The Safety of Vasectomy Using No Scalpel, No-Needle Technique

Vasectomy remains one of the most effective and safest methods of contraception. The only technique that would be cheaper is the diaphragm and abstinence. Both of which have a high failure rate. The next few blogs will discuss the safety of vasectomy.

Besides the fact that a vasectomy is very popular, one must remember that there is no form of fertility control, except abstinence, which is completely free of potential complications. In all, vasectomy remains one of the safest and best forms of permanent contraception, provided that the patient is aware of and understands the potential risks associated with the procedure. The side effects and complications of vasectomy are divided into “early” and “late” categories, depending on when they occur. The risks and complications of the procedure, including potential vasectomy pain, are examined below in greater detail.

Vasectomy and Pain

Men worry about pain and discomfort during and after the procedure. In my practice less than 5% of respondents said they had pain, much lower than the well-recognized and commonly published rate. In addition, seldom do any of the men require post operative pain medication. I suggest bed rest and ice over the scrotum the day of the procedure and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication such as Tylenol or Aleve for post operative pain.

Early Complications

Shortly after the procedure there may be mild discomfort, and most men are able to return to work in 1-2 days. A small amount of oozing (light bleeding, less than the size of a quarter) and swelling in the area of the tiny opening are not unusual. This should subside within 72 hours. Occasionally, the skin of the scrotum and base of the penis turn black and blue. This is not painful, lasts only a few days, and goes away without treatment. For a period of 7 days following the vasectomy, sex should be avoided. Strenuous exercise (for example climbing, riding motorcycles or bicycles, playing tennis or racquetball) should also be avoided for 7 days, and nothing heavier than 8-10 pounds should be lifted after the procedure until day 7 when all activities including heavy lifting can begin.

Rarely (less than 1%), a small blood vessel may bleed into the scrotum and continue to bleed and form a clot of blood (hematoma). A small clot will be reabsorbed by the body with time, but a large one usually requires drainage through a surgical procedure.

Importantly, the vasectomy procedure is not always 100% effective in preventing pregnancy because, on rare occasions, the cut ends of the vas may rejoin. This occurs very infrequently; the published rate is about 1 in every 600 vasectomies. My vasectomy failure rate, defined as either persistent motile sperm in the ejaculate or a pregnancy after the procedure, is less than 1/1000 cases.

Since sperm can survive for several months in the vas deferens above the point where they were interrupted, it is very important that another form of contraceptive is used until sterility is assured. To determine whether the ejaculate is devoid of sperm, an ejaculate must be brought in for formal microscopic examination after the procedure. Since “clearing the tubes” through ejaculation is a relatively inefficient process, it make take 15 ejaculations to empty the system entirely of sperm. In terms of time after the procedure, roughly 90% of men will have no sperm in the ejaculate 3 months later. This is the reason we ask men to provide us with a semen sample after 15 ejaculations or 3 months after the vasectomy. Occasionally, it may take 6 months or longer after the procedure to flush out all the sperm. The semen specimen must demonstrate no sperm before unprotected intercourse is permitted.

Bottom Line: Vasectomy is a safe form of sterilization and there are few complications.  Each man who considers proceeding with a vasectomy needs to weigh the benefits vs. the risks and complications associated with the procedure.  Most men will find that the procedure is the best way to proceed with contraception.

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