Posts Tagged ‘sex drive’

February 13, 2017

HCG And Testosterone: Double Bang For Your Sex Drive Buck

If you find that your sex drive is in the tank, you have difficulty with erections, that Viagra, Levitra, and Cialis which once worked, are no longer effective, then you may be suffering from low T or low testosterone.  The diagnosis is easily made from a blood test.

If you are like most men, you will find that your manhood and confidence level comes from the area between your belly button and your knees, i.e., your “package”.  It is there in the testicles which are are responsible for making testosterone, the male hormone associated with so many functions including sexual activity, energy level, muscle mass, and even your mood.

Not only does testosterone control so many of these functions, so does hCG or human chorionic gonadotropin.  hCG stimulates the gland at the base of the brain, the pituitary gland to produce more LH or luteinizing hormone (LH) to encourage the testicles to release more testosterone. hCG can be injected and administered to stimulate the right dose of healthy testosterone production.

The benefits of hCG for men include boosting healthy levels of testosterone that’s needed for every biological process to ensure optimal health. Correcting low testosterone levels by using hCG for men can bring on many benefits for men which include:

  • Increase red blood cells
  • Support the cardiovascular system
  • Increases flow of blood and oxygen
  • Healthy body hair growth
  • Weight loss, reduction of fat mass
  • Increased energy levels, endurance, and performance
  • Increase in lean muscle mass and muscle strength
  • Reduced risks of obesity
  • Improved oxidation in the groin area
  • Increase in libido
  • Improved penile growth due to oxidation
  • Proper stimulation to continue boosted sexual desire
  • Proper stimulation to improve endurance and sexual performance
  • Reduced risks of erectile or other sexual dysfunctions
  • Increase in bone density
  • Reduced risks of arthritis-related conditions

 Although hCG is both safe and effective for females and males to use, there are possible side effects that you should be aware of. These include:

  • light-headedness
  • nausea
  • headaches
  • mild fatigue
  • irritation at injection site

More serious side effects are rare and are normally associated with incorrect use of hCG but can include:

  • Swelling of breast tissue in males
  • Depression, irritability and other mood changes
  • Swelling of feet or ankles
  • Early onset of puberty in young boys

Bottom Line: It is crucial to discuss treatment with your doctor to determine if the benefits of using hCG therapy outweigh the possible side effects you may experience and to ensure correct dosing and application of the hCG.

Testosterone, Depression, and SSRI’s or Anti-Depressants-What’s the Connection?

December 21, 2015

Many people that take antidepressants, specifically SSRI’s (selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitors), find out that they have abnormally low testosterone. So what does this all mean? Did the initial low testosterone lead the individual to become depressed and go on an antidepressant? Or did the treatment with an antidepressant actually slowly reduce the individual’s natural ability to produce testosterone?

It really is a “chicken vs. egg” type argument in regards to whether low T caused depression or an antidepressant caused low T. Unfortunately there is no clear-cut scientific answer as to whether the antidepressant you took caused your testosterone to be lowered.

With that said, new research comes out all the time finding new things about antidepressants (SSRI’s) – they really aren’t well understood. Many antidepressants medications are now linked to development of diabetes, birth defects, etc. Although there are no formal studies to link antidepressants with low testosterone, many people taking these drugs are convinced that they are the root cause.

It could have been that the lower testosterone was what caused the person to feel depressed in the first place. The low T could have also merely been a coincidence among those who are depressed – after all, having low T is a pretty common issue.

Antidepressants and Testosterone: Many people taking antidepressants experience low testosterone. Similarly, many people with low testosterone are taking antidepressants. These two factors could also occur independently. In other words a person may develop low testosterone while on an antidepressant without the antidepressant being the cause. 



