Archive for the ‘penis’ Category

Penis Size-Facts, Fiction, and What You Can Do To Get a Bigger Penis

November 5, 2013

“It’s not the size that counts, it’s how you use it.”
– Anonymous

As a urologist I am asked every day “Is my penis normal? What can I do to make it larger?” One of the most widely searched topics on AskMen.com, penis size has remained an enduring interest to men for decades and is understandably a source of much anxiety. However, while size does matter, it really does not matter as much as most men think. The issue here is one of perception: Men perceive it as the defining element of their masculinity, while women often evaluate the whole package: looks, style, intelligence, personality, behavior, and even a man’s sense of humor.

Regardless of whose perceptions are misplaced, penis size will forever persist as a primary concern for men worldwide, which is why AM has explored the topic so deeply. Look no further, as all you need to know is here, standing at the ready.

Penis Size Fact
When surveyed, women consistently claimed that girth was more important than length. This surprising response is seemingly odd as there appears to be no physiological basis for such claims, although more girth may provide more clitoral stimulation.

In fact, plenty of well-endowed men are ashamed of their penises, while lots of men with smaller penises strut their stuff with confidence, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

Men worry far more than women about penis size, according to Veale and his colleagues. One study, published in April in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that women preferred larger penises only up to a point anything bigger than a flaccid length of 2.99 inches did not additionally impress women.

So what is average? A recent Journal of Sexual Medicine study found that the average American man’s penis measures 5.6 inches long when erect.

Now let me leave you with a guaranteed method to make your penis 1-1.5 inches longer. Let me ask you if I could offer you a pill that would lower your blood pressure, decrease your risk of diabetes, lower your cholesterol level, decrease your risk of prostate cancer and colon cancer, improve your mood and libido or sex drive, help you lose weight, it’s very inexpensive and, yes, it will make your penis longer, would you take the pill? Every man answers, “Yes, of course. Where do I get those pills? I then smile at the man and say, “I’m sorry, it’s not a pill, it’s exercise!” Why is this the case? When you exercise, lose weight and lose the girth of your abdomen, your penis will appear longer. If you don’t believe me, try it. Lose 25 pounds and see for yourself. You’ll also be able to see your toes or shoes, too!

Bottom Line: It’s true, use it or lose it. It’s a good idea to have regular sex and to not be preoccupied with the length of your Johnson!

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Don’t let Your Zipper Ripper Your “Nipper”-Zipper Injuries and Your Manhood

March 24, 2013

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According to a study published this month in the British Journal of Urology an estimated 17,616 people wound up in U.S. emergency rooms between 2002 and 2012 because they caught their penises in zippers.

Let the truth be told, zipper injuries are the single most common cause of penile injury in adult men reporting to emergency rooms. While permanent damage is rare, zipper entrapment has led to surgical intervention such as undesired circumcision. (Just one more reason to have a circumcision even if you are not Jewish!)

Bottom Line: In case of an unfortunate zip, it’s best to try to free one’s penis gently by backing the zipper down. If that doesn’t work, don’t struggle but head for the nearest ER. And don’t be too embarrassed. You’re not alone you’ve got over 1000 buddies who have been there before you!

Sex and The Senior Man-Help Is Available For Men With ED

January 20, 2013

It wasn’t too long ago that erectile dysfunction (ED) was believed to be a natural part of aging.  Nothing could be further from the truth.  Middle age and older men who are healthy and have an opportunity to have sexual intimacy can expect to be successful in the bedroom. 

 Once taboo, ED has emerged from the shadows, thanks in large part to the widespread media attention give to Viagra, Levitra and Cialis. However, a wide variety of treatment options are now available that provide hope for men of any age suffering from ED symptoms. There simply is no reason to suffer in silence, whatever your age.

 Approximately 30 million men in the U.S. suffer from ED. An estimated 50 percent of men at age 50 experience some ED symptoms, and the percentage jumps 10% with each decade in life.

 Most men certainly aren’t willing to accept a decline in our eyesight with age—we use glasses when needed. In much the same way, ED is more than a minor inconvenience and can seriously impact quality of life for men and their partners.

