Posts Tagged ‘supplements’

Non-Medical Solutions to Raising Your Low T Level

March 23, 2017

I am often asked by patients what can a man do to raise his testosterone level without taking testosterone replacement therapy?  Here are a few suggestions that may be helpful.

  1. Exercise and lift weights

If you want to increase your testosterone levels, you will need to increase your exercise frequency. Regular exercise will not only help you by preventing different lifestyle related health problems, but it will also help you by boosting your testosterone levels. Men who regularly exercise have a higher testosterone levels. Even elderly men will also have higher testosterone levels if they regularly exercise.

  1. Reduce stress and cortisol levels

If you are suffering from long-term stress, it can increase the levels of cortisol hormone. If your cortisol levels are high, testosterone levels will decrease.

That’s why, you need to reduce stress as much as possible and which will also decrease the cortisol levels in your body. Regular exercise, whole foods, good sleep, balanced lifestyle and laughter can help you to reduce stress and also improve your overall health.

  1. Get more Vitamin D

Vitamin D offers several health benefits and it boosts testosterone naturally. If you consume just 3,000 IU of vitamin D3 per day, it can increase testosterone levels in the body by 25%.

You can get more vitamin D by increasing your exposure to sunlight regularly. You can also take a daily supplement of 3,000 IU of a vitamin D3 supplement.

4. Get Enough Sleep.

A lack of sleep affects a variety of hormones and chemicals in your body. This, in turn, can have a harmful impact on your testosterone.

The time honored goal is try for 7 to 8 hours per night.

5. Keep a Healthy Weight.

Obesity can have a deleterious effect on your testosterone levels.  Exercise and diet can improve your testosterone and also is good for your heart to avoid obesity.

6. Review Your Medications.

Some medicines can cause a drop in your testosterone level. These include: pain medications, steroids (prednisone), anabolic steroids such as those used by athletes and body builders, and anti-depressants.

7. Deep 6 the Supplements.

You may be bombarded with unsolicited snail mail and E –mail offering testosterone boosting supplements such as DHEA.  Let the truth be told, you are wasting your money as these supplements will not boost your testosterone.

Bottom Line:  Although these suggestions are helpful, they are just a step in the right direction.  For more information about testosterone replacement therapy, speak to your physician.

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January 21, 2017

Non-Medical Solutions to Raising Your T Level

I am often asked what can a man do to raise his testosterone level without taking testosterone replacement therapy.  Here are a few suggestions that may be helpful.

  1. Exercise and lift weights

If you want to increase your testosterone levels, you will need to increase your exercise frequency. Regular exercise will not only help you by preventing different lifestyle related health problems, but it will also help you by boosting your testosterone levels. Men who regularly exercise have a higher testosterone levels. Even elderly men will also have higher testosterone levels if they regularly exercise.

  1. Reduce stress and cortisol levels

If you are suffering from long-term stress, it can increase the levels of cortisol hormone. If your cortisol levels are high, testosterone levels will decrease.

That’s why, you need to reduce stress as much as possible and which will also decrease the cortisol levels in your body. Regular exercise, whole foods, good sleep, balanced lifestyle and laughter can help you to reduce stress and also improve your overall health.

  1. Get more Vitamin D

Vitamin D offers several health benefits and it boosts testosterone naturally. If you consume just 3,000 IU of vitamin D3 per day, it can increase testosterone levels in the body by 25%.

You can get more vitamin D by increasing your exposure to sunlight regularly. You can also take a daily supplement of 3,000 IU of a vitamin D3 supplement.

4. Get Enough Sleep.

A lack of sleep affects a variety of hormones and chemicals in your body. This, in turn, can have a harmful impact on your testosterone.

The time honored goal is try for 7 to 8 hours per night.

5. Keep a Healthy Weight.

Obesity can have a deleterious effect on your testosterone levels.  Exercise and diet can improve your testosterone and also is good for your heart to avoid obesity. 

6. Review Your Medications.

Some medicines can cause a drop in your testosterone level. These include: pain medications, steroids (prednisone), anabolic steroids such as those used by athletes and body builders, and anti-depressants. 

7. Deep 6 the Supplements.

You may be bombarded with unsolicited snail mail and E –mail offering testosterone boosting supplements such as DHEA.  Let the truth be told, you are wasting your money as these supplements will not boost your testosterone.   