Depression and Testosterone: Many people may be experiencing depression as a result of low testosterone. Similarly many people may be experiencing low testosterone as a result of depression. Additionally, these two factors could be totally unrelated and independent of each other. In other words the depression could have nothing to do with low T and vice versa.
Depression and sex drive – Many people with depression tend to have lower than average sex drives. It is the depression that is thought to lead to disinterest in pleasurable activities like sex. People may be in such a depressed, low level of arousal, that they don’t feel like having sex. Therefore in this case, it could be that the depression and not testosterone is causing reduced sexual interest.
Testosterone and sex drive – It is well known that healthy testosterone levels are linked with a healthy sex drive. Men that have low T tend to have less fuel for sex, erectile dysfunction, and other performance issues. If your testosterone level were to be lowered, the natural result would be a reduced sex drive. This reduced sex drive could be linked to depression – therefore testosterone could play a role.
Low testosterone causing depression? – Individuals with lower than average levels of testosterone could be experiencing depressive symptoms as a result of their low T. Studies have found that among men with abnormally low levels of T, testosterone therapy helped reduce symptoms of depression. For this reason it is important to rule out all causes of depression (including low T) before you get on an antidepressant.
Antidepressants and low testosterone – It is well documented that antidepressants can affect hormones. Therefore some hypothesize that hormonal changes can influence our sex drive. It is not known whether antidepressants are the culprit behind lowering levels of testosterone. Many people that have taken SSRI’s believe that the drugs they took lowered their testosterone.
Bottom Line: There is no question that there is a relationship between testosterone and depression. I cannot say for certain that low testosterone is a result of the use of SSRIs. However, if you are taking SSRIs and you are experience a low sex drive or libido, it is very easy to ask your doctor to obtain a blood testosterone test. If it is low, treatment is easily accomplished with either testosterone injections, topical gels or pellets.

Ladies, Is Testosterone The Answer To The Low Libido Question?

September 13, 2015

Almost everyone knows that testosterone is the man’s hormone and is responsible for his sex drive or libido. But few know that testosterone is also the hormone for women’s sex drive and libido. This blog will discuss the role of testosterone in women and what you can do if your sex drive is in the tank.

If you are a menopausal woman, chances are pretty good that your sex drive has slowed down since your “roaring twenties and thirties”.

Some of you will go so far as to say that you have no interest in sex whatsoever. There is a really good physiological reason for this decrease in interest, by the way. When women hit their forties and beyond, the ovaries start their journey toward menopause. That means that we are getting closer to the end of our ovarian production of both estrogen and testosterone. These hormones play a critical role in women’s sexual health and wellness. The decline in testosterone is a normal part of aging, but it can have a profound physical and emotional impact on some women.

Women make plenty of testosterone from their ovaries, starting at puberty and lasting a few until menopause or until the ovaries stop producing estrogen and testosterone. Testosterone has several duties, including improving our sense of well-being and energy, maintaining bone health and, of course, assisting estrogen in the pursuit of sexual health and normal functioning.

Testosterone therapy is approved by the FDA in menopausal women who have the diagnosis of hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD).

Bottom Line: Women with low sex drive might want to speak to their doctors and have their testosterone level checked. If the testosterone is low and the women complains of a decrease in her sex drive, then testosterone replacement in women is an option.

The Link Between Low T (Testosterone) and Depression

August 17, 2015

Most men think of testosterone as the sex hormone responsible for libido or sex drive. Yes, that is true but there is a also link between low testosterone levels and depression.

A study released at this year’s meeting of the Endocrine Society bring important news that men should know: Depression can go along with borderline or low testosterone levels.

A solid 56 percent of testosterone-deficient participants in the study, from the division of endocrinology at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., had significant symptoms or a diagnosis of depression and/or were taking an antidepressant.

The study involved men with testosterone levels of between 200 and 350 nanograms per deciliter. (A level below 300 ng/dL is considered low.)

Although I don’t recommend screening for low testosterone levels, I do suggest that men who are feeling depressed or not as happy as they would like to feel, consider getting their T levels checked.  It’s something your doctor could have missed that is very important to be addressed.