 Related Health Risks

ED is a medical condition and can be an early warning sign of a much more serious condition, such as diabetes, heart disease, elevated cholesterol levels or disease of the blood vessels to the brain, which could lead to stroke. ED symptoms can also be a manifestation of depression.  This makes it even more important to pay attention to your ED symptoms.

 Aside from these physical symptoms, ED can take a serious toll on your overall well-being and mental health, causing strain on your relationships and unnecessary anguish and stress.

 Talk to Your Doctor

Talking to your doctor about your ED symptoms can feel embarrassing or difficult, but there’s no reason to be ashamed or uncomfortable. An active sex life can be just as important to your overall health as is proper nutrition and exercise.

 When you visit the doctor, tell him/her about other medical conditions you may have so you can determine whether your ED may be the symptom of a greater problem. Make a separate appointment to discuss ED, to make sure you have enough time to discuss your concerns. Ask for a referral to a urologist, a doctor who specializes in men’s urinary and sexual health issues.

 Be sure to discuss the all the possible issues surrounding your ED, the hurdles you face in all areas of sexual function, including your ability to get and keep an erection, sensitivity and other issues that may help pinpoint the root cause.

 Treatment Options

For many men, oral medications are not only very safe, but also quite effective. Pills such as Viagra, Levitra and Cialis are effective for about 70% of men. But for those with other health factors, such as cardiac disease, diabetes, oral medication may not be an option, or they may become less effective over time. For these men, there are a number of other treatment options available, including:

  • Vacuum pump therapy, which requires the use of a small pump to mechanically enhance blood flow and create an erection. These devices are totally noninvasive, but they can be somewhat awkward to use and not conducive to spontaneity.
  • Transurethral suppositories are tiny pellets of medication inserted into the urethra opening – a minimally invasive treatment, but still somewhat uncomfortable. This also requires some advance preparation.
  • Injection therapy, while the concept is disturbing to most men at the start, involves the use of a very fine needle to inject medication to produce an erection. Because of both the psychological and physical discomfort, in spite of high levels of effectiveness, many men do not find this to be a long-term solution. About 50% of men who try injections, do not continue their use.
  • Penile prosthetic implants are surgical devices concealed within the body that restore erectile function to as near natural as possible and still allow for spontaneity. While the concept itself is nothing new, the devices and implantation procedures have evolved considerably to make the procedure quicker and easier on the patient. While implants carry the same risks associated with any surgery, implant procedures generally have extremely high success rates and provide an effective solution for many men. Implants may not be for everyone, but they are a viable option to restore erectile function for most men over the age of 50, and they carry a very high satisfaction rate among patients and partners.

 Choosing a treatment that’s right for you depends on a number of factors, including your relationship status, the importance and level of physical intimacy required, and other health issues. Ask your doctor about the success rate and risks with each option and about what you can reasonably expect in the form of results. It’s unlikely that any treatment will restore erectile function back to the way it was in your younger years, especially with advanced age, but ED treatment can allow all men to enjoy and active and satisfying sex life well into their golden years.

 No matter what your age, it’s important to take that first step and talk to your doctor about ED symptoms. It’s never “normal” at any age to not have normal sexual function. With the wide variety of treatment options available, there’s no longer any reason to ignore the problem as a fact of life.

Bottom Line: ED is not a natural consequence of aging.  Help is available and no one needs to suffer the tragedy of the bedroom.

 

Modified article by Gerald Brock. By Healthy Aging Admin Published 09/16/2010 Health News

Sex and The Male Senior Citizen

November 24, 2012

Couple in Love

Couple In Love


You are 60 years of age and you note that your erections are not as strong as there were at 40 years of age. It takes longer to get an erection than a decade ago and once you ejaculate it takes longer to get the next erection. Welcome, guys to the middle ages. These are normal consequences of aging for men. This doesn’t mean that you pack up your penis and never use it again. It means that you will use it differently than years ago.

What are the normal, expected changes in a man’s penis as he ages?

Appearance. There are two major changes. The head of the penis (glans) gradually loses its purplish color, the result of reduced blood flow. And there is a slow loss of pubic hair. You don’t have to worry about your manscape as nature will take care of your pubic hair for you.

