Archive for the ‘Sexually transmitted disease’ Category

Vaccine and Hygiene For Preventing HPV STD

January 8, 2013

Vaccines are available to guard against a variety of different
infections and illnesses and are indicated for a number of different
patient populations. This blog will focus on human papillomavirus
(HPV).

Most HPV infections are asymptomatic and typically resolve in 1-2
years. the HPV infection is not female specific as the infection can
cause genital warts, warts in the throat, oral and anal cancers. The
HPV vaccine can prevent most of these cases if the vaccine is given
before exposure to the virus. If the HPV vaccine is given at an early
enough age, the vaccine can also prevent vaginal cancer in females.

Two vaccines have been developed for the prevention of HPV and both
vaccines are offered as a 3-dose series that is typically completed
over six months.

Gardasil vaccine provides immunity against HPV infections of 6, 11,
16, and 18 genotypes. Genotypes 6 and 11 are associated with the
majority fo cases of condyloma accuminata or genital warts.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended
the routine use of Gardasil for boys and young men 9-26 years of age
for the prevention of genital warts and other HPV related disease in
men and bosy. It is recommended that boys and men receiving the
injections complete the entire series for maximum protection.

Bottom Line: HPV is a common sexually transmitted disease, most
infections are asymptomatic, however certain types can casue cancer of
the penis, vagina, and throat. Early vaccination in both boys and
girls helps prevent infection and future complications. For more
information contact your physician or pediatrician.

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Deciding Upon the Prime Cut- The Circumcision Decision

December 28, 2012

No descriptor required!

No descriptor required!


Parents often ruminate about the decision to circumcise their young baby boys. Certainly if you are of the Jewish faith, there is no question that you will consider cicrcumcision for your new baby boy. For non-Jews, and non-Moslems, the decision is much more difficult.

New evidence is out that circumcision reduces the risk of sexually transmitted diseases. A review of current medical research points out that the medical benefits of circumcision outweigh the risk of the procedure. Circumcised infants are 90
% less liekly than uncircumcised infants to develop urinary tract infections. Later in life, the circumcised boys are at a lower risk of contracting HIV, herpes, penile cancer, and human papilomavirus, which when passed to female partners, can cause cervical cancer. The serious complicaitons occur in only about 0.2 percent of baby boys who under the operation.

Bottom Line: The circumcision decision is often difficult for most parents to make. I suggest you speak to your pediatrician and obstetrician about the “prime cut.”

When It Really Hurts Down There-Epididymitis

June 3, 2012

When men experience a painful testicle, it can be frightening and a source of not only pain but anxiety as most men associate the testicles with pleasure and reproduction. This article will discuss a common cause of pain in the scrotum and what treatment options are available.
Epididymitis is an inflammation of the coiled tube (epididymis) at the back of the testicle that stores and carries sperm. Pain and swelling are the most common signs and symptoms of epididymitis. Epididymitis is most common in men between the ages of 14 and 35.
Epididymitis is most often caused by a bacterial infection or by a sexually transmitted disease (STD), such as gonorrhea or chlamydia. In some cases, the testicle also may become inflamed.
Epididymitis symptoms include: Testicle pain and tenderness, usually on one side, painful urination, painful intercourse or ejaculation, chills and fever, a lump on the testicle, discharge from the penis especially if the cause is from a STD, and discoloration of the semen.

Location of the epididymis

Location of Epididymis On Top and Behind the Testicle

Causes
Epididymitis has a number of causes, including: STDs, particularly gonorrhea and chlamydia, are the most common cause of epididymitis in young, sexually active men. Boys, older men and homosexual men are more likely to have epididymitis caused by a nonsexually transmitted bacterial infection. For men and boys who’ve had urinary tract infections or prostate infections, bacteria may spread from the infected site to the epididymis. Rarely, epididymitis is caused by a fungal infection. Epididymitis may be caused by urine going backward into the epididymis. This is called chemical epididymitis and may occur with heavy lifting or straining.

Diagnosis
Your doctor will do a physical exam, which may reveal enlarged lymph nodes in your groin and an enlarged testicle on the affected side. Your doctor also may do a rectal examination to check for prostate enlargement or tenderness and order blood and urine tests to check for infection and other abnormalities.
Other tests your doctor might order include: STD testing. This involves obtaining a sample of discharge from your urethra. Your doctor may insert a narrow swab into the end of your penis to obtain the sample, which is then tested for the presence of bacteria or other infectious organisms. The results can be used to select the most effective antibiotic for treatment.
Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive test, which uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of structures inside your body and is used to rule out conditions, such as twisting of the spermatic cord (testicular torsion) or a testicular tumor. Your doctor may use this test if your symptoms began with sudden, severe pain.
A nuclear scan of the testicles is also used to rule out testicular torsion, this test involves injecting trace amounts of radioactive material into your bloodstream. Special cameras then can detect areas in your testicles that receive less blood flow, indicating torsion, or more blood flow, supporting the diagnosis of epididymitis.