 Discussions about sex and erections

In general, doctors say men don’t like to discuss symptoms of low testosterone – such as erectile dysfunction and reduced sex drive – and that can make getting to the root cause of the condition and treating it harder.

There are symptoms of low testosterone that are specific to low testosterone – like a blood level less than 300 ng/dL, erectile dysfunction, low sperm count, large breasts and osteoporosis – and symptoms that are not, such as weight gain, decreased muscle strength and mood changes. Depression falls into the non-specific category.

If a person is treated for low testosterone and their mood improves, it could be said in hindsight that low testosterone probably caused their depression, but it’s hard to make a definite correlation at the onset.

Testosterone naturally starts to drop after age 30 at a rate of about 1%\year.

Testosterone replacement therapy, which can be given in the form an injection, a patch, a topical gel or a pellet inserted beneath the skin which lasts for 4-6 months.

Low T and Other Medical Problems

There is a correlation between low testosterone and a variety of indicators of poor health – obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, a lack of exercise as well as depression.

There is a well known connection between low T and obesity.  Obesity is the No. 1 cause of low testosterone levels and if you lose 10 to 15 percent of your total weight, your testosterone level will come up. In patients who have a testosterone level of less than 200 ng/dL and in younger patients who have a disease or a cancerous tumor that is causing low testosterone, medication is the obvious choice and usually yields improvement.

Paying attention to decreased testosterone is important because low testosterone raises a man’s risk of death and its decline is markedly accelerated by each co-morbidity.

Non Medical Ways to Boost Testosterone Levels

November 9, 2014

Testosterone is the male hormone produced in the testicles and it is responsible for man’s sex drive. Low testosterone levels can impact a man’s sexual performance. This blog will discuss life-style changes that men can make to improve their testosterone levels.

The sex hormone testosterone is often touted as helping men maintain their vitality and virility, but levels begin to dip naturally by about 1 percent a year after age 30. Signs that your testosterone may be declining more rapidly include loss of energy, decreased sex drive, irritation or anger, and trouble sleeping.
Although testosterone supplementation is effective, there are risks and side effects that make life style changes a more attractive alternative. There are many tried and true drug-free and hormone-free ways to maintain testosterone levels.

Deep Six the Sauce (Alcohol)
A glass of wine with dinner is no problem, but overdrinking is not a good idea. Moderate alcohol consumption for men is a max of two drinks a day, with one being a 5-ounce glass of wine.

Shed Some Pounds
Being overweight or obese can increase risk for heart disease and certain cancers, but extra weight also increase the risk for low testosterone levels. Research published in Diabetes Care in June 2010 showed that 40 percent of obese men had lower-than-normal testosterone readings, and this percentage increased to 50 percent among obese men with diabetes. Weight loss can be a hormone-free way to combat low T. A benefit of weight loss for obese men is that the penis will appear to be longer because of the loss of the abdominal fat. I usually tell men that every 30 pound weight loss increases the length of the penis by 1.5 inches.

Send Out a Stress SOS
A study done at the University of Texas at Austin in 2010 suggested that the stress hormone cortisol may block the beneficial testosterone. When our stress levels are up, our testosterone can go down.

Regular exercise helps reduce stress levels as well as help you maintain a normal weight, so it packs a double whammy against low testosterone levels. Other stress reduction techniques, like deep breathing, can also serve as natural testosterone support.

Take a Big Dose of Vitamin “E”-Exercise
Exercise can help maintain your testosterone levels and avoid some of the symptoms of low T.
Research in the September 2011 issue of the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research backs this up. The study showed that a 4-week sprint-interval training program helped boost testosterone levels in a drug-free fashion among wrestlers.

Sleep And Sex
A small study conducted at the University of Chicago School of Medicine found that men who slept less than five hours a night for one week had lower levels of testosterone than when they had a full night’s sleep.
When you are sleep deprived, it impacts levels of the stress hormone cortisol, which reduces testosterone just like stress can. A sleep-deprived state is a testosterone-deprived state. Everyone’s sleep needs are different, but it’s important that you wake up feeling refreshed.

