enlarged Prostate Gland-The UroLift

March 13, 2015

NEW ORLEANS – It’s a condition that men may not want to talk about, but it affects their sleep, their intimate relationships, and work.

But now there’s a new, simple fix for a common prostate condition.

Doug Depp is one of the millions of baby boomer men with a common health problem, Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia, called BPH.
“I was getting up 4, 5 times a night easy and feeling the discomforts of it. I couldn’t empty my bladder. I lost a lot of confidence in being able to go places, be comfortable,” said Depp, 68.

After the age of 50, the prostate gland, for some reason, grows. When it does, it squeezes down the size of the tube that urine flows through. It affects a man’s quality of life. But now there is a new procedure called UroLift System. It involves no cutting or heating away tissue in an O.R.

“I think this is a game changer, and the reason being is that often times men who have an enlarged prostate, are treated with medications. These medications affect their sex life,” explained Dr. Neil Baum, a urologist at Touro.

The UroLift has a pin on one side and a clip on the other. In less than an hour in the office or outpatient surgery, Dr. Baum inserts a few of the devices through the urethra. They permanently hold both sides of the enlarged prostate away from putting pressure on the urethra. Men can either be under mild IV sedation or a local anesthesia.

“This procedure, the UroLift, preserves sexual performance. The men have no problem with ejaculation. It doesn’t affect their erections and the beauty is when they have the procedure, they go out without a catheter most of the time, and they are able to urinate with improved stream immediately,” Dr. Baum explained.

Depp says there was not a lot of discomfort and a few days later he was 100 percent normal again.

“I used to always think of a place to go, you know, McDonald’s or some place you know, on the way, and you have to pick and choose but now it’s a lot more freedom not to worry about it,” laughs Depp.

The UroLift is FDA approved and most insurance companies pay for the procedure.

Testosterone Replacement Therapy (TRT) After Prostate Cancer Diagnosis

March 7, 2014

For nearly 50 years the medical profession has had the opinion that men with prostate cancer or at risk for prostate cancer should avoid testosterone as it was like adding gasoline to a fire. Well, that assumption has been reversed and there are certain men with prostate cancer who have symptoms of low testosterone, such as lethargy, falling asleep after meals, loss of muscle mass, and decreased libido, and who have documented low blood testosterone levels.
Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) might be suitable for men with hypogonadism who also have a history of prostate cancer, but more research is needed, according to a group of Canadian and American scientists.

Typically, TRT is not considered for this population because exogenous testosterone is believed to stimulate the growth of prostate cancer cells. However, recent research has suggested that TRT might be safe for these men. Still, these studies have been small and the safety of TRT is still questioned.
This study took another look at this issue. Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data, the researchers examined the prostate cancer-specific outcomes, disease-specific survival, and overall survival information for 149,354 men with prostate cancer. The men’s median age was 73 years. Less than one percent of the men (1,181) underwent TRT after their cancer diagnosis.

Testosterone was administered via injections or subcutaneous pellets. Men on TRT underwent a median of 8 years of follow up; for men who did not take testosterone, the follow-up median was 6 years. TRT was more common among men who had had radical prostatectomy and those who had well-differentiated tumors. TRT was less common among men on watchful waiting or active surveillance protocols.

Overall and cancer-specific mortality rates were higher among men who were not on TRT. Also, TRT was not associated with higher rates of salvage androgen deprivation therapy.
The researchers noted the following:
• TRT did not appear to raise the rates of overall or cancer-specific mortality. In fact, the men taking testosterone had fewer mortality events than those who were not on TRT. The researchers were not certain why this occurred and noted the need for more follow-up.
• The percentage of men using TRT was low and declined over time. In 1992, 1.24% of the men underwent TRT after prostate cancer diagnosis. By 2006, that rate fell to 0.40%. In contrast, the researchers pointed out that the prevalence of hypogonadism, for which TRT is often prescribed, is much higher, ranging from 2.1% to 25%, depending on the parameters used.
• Income and educational status were factors in TRT use. “Seemingly, educated young men of means are more likely to either seek out, be offered, or accept TRT than other men,” wrote the study authors.
They added, “As the effects of hypogonadism intensify with age, and as our understanding of hypogonadism and testosterone deficiency expands, improved access to testosterone replacement will be important for older, low-socioeconomic (SES) men with prostate cancer, should further studies corroborate TRT safety.”
In light of these results, the researchers concluded that TRT could be safe for men after prostate cancer diagnosis. However, they stressed the need for prospective studies to confirm their findings.

The study was published online in January in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

Bottom Line: There are times when it is necessary to challenge old ideas and assumptions. This certainly applies to testosterone replacement therapy and men with prostate cancer. If a man has a stable PSA after treatment for localized prostate cancer, has symptoms of low testosterone, and a documented decrease in the blood testosterone levels, then hormone replacement therapy may be helpful.

Resources
The Journal of Sexual Medicine
Kaplan, Alan L., MD
“Testosterone Replacement Therapy Following the Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer: Outcomes and Utilization Trends”
(Full-text. First published online: January 21, 2014)
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jsm.12429/full

Vasectomy and Other Medical Issues-Prostate and Testicular Cancer

November 14, 2013

There isn’t a day that goes by that men ask me about the consequences of having a vasectomy.
These reports were prompted by concerns that vasectomy, which involves surgery to cut the tubes that carry sperm, could lead to inflammation in the pelvic region. Prolonged inflammation in certain circumstances can increase cancer risk.

There has been some uncertainty surrounding this question, but recent studies have demonstrated that having a vasectomy has NO effect on the risk of prostate or testicular cancer.
Older data – from studies tracking disease rates across broad population groups – suggested a modest connection, while other studies found no such link.

More recent studies from researchers at institutions such as Boston University and the University of Washington showed no convincing association between vasectomy and prostate cancer. The Boston University group and researchers in Denmark found no link between vasectomy and testicular cancer.

Bottom Line: Today, we can say with confidence that vasectomy does not increase or decrease the likelihood of developing prostate or testicular cancer.