Bottom Line: Although these suggestions may be helpful, they are just a step in the right direction.  For more information about testosterone replacement therapy, speak to your physician.

 

 

Supplements and Testicular Cancer-Is There a Relationship?

May 4, 2015

Testicle cancer is the most common cancer in men between the age of 20-40. The cause of testicle cancer is not known but a recent report suggests a relationship between the use supplements and testicle cancer.
In the United States, 8,500 men are diagnosed with the disease every year. Exactly what causes testicular cancer remains largely a mystery to the scientific community, but a new study published recently in the British Journal of Cancer has uncovered an unexpectedly high correlation between muscle-building supplements and testicle cancer.

The study was conducted by interviewing 356 men who had been diagnosed with testicular germ cell cancer, and 513 men who had not. Researchers asked not only about their supplement use, but also about other factors such as smoking, drinking, exercise habits, family history of testicular cancer, and prior injury to the groin, in order to rule out confounding variables. Supplement use was defined as consuming one or more supplements—such as pills and powders containing creatine or androstenedione—at least once a week for four consecutive weeks or more.

After accounting for confounding influences, as well as age, race, and other demographics, researchers found that men who used supplements had a 65 percent greater risk of having developed testicular cancer than men who did not use supplements.

They also found evidence that application of supplements beyond the moderate definition of supplement use increased risk even further:
Men who used more than one kind of supplement had a 177 percent greater risk.
Men who used supplements for three years or longer had a 156 percent greater risk.
Men who started using supplements at age 25 or younger had a 121 percent greater risk.

Inspired by mounting evidence that at least some supplement ingredients may damage the testes, the study is the first of its kind to explore the possible link between supplements and testicular cancer. The authors hope that future studies and experiments will substantiate their findings.

Bottom Line: No one can say with any degree of certainty that supplements cause testicle cancer. However, until the study is confirmed, the question men everywhere should be asking themselves is, “are the gains worth it?”

ED (Erectile Dysfunction) – What About Natural Solutions? They May Be Dangerous To Your Health

March 11, 2015

ED (Erectile Dysfunction) – What About Natural Solutions?

ED is a common problem affecting over 30 million American men. For the past 10 years oral medication, Viagra, Cialis, and Levitra have been available for helping me achieve intimacy with their partners. A recent analysis by the FDA has revealed that some of the many over the counter (OTC) supplements contain the same active ingredient in Viagra but often at a higher more dangerous dose than what is prescribed by the doctor.

As reported by BuzzFeed, in the past week as many as 25 “natural supplements” meant to treat erectile dysfunction were found to contain sildenafil citrate, the same active ingredient found in prescription drugs such as Viagra.

Despite an obvious attempt at falsely advertising a prescription drug as an herbal remedy, the unregulated tainted supplements could cause serious harm and even death to those who unknowingly buy them.

Natural erectile dysfunction supplements are both one of the biggest sellers on the market for herbal treatments and one of the most likely to be tainted with unregulated ingredients. It’s suspected the FDA has only hit the tip of the iceberg regarding the current investigation into herbal erectile dysfunction.

The World Health Organization describes counterfeit drugs as a widespread problem, but it occurs most often in developing countries. For example, one study from 2012 found that around one-third of all available malaria medications sold in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa were counterfeit. A press release from the University of Michigan stated that counterfeit drugs kill around 700,000 people every year.

There is hope, though. Last year Pfizer made $1.7 billion off of Viagra sales. This large monetary stake that companies such as Pfizer have in prescription erectile dysfunction medication could be enough to push the regulation of fake drugs to priority level.

Bottom Line: There are effective drugs for treating ED. For the safety of your health and your erections, speak to your doctor or use only the medication prescribed by your physician.

Urinary Incontinence-Non-Medication Solutions

March 9, 2014

Millions of Americans suffer from incontinence. Americans are already “polymedicated” or taking far too many drugs. Many of my patients are trying to solve problems naturally without the use of medications. This blog will discuss the treatment of urinary incontinence without prescription medications.

Incontinence is a symptom of a urinary tract problem, and there are different types of urinary incontinence. Women commonly have overactive bladder\urge incontinence or stress incontinence with the loss of urine with coughing, sneezing, or with exercise.