Avoid Plastic Bottles
The controversial chemical bisphenol A (BPA) is found in many plastic water bottles as well as in the lining of food and beverage cans, and exposure to this plasticizer may result in low T. BPA can act like the female hormone estrogen in the body, which means it can lower levels of testosterone,
Don’t cook foods wrapped in plastic in the microwave, and try to drink from a glass or a steel thermos. The more flexible a plastic bottle, the more likely it is to leach BPA and affect the testosterone level

Think Zinc
If you take a multivitamin with zinc or eat oysters every day, your zinc levels are probably within the normal range. Aim for 12 to 15 milligrams a day to help stave off low T.

Some Fat Is Your Friend

Men who eat a low-fat diet have lower testosterone, because the body makes testosterone from cholesterol. But this doesn’t mean you should eat unhealthy bad fats. Instead choose healthy fats such as those found in avocado, nuts, and olive oil. These fats will boost testosterone naturally, but they won’t raise blood levels of artery-clogging cholesterol.

Skip the Sugar

Every time you eat sugar, testosterone is decreased, likely because the sugar causes a high insulin level which can decrease the testosterone level.
Bottom Line: Low testosterone levels are a treatable condition that affects millions of men. There are options that don’t require medication that also improve your overall health and wellness.

10 Reasons That Sex Contributes to Good Health

June 1, 2014

On so many occasions many of my male and female patients have indicated that as they reach middle age, that sexual intimacy has taken a back seat and is less important than it was years ago. For this blog, I would like to illuminate 10 reasons to take the sex drive off the back shelf and put it on the front burner. Both you and your partner will be glad you did.
Sex not only feels good. It can also be good for you. Here’s what a healthy sex life can do for you.
1. Revs Up Your Immune System Humming
Sexually active people miss fewer days of work and make fewer visits to the doctor.
People who have sex have higher levels of what defends your body against germs, viruses, and other foreign substances. Researchers found that those men and women who had sex once or twice a week had higher levels of the a certain antibody compared to those who had sex less often.
You should still do all the other things that make your immune system happy, such as:
Eat right.
Stay active.
Get enough sleep.
Keep up with your vaccinations.
Use a condom if you don’t know you and your partner’s STD status.
2. Boosts Your Libido
Having sex will make sex better and will improve your libido.
For women, having sex increases vaginal lubrication, blood flow to the pelvis, and elasticity of the vagina, all of which make sex feel better and help you crave more of it.
3. Improves Women’s Bladder Control
A strong pelvic floor is important for avoiding incontinence, involuntary loss of urine, something that will affect about 30% of women at some point in their lives.
Good sex is like a workout for your pelvic floor muscles. When you have an orgasm, it causes contractions in those muscles, which strengthens them.
4. Lowers Your Blood Pressure
Research suggests a link between sex and lower blood pressure. Numerous studies have reported that sexual intercourse lowered systolic blood pressure, the first or top number on your blood pressure test.
5. Counts as Exercise
Sex is a really great form of aerobic exercise. It won’t replace the treadmill, but it counts for a short cardio workout.
Sex uses about five calories per minute, four more calories than watching TV! It bumps up your heart rate.
So get busy! You may even want to clear your schedule to make time for it on a regular basis. Consistency or regular sex helps maximize the benefits.
6. Lowers Heart Attack Risk
A good sex life is good for your heart. Besides being a great way to raise your heart rate and provide you with a cardio workout more fun than spinning, sex helps keep your estrogen levels in women and testosterone levels in men in balance.
When either one of those is low you begin to get lots of problems, like osteoporosis and even heart disease.
Having sex more often may help. During one study, men who had sex at least twice a week were half as likely to die of heart disease than the less sexually active men who had sex rarely.
7. Lessens Pain
Before you reach for an aspirin, ibuprofen or a pain pill, try an orgasm.
An orgasm can block pain by releasing endorphins which are much more powerful than morphine. Orgasm releases endorphins that helps raise your pain threshold.
Stimulation without orgasm can also be effective. Vaginal stimulation can block chronic back and leg pain, and many women report that genital self-stimulation can reduce menstrual cramps, arthritic pain, and in some cases even headache.
8. Send Big “C” Out To Sea
Going for the sexual homerun or orgasm may help ward off prostate cancer.
The prestigious the Journal of the American Medical Association reported that men who ejaculated frequently (at least 21 times a month) were less likely to get prostate cancer.
You don’t need a partner to reap this benefit: Sexual intercourse, nocturnal emission, and masturbation were all part of the equation.
9. Improves Sleep
You may nod off more quickly after sex, and for good reason.
After orgasm, the hormone prolactin is released, which is responsible for the feelings of relaxation and sleepiness after sex.
10. Eases Stress
Being close to your partner can soothe stress and anxiety.
Even touching and hugging can release your body’s natural feel-good hormones. Sexual arousal releases a brain chemical that revs up your brain’s pleasure and reward system.
Sex and intimacy can boost your self-esteem and happiness, too,
Bottom Line: Who would have “thunk” that sex is good for you and can help keep you healthy and well. As my wise Jewish mother, St. Sara, would say, “It may not help but it voidn’t hoit!” Rest in peace St. Sara.