Treatment
Epididymitis caused by a sexually transmitted infection (STI) or other infection is treated with antibiotic medications. If you have significant pain, you will probably receive an anti-inflammatory medication. Your sexual partner will also need treatment.
When you’ve finished your medication, it’s a good idea to return to your doctor for a follow-up visit to be sure that the infection has cleared up. If it hasn’t, your doctor may try another antibiotic. If the infection still doesn’t clear, your doctor may do further tests to determine whether your epididymitis is caused by something other than a bacterial infection or an STD.

To ease your symptoms, try these suggestions: Bed rest-depending on the severity of your discomfort, you may want to stay in bed one or two days. Mild relief will occur if you place a folded towel under your scrotum. Wear an athletic supporter or jockey underwear. A supporter provides better support than boxers do for the scrotum. Apply cold packs to your scrotum. Wrap the pack in a thin towel and remove the cold pack every 30 minutes. Don’t have sex until your infection has cleared up. Ask your doctor when you can have sex again.

Bottom Line: Epididymitis is a common cause of scrotal pain. Epididymitis is usually a result of an infection and can be successfully treated with antibiotics. See your doctor whenever you have scrotal pain or you find a lump or bump in your scrotum.

Seniors Don’t Have To Be Sexy To Have Sex

February 13, 2012

Studies have shown that 70 percent of men and 35 percent of women continue to be sexually active over the age of 70. Sexual interest continues throughout life and seniors today need to know that they can still be intimate during their golden years.

Here are the truths behind the myths regarding seniority and sex.

Misconception: Lack of interest in being intimate.

Reality: Sexual interest continues throughout life. Society tends to have an ageist concept of intimacy, feeling sex among seniors is inappropriate or unnatural. There are enough men for women who are interested and many social outlets for seniors to meet others with whom they can become intimate. These include various organizations or clubs, church groups, dance functions, etc.

Misconception: Inability to perform.

Reality: Complications from aging, such as having to take more medications with side effects and chronic illness, may interfere with sexual function, but they do not eliminate it.

Misconception: Sexual dysfunction cannot be treated.

Reality: Erectile dysfunction is not always an inevitable consequence of aging, but it can often be a result of medications or anxiety. A person’s overall health may also be a concern, so be sure to discuss any issues you are having with your doctor. Medication to alleviate this condition is an option but only with doctor approval.

Misconception: Common illness or disabilities warrants stopping any sexual activity.

Reality: Intimacy is possible for those who may have some medical issues. Those with bone and joint limitations; limited cardiac and pulmonary reserve; and cognitive disorders can have sex, it just may take some patience and creativity. Common concerns include:

Heart disease: risk is low for another heart attack to occur while being intimate; in fact, an active sex life may decrease the risk of a future heart attack.

Diabetes: one of the few diseases that can cause impotence. Once diabetes is diagnosed and controlled, however, potency in most cases may be restored.

Stroke: rarely damages physical aspects of sexual function, and it is unlikely that sexual exertion will cause another stroke. Using different positions or medical devices that assist body functions can help make up for any weakness or paralysis that may have occurred.

Arthritis: can produce pain that limits sexual activity. Surgery and drugs can relieve these problems, but in some cases the medicines used can decrease sexual desire. Exercise, rest, warm baths, and changes in position and timing of sexual activity (such as avoiding evening and early-morning hours of pain) can be helpful.

Prostatectomy: rarely affects potency. Except for a lack of seminal fluid, sexual capacity and enjoyment after a prostatectomy should return to the pre-surgery level.

Misconception: Seniors cannot contract STDs.

Reality: Anyone who is not practicing safe sex is exposed to the risk of contracting a STD. According to Today’s Research on Aging, adults age 50 and older accounted for 10 percent of new HIV infections in the United States in 2006. In 2007, 34 percent of adults age 50 and older were living with AIDS. Find the safest method that works best for you.

** Remember, sexual activity is normal, healthy behavior. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions regarding sexual activity. There are many ways to be intimate without engaging in sexual intercourse. Intimacy can also be achieved through touching, holding hands, long walks, dancing and other forms of shared experiences. Communication between partners is most important.