Men most commonly experience stress incontinence — the accidental release of urine when the bladder is under pressure — after being treated for prostate cancer.
Another type of incontinence called overflow incontinence, occurs more commonly in men. This is associated with enlarged prostate — benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). BPH can squeeze the urethra and keep the bladder from completely emptying.

Whether you have stress incontinence, urge or overflow incontinence, there are natural steps you can take to support your urinary health and restore continence. If an enlarged prostate is causing your symptoms, you can learn how to promote a normal prostate size.

The lifestyle choices you make and the foods you eat can help you regain control of your bladder. Following are several lifestyle changes you can make that will positively affect your bladder control, prostate and urinary health.
Manage Fluids

Drink pure water. While it is important to stay properly hydrated, you want to avoid drinking in the two to three hours before bedtime.
Supplements

There are several natural supplements that support the urinary tract, and many supplements that shrink the prostate. Many men find urinary health benefits from quercetin, saw palmetto, curcumin, green tea extract, cranberry, stinging nettle and pygeum.

Fruits And Vegetables
These foods are high in antioxidants, vitamins, minerals and fiber. These support prostate health and urinary tract health, as well as being good for the rest of you too.

Consume Healthy Fats
Healthy fats such as omega-3 fatty acids and monounsaturated fats help promote prostate health.

Avoid Food Additives And Sugar
Some foods and additives are harmful to the prostate and your urinary function. Try to avoid the worst ingredients in processed foods.

Maintain A Healthy Weight
Being overweight can worsen symptoms of urinary incontinence by putting excess pressure on the bladder. Exercise helps promote prostate health.

Kegel Exercises
Doing Kegels every day can help improve bladder control. Other alternative treatments such as physical therapy may also be of help.

Avoid Cigarettes Or Drink
Smoking is a risk factor for stress incontinence. Alcohol increases urinary frequency, so try to limit or avoid it.

Drink Green Tea
Green tea health benefits come from its strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Whether your drink it or take it as a supplement, look for caffeine-free green tea.

Avoid Caffeine
Caffeine from coffee, tea and soda can promote urinary frequency. A study on incontinence in men and caffeine shows that men who consumed 234 mg or more of caffeine every day were 72 percent more likely to have some urinary incontinence compared to men who drink small amounts.

Avoid Foods That Irritate The Bladder
Foods and drinks that can irritate the bladder include citrus fruits, citrus juice, carbonated drinks and spicy foods.

Go When You Need to Go
Don’t hold your urine when you need to go. Holding it can irritate your urinary tract and possibly lead to a urinary tract infection.

Of course, there are medications and other treatments that can help with urinary symptoms of BPH, but they have some unwanted side effects. Before taking any medications, you should give some of the natural supplements and lifestyle changes a try. They may help and they won’t hurt.

Bottom Line: The first step is to talk to your doctor about what is causing your urinary incontinence and to develop a plan for dealing with the problem. Learn as much as you can about urinary incontinence. If you suffer from urinary incontinence, try some of these non-prescription alternatives. They just might work and will decrease your dependence on Depends!

This blog was inspired and modified by an article Treat Urinary Incontinence Naturally
Dr. Geo Espinosa
http://easyhealthoptions.com/easy-health-options-digest/treat-urinary-incontinence-naturally/

Nutritional supplements and cancer prevention-what’s the hype and what’s the science?

May 29, 2012

Millions of American men and women are taking nutritional supplements with the attention of preventing cancer and other serious health conditions.  Does this work and is it worth the risk?

The US food and drug administration categorized as nutritional supplements under the general a brown of foods rather than drugs.  The supplements had not undergone clinical trials and a rigorous approval process and cannot be removed from the market and less they are proven to be dangerous or have false labile information.  It is of interest that FDA Manufacturing guidelines do not have to prove supplements safe or affective.

The risks

A little is good but a lot can’t be harmful.  Most American study had on and off vitamins in their normal diet.  By taking extra vitamins can cause an overdose.  In 2008 a more than 69,000 cases of toxicity 228 vitamin overdose were reported.

Another risk of using supplements is that some supplements can interact with medications in a way that will harm the patient.  If you are taking prescription medications you should inform your physician about any nutritional supplements you may be using.

Nutrients in foods

It is true: An apple at they may really keep the doctor away.  Fruits and vegetables contain important nutrients and fiber, which helps protect against colon cancer.  By eating fresh fruits and vegetables you can reduce both the risk and recurrence of breast cancer.  The American institute for cancer research estimated that one third of the cancers that occur every year in the United States could be prevented by lifestyle changes, including bleeding or whole foods.