Sex Drive In the Tank? Then Filler Up With DHEA

January 22, 2014

Nearly every doctor and every patient believes that their sex drive or libido comes from their testosterone level and that restoring testosterone with injections, gels, or pellets will restore a man’s virility. The answer is yes and no. Yes, testosterone is responsible for a man’s sex drive but so is the ratio of testosterone to estrogen. A testosterone/estrogen imbalance can severely inhibit sexual desire and sexual performance.

In a man’s youth, low amounts of estrogen are used to shut down the powerful cell stimulating effects of testosterone. As estrogen levels increase with age, testosterone cell stimulation may be locked in the “off” position, thus turning off sexual arousal and sensation and resulting in a loss of libido in aging men.

Another concern is that aging men sometimes convert testosterone to estrogen. The increase in estrogen is taken up by testosterone receptor sites in the cells and prevents circulating testosterone from gaining access to the cells where it can do its greatest function.

Testosterone is responsible for the sex drive in both men and women. In order for testosterone to do its job, it must be in the free form and not bound to other circulating proteins like sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). SHBG increases with age and grabs the free testosterone making it unavailable to the cells where it is needed to initiate sex-stimulating centers in the brain. Also excess estrogen increases the production of SHBG and blocks the testosterone-receptor sites. These are the two mechanisms that impact a man’s libido associated with aging.
Therefore, it is necessary to suppress excess levels of SHBG and estrogen while increasing free testosterone to the level of a younger more youthful man. By restoring the normal ratio of testosterone to estrogen ratio a man’s libido and sexual performance often improves.

One of the easiest ways to accomplish this restoration of the normal T\E ratio is to prevent testosterone from being converted into excess estrogen. Too much estrogen plays havoc with a man’s sex life by binding to testosterone receptor sites and also the associated increase in SHBG, which decreases the freely available testosterone.
Certainly estrogen is a necessary hormone for men just as testosterone is necessary hormone for women.

The problem of an abnormal ratio of T\E can easily be diagnosed with a simple blood test for estradiol. Levels that are greater than 30pg/ml are abnormal and would benefit from treatment that lowers the estrogen level and the SHBG levels.

Treatment of elevated estradiol in men can be accomplished with a prescription medication, Armidex, which is aromatase inhibitor and blocks the conversion of testosterone to estrogen. The dosage is 50mg\day. Studies have demonstrated that this dosage decreases the estrogen level in approximately one month.

Bottom Line: Testosterone deficiency is a common problem affecting many middle age and older men. Often this is due to an imbalance of testosterone\estrogen ratio. This can be easily treated with oral aromatase inhibitors. So if you are middle age and your doctor prescribed testosterone and it isn’t working, I suggest you speak to him or her about getting an estradiol level and if it is elevated, then treatment with an aromatase inhibitor.