Is oral sex worse than tobacco?! … Say it ain’t so!

March 6, 2011

Caroline May – The Daily Caller – Tue Feb 22, 11:54 am ET

Oral sex — not tobacco — could now be the leading cause of throat cancer among people under 50!

American scientists now say that oral cancer caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV) has become more prevalent in the U.S. than oral cancer caused by tobacco.  Scientists have found a 225 percent increase in the number of oral cancer cases in the U.S. during the last three decades.  The single greatest risk factor is the number of partners on whom the person has performed oral sex. Studies have shown that people who have performed oral sex on more than six partners have an eight times greater risk of developing head or neck cancer than their perhaps less promiscuous peers.

In the last two decades, incidents of oral cancer in the U.S. from HPV have doubled.

 

HPV has gotten attention in recent years for causing cervical cancer in women.  Some states now mandate recommend Gardasil as preventative vaccines. With this troubling data, however, researchers are advising boys and men to get vaccinated as well.

in mass vaccinations, there is no fail safe.

 

Teenagers really have no idea that oral sex is related to any outcome like STIs (sexually transmitted infections), HPV, chlamydia etc.

 

Bottom Line: Cigarettes are bad and cause more than oral cancer.  Oral sex may be a vehicle for transmitting a STD and one of the best preventions is to get the vaccination, Gardasil.

 

Safe Sex May Be Just A Spray Away!-Spray On Condoms

November 9, 2010

Good news for men whose penises are either so large or so small that they can’t find a condom to fit them: A German inventor has come up with a sprayed-to-measure system that should ensure a snug fit for even the most unusual sizes.

A German condom expert has developed a “spray-on condom” system in the form of a pump that squirts out liquid latex that cover the erect penis with a latex sheath.  If you go into a drug store to buy condoms, the ones they sell are mainly suited to men with the average penis length of 5.5 inches, but a lot of people have penises that are smaller or larger than that. Jan Krause, director of the Institute for Condom Consultancy, thought developing a condom that fits the man rather than the man fitting the condom.

The system works a bit like a car wash. The man put his penis in a chamber and presses a button to start the jets of liquid latex. A puff of latex is delivered to the penis forming a condom around the penis that is form-fitting and customized exactly for the man.  The rubber dries in seconds and is later rolled off and discarded like a conventional condom.

The spray-on condom will be more expensive than conventional ones. The cost is around €1 or $1.39 per condom, compared with around 50 cents per conventional sheath.

The condoms will be available in red, green, yellow and transparent, but they won’t come in different flavors!

Bottom Line: The spray on condom gives new meaning to “Puff the Magic Dragon”!

 

Herpes-The Other STD

May 4, 2010

Twenty five years ago, when someone had a herpes infection, they thought it was a curse for life.  Today, with other sexually transmitted diseases (STD) that are life-threatening, herpes infections are much less frightening and terrifying.

Herpes is one of the most common STDs and affects nearly 50 million Americans or one in five adolescents and adults have had herpes infections.  This article will review the cause, the symptoms, the diagnosis, the treatment and the prevention of this disease.

Herpes is caused by two different but closely related viruses.  Herpes type 1 (HSV-1) was usually associated with oral lesions and HSV-2 primarily affected the genital organs.  Today, we know that both viruses can be located in either the mouth or genital locations.

The most common symptoms are a recurring rash that develops into cluster of blisters or sores.  The sores may appear anywhere on the body, but in men, the most common areas are the penis, lips, mouth and anus.  In women they can occur around the labia of the vagina.  Other symptoms include pain, itching, burning with urination, fever, headaches, and a general run-down feeling or malaise.

Herpes is spread by touching, kissing, and sexual contact during vaginal, anal and oral intercourse.  Herpes is most contagious from the time the sores are visible until the sores are completely healed.    The first outbreak of sores usually begins from 2-20 days the virus enters the body.  The sores usually heal in about three weeks.  However, even thought the sores heal, the virus remains in the body.  Later it can “flare up” and result in a recurrence.  Recurrent outbreaks occur on average 4-6 times a year.  Once a person has herpes, the virus remains in the body in a dormant or inactive state forever.   Most men and women who have recurrent infections are unable to pinpoint what triggers a herpes outbreak.  Some will identify lack of sleep, poor diet, fatigue and stress as causes of recurrences.