The reason whole foods are more beneficial than and vitamin supplements is probably that whole foods contain any nutrients that worked in combination to protect against cancers.  For example, fresh salmon is superior to salmon oil supplements because although both provide fatty acids, Fresh salmon provides nutrients not found in oil, such as vitamin D and B,amino acids, calcium and selenium.

Foods known to help prevent cancer include: berries, grapes, tomatoes, mushrooms, green tea, salmon, squash, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, linseed, and flaxseed.

Bottom line: For most people a diet that includes healthful foods can eliminate the needs for supplements.

Supplement Pills For Your Prostate-Probably Not Effective

March 6, 2012

Saw palmetto fruit extracts are widely used to treat lower urinary tract symptoms attributed to benign enlargement of the prostate gland. However, a new study shows that these extracts are no better than placebo at easing symptoms.
The findings were reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association (2011;306:1344-1351).
In the study, men were randomly assigned to receive a daily dose of saw palmetto extract, beginning 320 mg, or matching placebo. After 24 weeks, the saw palmetto dosage was increased to 640 mg per day. After another 24 week, it was increased to 960 mg per day, which is triple the standard dose. After 48 weeks there was no significant difference between placebo and saw palmetto supplements.
“Now we know that even very high doses of saw palmetto make absolutely no difference,” said study co-investigator Gerald Andriole, MD, Chief of Urologic Surgery at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Bottom Line: Saw palmetto is probably not effective in treating or preventing prostate gland enlargement.

Chicken Soup For The Soul and For the Cold-Natural Cold and Flu Remedies

February 26, 2012

It’s no wonder natural cold and flu remedies are popular — modern medicine has yet to offer a cure for these age-old ailments. While some antiviral drugs can prevent and shorten the flu’s duration, most medications only offer temporary relief of symptoms. Many natural remedies provide temporary relief as well, and a few may actually help you get better. This blog will discuss the most common natural remedies which are available at most health food stores and pharmacies.

Echinacea
Echinacea is an herbal supplement that is believed to boost the immune system to help fight infections. But it’s unclear whether this boost helps fight off colds or flu. Some researchers have reported no benefits, but at least one recent study paints a more positive picture. Patients who took echinacea shortened their colds by an average of 1.4 days. Still, some physicians remain skeptical, and it’s best to check with a doctor before trying this or other herbal remedies
Zinc
Some studies show that zinc appears to have antiviral properties. There is some evidence the mineral may prevent the formation of certain proteins that cold viruses use to reproduce themselves. While zinc does not appear to help prevent colds, some research suggests it may help shorten cold symptom duration and reduce the severity of the common cold when taken within 24 hours of the first symptoms. The FDA recommends against using zinc nasal products for colds because of reports of permanent loss of smell.

Vitamin C
The cold-fighting prowess of vitamin C remains uncertain. Some studies suggest it can help reduce the duration and severity of cold symptoms. In one study, participants who were exposed to extreme physical stress and cold weather — and who took vitamin C — were 50% less likely to get a cold. To prevent side effects, such as diarrhea and stomach upset, the maximum daily intake of vitamin C for adults is 2,000 milligrams.

Chicken Soup
Grandma was onto something. Chicken soup may help cold symptoms in more than one way. Inhaling the steam can ease nasal congestion. Sipping spoonfuls of fluid can help avoid dehydration. And some advocates say the soup may soothe inflammation. Researchers have found chicken soup has anti-inflammatory properties in the lab, though it’s unclear whether this effect translates to real-world colds. But as my wise Jewish mother would say, “It may not help, but it voidn’t hoit!”

Hot Tea
Drinking hot tea offers some of the same benefits as chicken soup. Inhaling the steam relieves congestion, while swallowing the fluid soothes the throat and keeps you hydrated. Black and green teas have the added bonus of being loaded with disease-fighting antioxidants, which may fight colds.

Hot Toddy
The hot toddy is an age-old nighttime cold remedy probably having its beginning during the time of the Civil War. Since you won’t want to drink black tea before bed, make a cup of hot herbal tea. Add a teaspoon of honey, a small shot of whiskey or bourbon, and a squeeze of lemon. This mixture may ease congestion, soothe the throat and help you sleep. Limit yourself to one hot toddy. Too much alcohol can affect the immune system.