Dr. Neil Baum is a physician practicing at Touro Infirmary and can be reached at his office, 504 891-8454, or via his website, http://www.neilbaum.com

Libido In The Tank? There’s Help For Women’s Sex Drive

April 9, 2013

As both men and women join the mid-life club they have a waning of their sex drive. The desire for sex decreases with advancing age. For men the problem is a decrease in testosterone and for women it is a result of a decrease in estrogen as well as a decrease in testosterone. Well, now help is available and a man or woman’s libido can be restored. This blog will discuss the treatment options available for women who have a decrease in their libido.

Causes of decreased libido in women

A woman’s sex drive is connected to both psychological issues as well as physical problems. Women who are in a stable relationship and take good care of themselves physically are likely to have fewer problems than those who are not in a good relationship.

The physical issues, including hormonal changes related to menopause or childbirth, or thyroid problems. Also, chronic stress can significantly impact a woman’s sex drive. Certainly depression or other mental health issues will have a a negative impact on a woman’s sex drive. Finally, some prescription drugs may also affect libido, including some types of antidepressants, birth control pills (especially those containing progesterone), anti-anxiety drugs, and blood pressure medications all can have a deleterious effect on a woman’s libido. Also women who have pain during sex may develop low sexual desire It is not uncommon for a woman to have more than one cause of a decrease in her libido.

Reviving Your Libido

The easiest solution is to speak to your physician and be sure that your medications are not the culprit. The doctor can adjust the dosage of your medication or prescribe another class of drugs that doesn’t affect the libido or sex drive. If there is a relationship problem, the doctor may recommend a referral to a sex counselor or sex therapist. I suggest that you look for a gynecologist or a sex therapist who is knowledgeable about the physical, relationship-related, and emotional components of sexual dysfunction.

Now there are medications that can have a favorable impact on a women’s sex drive. Estrogen vaginal creams, which can help if vaginal dryness makes sex painful. This typically happens when estrogen levels fall due to menopause or breastfeeding. Estrogen also comes in other forms, such as a tablet or skin patch. Testosterone and other androgens decline as women age. These hormones may play a role in sexual function in women just like they do in men. In women with low libido just before, during, or after menopause, or in women who’ve had surgery to remove their ovaries, some experts suggest the use of testosterone treatment. Testosterone can be given to women as a pill such as Estratest, a topical gel applied to the skin, or a pellet that is placed under the skin and is replaced every 4-6 months. Wellbutrin, an antidepressant, may be prescribed to treat low sex drive in women who haven’t been through menopause or if other antidepressants have affected their sex drive.

What About Supplements?

Some supplements claim to boost women’s libido, but many lack scientific proof. Most of the these products are based on anecdotes and testimony. My advice: Be skeptical if there isn’t evidence from a clinical trial.

Bottom Line: Women do not have to say goodbye to an enjoyable sex life because of a decrease in libido. Help is available. See your doctor and have a discussion about the treatment options.

Sex Drive In The Tank? DHEA Is An Option

February 13, 2013

Women with a decreased sex drive or decreased libido now have treatments that can restore their interest and enthusiasm for sexual intimacy. Options include testosterone, yes the hormone produced in the testicles of men, but also produced in small amounts in women and is responsible for a women’s sex drive. Testosterone is available in pills, lozenges, patches, gels injections, and small rice-sized pellets inserted underneath the skin. Although there are advantages and disadvantages to each, most gynecologists and urologists will not prescribe pills, which can increase the risk of liver toxicity and lower levels of HDL (the “good” cholesterol).

A slightly “milder” alternative to testosterone is DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone). This steroid hormone is converted to testosterone. Supplementary DHEA, which is available in pill or cream form, increases testosterone levels by one-and-a-half to two times. So it’s not surprising that DHEA provides many of the same therapeutic benefits, including increased sexual interest and enhanced physical and mental satisfaction.