Penis Size.
Weight gain is common as men grow older. As fat accumulates on the lower abdomen, the apparent size of the penis changes. A large clump of fat in the lower abdomen makes the penile shaft look shorter. If you want a bigger penis, check out your core and trim it down and your penis will grow larger….or at least it will appear to be longer.
In addition to this apparent shrinkage (which is reversible) the penis tends to undergo an actual (and irreversible) reduction in size. The reduction — in both length and thickness — typically isn’t dramatic but may be noticeable. “If a man’s erect penis is 6 inches long when he is in his 30s, it might be 5 or 5-and-a-half inches when he reaches his 60s or 70s.
What causes the penis to shrink? At least two mechanisms are involved, experts say. One is the slow deposition of fatty substances (plaques) inside tiny arteries in the penis, which impairs blood flow to the organ. This process, known as atherosclerosis, is the same one that contributes to blockages inside the coronary arteries — a leading cause of heart attack.
Another mechanism involves the gradual buildup of relatively inelastic collagen (scar tissue) within the stretchy fibrous sheath that surrounds the erection chambers. Erections occur when these chambers fill with blood. Blockages within the penile arteries — and increasingly inelastic chambers — mean smaller erections.

As penis size changes, so do the testicles. Starting around age 40, the testicles definitely begin to shrink. The testicles of a 30-year-old man might measure 2 inches in diameter, he says; those of a 60-year-old, perhaps only 1.5 inches.

Curvature. If penile scar tissue accumulates unevenly, the penis can become curved. This condition, known as Peyronie’s disease, occurs most commonly in middle age. It can cause painful erections and make intercourse difficult. The condition may require surgery.

Sensitivity. Numerous studies have shown that the penis becomes less sensitive over time. This can make it hard to achieve an erection and to have an orgasm.

Libido or sex drive
As men get older the testosterone level falls. Testosterone is the hormone produced in the testicles that is responsible for the sex drive. It reaches a peak in the 20’s and early 30’s and slowly declines at a rate of 2% a year. Men who have this problem can obtain a blood test, a serum testosterone test, and if it is low and there is no history of prostate cancer, then the man can receive testosterone supplements in the form of an injection every two weeks, the application of a daily gel to the lower abdomen or shoulders, or the insertion of a pellet under the skin which lasts for 4-6 months.

Bottom Line: Yes, there are changes that are going to occur as a man ages just as there are changes in muscle mass, bone density, memory, hearing, and vision. But this doesn’t mean the end of a man’s sex life. With good health, a willing partner, and a desire to pleasure your partner, you, too, can enjoy sexual intimacy in your silver years.

5 Things Every Man Needs To Know About His Penis

October 2, 2011

There’s no topic that generates more myths and misinformation than a man’s penis. For example, one myth circulating among males is that men with large shoe sizes or large feet have longer penises. Two urologists at St. Mary’s Hospital in London conducted a study involving 104 men and found no statistically significant correlation between shoe-size and stretched penile length. So ladies, stop looking at a man’s feet and focus on his face and his personality, both of which are not related to his penis length.

Here are some things you might have wondered about your penis, but were afraid to ask.
No. 1: Your Penis Does Have a Mind of Its Own
You’ve probably noticed that your penis often does its own thing. You may remember times when it was completely inappropriate to have an erection; and yet you couldn’t wish it away.
It’s true that you have less command over your penis than body parts like your arms and legs. That’s because the penis answers to a part of the nervous system that’s not always under your conscious control. This is called the autonomic nervous system, which also regulates heart rate and blood pressure and the size of the iris of your eye.
Sexual arousal usually isn’t voluntary. The conscious mind is complicit in it, but a lot of sexual arousal goes on in the sympathetic nervous system. In addition, impulses from the brain during the REM phase of sleep cause erections, whether you’re dreaming about sex or about a test you forgot to study for. Heavy lifting or straining to have a bowel movement can also produce an erection.
Just as the penis grows without your consent, sometimes it shrinks. The flaccid penis varies in size considerably within a given man. Exposure to cold water or air makes your penis shrink. That’s a function of the sympathetic nervous system.
Psychological stress also involves the sympathetic nervous system, and stress has the same effect as a cold shower, Montague says. When you’re relaxed and feeling well, your flaccid penis looks bigger than when you’re stressed out. Psychological stress can result in loss of libido and problems with erections. Both stress and anxiety are leading causes of temporary erectile dysfunction or ED. Being able to manage stress and control anxiety will help you get your erectile function back.
Of course, not all ED is caused by psychological problems such as stress. Physical problems such as atherosclerosis or high blood pressure can inhibit the flow of blood to your penis. Type 2 diabetes can damage both blood vessels and the nerves involved in getting an erection. Excessive alcohol consumption can also interfere with getting an erection.
The penis is kind of a dangling stress test and provides a window to the cardiovascular system including heart disease. So the greeting, “How’s it hanging?” is more apt than you might have realized.
No. 2: Your Penis May Be a ‘Grower’ or a ‘Show-er’
Among men, there is no consistent relationship between the size of the flaccid penis and its full erect length.
In one study of 80 men, researchers found that increases from flaccid to erect lengths ranged widely, from less than a quarter inch to 3.5 inches longer.
Whatever the clinical significance of these data may be, the locker-room significance is considerable. You can’t assume that a dude with a big limp penis gets much bigger with an erection. And the guy whose penis looks tiny could surprise you with whopper.