Garlic
Garlic has long been touted for legendary germ-fighting abilities. And it is still being promoted as a health food with medicinal properties. Many of the claims surrounding it are not backed by enough research, yet garlic is very nutritious. In addition, it can help spice up your meals when a stuffy nose makes everything taste bland.

Steam/Humidifier
For a heavy dose of steam, use a room humidifier — or simply sit in the bathroom with the door shut and a hot shower running. Breathing in steam can break up congestion in the nasal passages, offering relief from a stuffy or runny nose.

Saline Drops
Dripping saltwater into the nose can thin out nasal secretions and help remove excess mucus, while reducing congestion. Try over-the-counter saline drops, or make your own by mixing 8 ounces of warm water with 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon baking soda. Use a bulb syringe to squirt the mixture into one nostril while holding the other one closed. Repeat 2-3 times and then do the other side.

Menthol Ointment
Days of wiping and blowing your nose can leave the skin around your nostrils sore and irritated. A simple remedy is to dab a menthol-infused ointment under, but not in, the nose. Menthol has mild numbing agents that can relieve the pain of raw skin. As an added benefit, breathing in the medicated vapors that contain menthol or camphor may help open clogged passages and relieve symptoms of congestion. Use only in children over 2 years of age.

Saltwater Gargle
For a sore throat, the traditional saltwater gargle may have some merit. Gargling warm water with a teaspoon of salt four times daily may help keep a scratchy throat moist.

Nasal Strips
Another strategy for relieving nighttime congestion is to try over-the-counter nasal strips. These are strips of tape worn on the bridge of the nose to open the nasal passages. While they can’t unclog the nose, they do increase the nasal openings and allow for improved airflow.

Let Your Fever Work
A fever is the original natural remedy. The rise in temperature actively fights colds and flu by making your body inhospitable for germs. Endure a moderate fever for a couple of days to get better faster. Just be sure to stay well hydrated. Call your doctor right away if the fever is over 104, unless it comes down quickly with treatment. In infants 3 months or younger call your doctor for any fever greater than 100.4. Children with a fever of less than 102 usually don’t require treatment unless they’re uncomfortable.

Bed Rest
With our busy lives, most of us loathe to spend a day or two under the covers. But getting plenty of rest lets your body direct more energy to fighting off germs. Staying warm is also important, so tuck yourself in and give your immune cells a leg up in their noble battle.

Bottom Line: Okay, these remedies aren’t guaranteed to solve all of your flu or cold symptoms. However, there may be weak scientific evidence that they do help reduce the symptoms of the flu or cold.

Nutrition for Your Prostate Gland

January 9, 2012

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in American men causing nearly 250,000 new cases each year. It is the second most common cause of death in American men, killing nearly 40,000 men annually. However, with regular examination consisting of a digital rectal exam and a PSA blood test, prostate cancer can be detected early and treated. There are other healthy life-style changes that can be easily done that may even help prevent prostate cancer.
1. Start taking vitamin D, E and selenium supplements. Although further research is needed to confirm their effectiveness, studies have demonstrated that all three, vitamin D, E and selenium, show promise with regard to prostate cancer prevention when taken regularly.
2. Eat more soybeans (or soybean products) and other legumes. Elevated levels of testosterone may increase your risk for developing prostate cancer. The phytoestrogens-nonsteroidal plant compounds that act like estrogen in the body and thus can help to regulate imbalanced hormone levels-contained in these foods may help to prevent prostate cancer; genistein, an isoflavone also found in soy foods, helps to normalize hormone levels and thus may reduce prostate cancer.
3. Drink green tea. Antioxidant compounds in green tea may help prevent prostate cancer; some have even been found to kill prostate cancer cells in test tubes, while others have blocked enzymes that promote prostate cancer.
4. Get plenty of fiber. Fiber can eliminate excess testosterone in the body; thus, a high-fiber diet can aid in the regulation of your body’s hormone levels and may help reduce the risk for prostate cancer.
5. Reduce your intake of meat and saturated fats. Follow a low-fat diet: diets high in saturated fat ¬animal fat in particular-and red met have been found to increase the risk for prostate cancer. Eating a low-tat diet also helps to prevent obesity, a condition that may also increase prostate cancer risk.
6. Eat more broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, brussel sprouts and greens. A recent study found that men who ate cruciferous vegetables more than once a week were 40% less likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer than men who rarely ate them.
7. Eat cooked tomatoes. Lycopene, the carotenoid pigment that makes tomatoes bright red, possesses powerful antioxidant properties and has been linked in some studies to a decreased risk for prostate cancer.
8. Limit your dairy consumption. Diets high in dairy products and calcium may be associated with small increases in prostate cancer risk. Moderate your dairy consumption, and don’t overdo calcium¬ supplements or foods fortified with extra calcium.
9. Get regular aerobic exercise. Regular aerobic exercise has been associated with reduced risk levels for prostate cancer: exercise also helps prevent obesity and other health-related complications that obesity causes.
10. See your physician for prostate cancer screenings regularly. While regular screenings can’t reduce your risk for prostate cancer, changes in diet and exercise can. They help ensure early diagnosis so that prostate cancer can be treated as effectively as possible. My best advice is to get screened annually if you are over the age of 50, if you have a family member who has prostate cancer, or if you are an African-American man.

