Posts Tagged ‘wellness’

Sexual Wellness Program on Angela WWL, April 9, 2014

April 11, 2014

Angela Hill

Email: angela@wwl.com
Twitter: @AHillWWL

Angela: Help with sexual wellness is available, you just have to speak up!

by Angela Hill posted Apr 9 2014 4:22PM
Dr. Neil Baum has been a friend of “An Open Mind” ever since we started last fall, helping us understand medical issues that can affect our sex lives.

He spent a whole hour talking to WWL listeners today and pointed out that oftentimes, when it comes to sexual problems, women are suffering in silence, even though sexual dysfunction is more common in women than it is in men.

So what are the problems women are facing, and why can’t we speak out about it? It seems like every time you turn on the television or radio you hear an ad for a product that helps men with erectile dysfunction. Where is the help for women? Products to help women are just now starting to crack through, but haven’t gone mainstream yet.

So many men are having an open and honest dialogue with each other and their doctors, it is easy for them to speak out on these topics, but the lack of dialogue concercing female sexual dysfunction is holding women back. But it doesn’t have to be that way!

“Women who have problems with enjoyment, who have problems with dryness, who have problems with decreased libido are afraid to bring it up with their physicians. There are things that can be done for these women, and they should be encouraged to talk to their doctors,” Dr. Baum said. “Women have to understand that help is available for them, and they don’t have to suffer in silence.”

Is there Viagra for women?

“Right now, there is not. But there are things that can be done for decrease in drive for women, those whose interest is waning. It is primarily hormone-driven.”

Could hormone replacement therapy help your sex life? It’s not for everyone, but no matter what stage of life you are in, it’s imperative that you talk to your doctor, because there are options that can help you restore your love life.

One woman calls in to talk about her experience at “The Vagina Clinic,” where she found good medical advice from professionals tailored to her needs. Another man calls in with a question about testicular pain, and another with a question about fertility treatments

Everyone should take a moment to listen to the full interview – hear from men and women who have problems that may mirror those in your own life, or in the lives of your loved ones.

Bottom line? Talk to your Doctor!

FULL AUDIO: Angela talks to Dr. Neil Baum about sexual dysfunction and wellness

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Suffering From An Illness? Get a “Do It Yourself” Attitude

June 26, 2011

This post comes from an E-mail by Dr. Neil Niemark.  Anyone with that first name has to good writer!  🙂

True Health Means Making Every Day Precious
We all crave a greater sense of health and vitality in our lives. We all yearn for a deeper sense of inner peace and serenity. In order to achieve these noble goals, we must learn how to make every day precious.
How do we do this? By realizing that we are the architects of our own lives. Though it is so “natural” to want to blame other people or external events for our unhappiness, we are truly responsible for our own happiness.
What is the most powerful way to make every day precious? It is by developing a passionate involvement with life; participating fully in our own personal growth and development.

Vitality, serenity and inner peace do not come from living life on the sidelines, but rather from playing the game of life with all the gusto we have. We must engage life fully by moving towards our dreams and choosing the legacy we wish to leave.

We need to live life passionately, to live life as it’s unfolding, to live life on life’s terms. Not to shyly approach life, but to move into it. Living passionately does not mean living loudly or boisterously. It may be a quiet, peaceful way of being. But it is YOUR unique way of being, one that honors the fear and the suffering, but does not allow that fear or pain to immobilize us.

The Zen poet David Whyte speaks of passion beautifully, rendering images of fire, when he says: “We want the fire that warms, but we refuse the fire that burns.” We want a full and filling life (the fire that warms), but we refuse to expose ourselves to the risk and the suffering involved (the fire that burns) in etching out that life.

There have been engaging studies done on the healing power of participation. Dr. Charlene Kavanaugh, from the University of Wisconsin Medical School, compared a group of severely burned children who received standard nursing care with another group who were taught to change their own dressings. Those who had an active role in their care required less medication and had fewer complications.

Another study on participation was done in Palo Alto, where a group of asthmatic children were taught about their disease and the drugs used to control it. These children were encouraged to decide for themselves when they needed their medication. The results were amazing. These children missed far fewer days from school and their average rate of emergency room visits dropped from one per month to approximately one visit every six months.

The simple act of “participating in getting well” activates our healing system and begins our movement towards greater physical health. But this is not easy, is it? It means that we must get off our “if’s, and’s or but’s” and actually be involved. Most of us don’t want to do the work it takes to get well. We’d rather slack off, and then when we’re sick or ill, go to the doctor and get a bag of pills, a quick fix, or a magic bullet.

Norman Cousins, the great writer, says: “We regard the doctor as the miracle man who can wave his prescription pad over us like a magic wand and provide us a presto remedy. We expect the surgeon’s knife or the prescription pad to replace the personal discipline required to maintain good health.”

Dedication to getting well is a big commitment. This reminds me of a humorous joke about a girl who gets engaged and says to her girlfriend: “I’ve been wanting to get married for so long, but you know what, now that I’m engaged, I’m really a little scared.” “You should be,” said the girlfriend. “Getting married is a big commitment. Seven or eight years can be a very long time!”

There is no quick fix. True healing (physical, mental, emotional and spiritual) requires a life long commitment to the process of getting well. True healing requires dedication, discipline and hard work. So participate in getting well by developing a passionate involvement with life. Make every day precious and let the fire warm you, even though it may burn you at times.

PRACTICAL APPLICATION: Every day, for the next week, write down one special thing that you can do to “make every day precious.”

Be well. In body and soul,

Neil F. Neimark, M.D.

www.TheBodySoulConnection.com