If you think you might be a candidate for testosterone therapy, here’s what to do:
Have your testosterone, DHEA and estrogen levels measured. Normal concentrations of testosterone range from between 25 and 100 nanograms per milliliter of blood.
Eat a well-balanced diet to stabilize your hormones Fiber and foods rich in minerals, such as potassium and magnesium can help balance hormones. Tofu, tempeh and other soy products are excellent sources of phytoestrogens, plant compounds that behave like mild estrogens in the body, helping relieve menopausal symptoms. Other sources of phytoestrogens include apples, alfalfa, cherries, potatoes, rice, wheat and yams. A diet rich in fruits and vegetables will also help maintain optimal health as you transition into menopause.
If you begin androgen therapy, be sure to report any side effects, such as acne, deepening of your voice, go to your doctor so he or she can monitor your progress and decrease your dosage as necessary.

Bottom Line: Although it is not for everyone, emerging research may reveal androgen to be one of the most promising therapies available to menopausal women. Sexuality and vitality need not be passing pleasures of youth.

This was modified from “Testosterone: A Major Breakthrough for Menopausal Women”. This article appeared in Fit & Health and can be accessed at: http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/women/menopause/testosterone-major-breakthrough-for-menopausal-women5.htm

Vasectomy-The Big Snip Does Not Affect Your Sex Drive

October 21, 2011

It’s a natural concern, for both husband and wife. Couples often want to know, but sometimes don’t know how to ask the question. Will things be the same – especially for the man – following a vasectomy?

Does a vasectomy effect a male sex life? The straightforward answer to this question is a “No.” A vasectomy does not reduce a man’s sexual drive or his ability to have or enjoy sex. The procedure eliminates only the man’s ability to father a child… he can still experience an erection and ejaculation as before.

This is an excellent topic for a candid discussion between husband and wife, and perhaps with the doctor of their choice. Some couples are concerned about a reduced libido or sex drive, but they may be shy about asking the question.

What they may come to discover is, once sterility is complete, they no longer need to worry about accidental pregnancy – and that lovemaking can be more spontaneous, more sensuous and more enjoyable than before.

A vasectomy does not effect the blood vessels or nerves that are part of having an erection or ejaculation. Nothing physiologically changes in that respect.

Two important cautions!

It’s important to note that a man will not be sterile immediately following a vasectomy. Talk to your doctor, who will test your semen for sperm before you can have unprotected sex. It may take up to 20 ejaculations or more and several weeks before your reproductive system is free of active sperm.

Another caution is that a vasectomy is not a protection against sexually transmitted disease (STD). If you are at risk of transmitting or acquiring an STD, you and your partner will still need the protection of a condom or other means of protection.

So what’s the difference?

Typically, the only significant difference after a vasectomy is that the sperm normally produced is missing from the semen. The glands that produce semen are not changed by a vasectomy. Sperm is such a tiny portion of the total ejaculation fluid (about 2 percent) that the change can’t be noticed. Even the color and consistency of the ejaculate are not changed.

There’s no effect on “masculinity,” either. The man’s body continues to produce hormones as before, and there is no change in any of the male characteristics such as beard or voice. Testosterone continues to be produced and released into the bloodstream. Testicles continue to manufacture sperm, but they don’t leave the body. Unused sperm are simply absorbed by the body as normally occurs with or without a vasectomy.

In Summary:

Talk candidly with your spouse and your doctor.
A vasectomy will not decrease your sex drive.
The procedure only eliminates your ability to father a child.
Sterility is not immediate; your doctor will need to test you and advise.
Vasectomy is no protection against sexually transmitted disease (STD).
You can still have an erection and ejaculate.
The body continues to produce hormones.
Male characteristics (voice, beard) are not affected.

Read more: http://www.vasectomy.com/ArticleDetail.asp?siteid=V&ArticleId=5#ixzz1bRaLDYcv