Bottom Line: Prostate cancer may have a relationship with diet. I cannot tell you for certain if you follow these instructions you will not develop prostate cancer. But as my wonderful Jewish mother would say, “It may not help, but it voidn’t hoit!”

Vitamins May Not Be All That Helpful

December 28, 2011

It is not unusual to view an advertisement for a vitamin that suggests it helps people with cardiovascular problems, cancer, diabetes, or other chronic diseases. Judging the validity of these advertisements is often difficult due to what often appears to be conflicting data, and the use of personal anecdotes.
What is the evidence? A study was conducted by the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and published in 2006. (The complete report, Multivitamin/Mineral Supplements and Prevention of Chronic Disease can be viewed here)
The study examined the use of vitamins for the prevention of the following:
• breast cancer, colorectal cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, gastric cancer, or any other malignancy (including colorectal polyps)
• myocardial infarction, stroke
• type 2 diabetes mellitus
• Parkinson’s disease, cognitive decline, memory loss, dementia
• cataracts, macular degeneration, hearing loss
• osteoporosis, osteopenia, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis
• hepatitis, non-alcoholic fatty-liver disease
• chronic renal insufficiency, chronic nephrolithiasis
• HIV infection, hepatitis C, tuberculosis
• chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

The results of the study
The authors concluded there is limited evidence to date suggesting potential benefits of multivitamin/mineral supplements in the primary prevention of cancer in individuals with poor nutritional status or suboptimal antioxidant intake.
The evidence also indicates that multivitamin/mineral supplement use does not have significant effects in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and cataracts.
Regular supplementation of a single nutrient or a mixture of nutrients for years has no significant benefits in the primary prevention of cancer, cardiovascular disease, cataract, age-related macular degeneration or cognitive decline.
A few exceptions, that were reported in a single reviewed study included a decreased incidence of prostate cancer with use of synthetic α-tocopherol (50 mg per day) in smokers, a decreased progression of age-related macular degeneration with high doses of zinc alone or zinc in combination with antioxidants in persons at high risk for developing advanced stages of the disease, and a decreased incidence of cancer with use of selenium (200 mcg per day).
Supplementation with calcium has short-term (particularly within one year) benefit on retaining bone mineral density in postmenopausal women, and a possible effect in preventing vertebral fractures. Combined vitamin D3 (700–800 IU/day) and calcium (1000 mg/day) may reduce the risk of hip and other non-vertebral fractures in individuals with low levels of intake. Supplementation with β-carotene increased lung cancer risk in persons with asbestos exposure or cigarette smoking.
Users of Vitamins Beware
The overall quality and quantity of the literature on the safety of multivitamin/mineral supplements is limited. Among the adverse effects reported were vitamin A supplementation may moderately increase serum triglyceride levels. Calcium supplementation may increase the risk of kidney stones. Vitamin E supplementation was associated with an increased incidence of nosebleeds but was not associated with an increased risk of more serious bleeding events.

Bottom Line: Vitamins may be helpful for a few conditions. Nothing beats a good diet with fresh fruits and vegetables, plenty of exercise, and adequate sleep. Vitamins and supplements are not the cure all for many diseases or the major source of disease prevention.