While there is no cure for genital herpes, there are treatment options available.  Antiviral medications can shorten and prevent outbreaks during the period of time the person takes the medication. In addition, daily suppressive therapy for symptomatic herpes can reduce transmission to partners.  These antiviral drugs such as Zovirax, Valtrex and Famvir can speed up the healing of the sores, decreases the duration of symptoms and reduce the frequency of recurrences.

Prevention of herpes

The surest way to avoid transmission of sexually transmitted diseases, including genital herpes, is to abstain from sexual contact, or to be in a long-term mutually monogamous relationship with a partner who has been tested and is known to be uninfected.

Genital ulcer diseases can occur in both male and female genital areas that are covered or protected by a latex condom, as well as in areas that are not covered. Correct and consistent use of latex condoms can reduce the risk of genital herpes only when the infected area or site of potential exposure is protected. Since a condom may not cover all infected areas, even correct and consistent use of latex condoms cannot guarantee protection from genital herpes.

Persons with herpes should abstain from sexual activity with uninfected partners when lesions or other symptoms of herpes are present. It is important to know that even if a person does not have any symptoms he or she can still infect sex partners. Sex partners of infected persons should be advised that they may become infected. Sex partners can seek testing to determine if they are infected with HSV. A positive HSV-2 blood test most likely indicates a genital herpes infection.

Bottom line: Men and women with genital herpes can and do have happy, productive, and sexually fulfilling lives and can have healthy children, too.  For more information the National Herpes Resource Center at herpesnet@ashastd.org

The Vaccine For HPV Infections in Women

April 25, 2010

Human papillomavirus (HPV)causes one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases (STD). HPV can infect the genital area of men and women including the skin of the penis, the vagina, cervix, or rectum. Most people who become infected with HPV will not have any symptoms.  Some of these viruses may cause abnormal PAP tests and may also lead to cancer of the cervix.  This article will discuss the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment of HPV.

Approximately 20 million Americans are currently infected with HPV. At least 50 percent of sexually active men and women acquire genital HPV infection at some point in their lives. By age 50, at least 80 percent of women will have acquired genital HPV infection.

Some HPVs may cause genital warts. Genital warts are single or multiple growths or bumps that appear in the genital area. Genital warts usually appear as soft, moist, pink, or flesh-colored swellings, usually in the genital area. They can be raised or flat, single or multiple, small or large, and sometimes cauliflower shaped. They can appear on the vulva, in or around the vagina or anus, on the cervix, and on the penis, scrotum, groin, or thigh. After sexual contact with an infected person, warts may appear within weeks or months, or not at all.  Genital warts are diagnosed by visual inspection. Visible genital warts can be removed by medications the patient applies, or by removing the warts in the doctor’s office.

Most women are diagnosed with HPV on the basis of abnormal PAP tests. A PAP test is the primary cancer-screening tool for cervical cancer or pre-cancerous changes in the cervix, many of which are related to HPV. Also, a specific test, HPV-DNA, is available to detect the virus in women. The results of HPV-DNA testing can help health care providers decide if further tests or treatment are necessary.

Approximately 1\3 of HPV viruses can lead, in rare cases, to development of cervical cancer.  Although only a small proportion of women have persistent infection, persistent infection with “high-risk” types of HPV is the main risk factor for cervical cancer.  Cervical cancer is the second leading cancer killer of women worldwide.  About 10,520 American women will develop invasive cervical cancer and about 3,900 women will die from this disease. Most women who develop invasive cervical cancer have not had regular cervical cancer screening.  With early detection, cervical cancer is usually treatable.

A PAP test can detect pre-cancerous and cancerous cells on the cervix. Regular PAP testing and careful medical follow-up, with treatment if necessary, can help ensure that pre-cancerous changes in the cervix caused by HPV infection do not develop into life threatening cervical cancer. The PAP test is responsible for greatly reducing deaths from cervical cancer.

Currently, the only HPV vaccine approved by the federal Food and Drug Administration is Gardasil, which protects against some strains of HPV.  It is recommended that the vaccine be given to girls between 11 and 12 years of age, before they become sexually active. The vaccine, which consists of three shots totaling $360, protects against strains of the virus that cause about 70 percent of cervical cancer cases.

There are no serious side effects from the vaccine.  The only problems noted were mild soreness around the site of the injection and occasionally, a slight temperature.

Bottom Line: HPV is a common virus that affects millions of American men and women.  The virus is responsible for some cases of cervical cancer.  Tests are available to identify which patients are likely to have the virus and which cases need to be treated.  A vaccine is available which can help prevent HPV infections if given to girls before they become sexually active.  See your physician for more information.