No. 2: Penis, penis on the wall who is the longest of them all
An analysis of more than a thousand measurements taken by sex researcher Alfred Kinsey shows that shorter flaccid penises tend to gain about twice as much length as longer flaccid penises.
A penis that doesn’t gain much length with an erection has become known as a “show-er,” and a penis that gains a lot is said to be a “grower.” These are not medical terms, and there aren’t scientifically established thresholds for what’s a show-er or a grower.
Kinsey’s data suggest that most penises aren’t extreme show-ers or growers. About 12% of penises gained one-third or less of their total length with an erection, and about 7% doubled in length when erect.
No. 3: Your Penis Is Shaped Like a Boomerang
Your penis is shaped like a boomerang. Just like you don’t see all of a big oak tree above ground, you don’t see the root of your penis tucked up inside your pelvis and attached to your pubic bone.
In an MRI picture, the penis looks distinctly boomerang-like, as noted by a French researcher who studied men and women having sex inside an MRI scanner.
One method of surgical “penis enlargement” is to cut the ligament that holds the root of the penis up inside the pelvis. This operation may give some men a little extra length if more of the penis protrudes from the body, but there are side effects. This ligament, called the suspensory ligament, makes an erection sturdy. With that ligament cut, the erect penis loses its upward angle and it wobbles at the base. The lack of sturdiness can lead to injury.
No. 4: Your penis is not a bone but it can break
There is no penis bone, but you can break your penis all the same. It’s called penile fracture, and it’s not a subtle injury. When it happens, there’s a snap, no crackle, but a pop that can easily be heard by the man his partner. Then the penis turns black and blue. And there’s terrible pain.
Penile fracture is rare, and it typically happens to younger men because their erections tend to be quite rigid.
Here’s how to avoid penile fracture: don’t use your penis too roughly. A common way that penile fracture happens is when a man is thrusting too hard and fast during sex, and slams into his partner’s pubic bone. Also, a woman who moves wildly while on top of a man during sex can break a man’s penis. Most of these penile fractures occurs when there has been too much alcohol consumed.
No. 5: Most Penises in the World Are Untrimmed
A report by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) estimates that worldwide only 30% of males are circumcised.
Rates vary greatly depending upon religion and nationality. Almost all Jewish and Muslim males in the world have circumcised penises, and together they account for about 70% of all circumcised males globally.
The United States has the highest proportion of males circumcised for non-religious reasons. A whopping 75% of non-Jewish, non-Muslim American men are circumcised. Compare that to Canada, where only 30% are. In the U.K. it’s 20%; in Australia it’s merely 6%.
The practice of circumcising baby boys for medical and cosmetic reasons has become controversial in the U.S. But recently the World Health Organization (WHO) and the UUNAIDS recommended circumcision for adult men, based upon evidence that men with circumcised penises have a lower risk of being infected with HIV.
Bottom Line: A man’s best friend is his penis. He needs to know that they come in different sizes and shapes but nearly all of them are able to perform their job if given a chance.

This article was excerpted from an article by Martin F. Downs and appeared in WebMD

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