Archive for the ‘supplements’ Category

Supplements and Testicular Cancer-Is There a Relationship?

May 4, 2015

Testicle cancer is the most common cancer in men between the age of 20-40. The cause of testicle cancer is not known but a recent report suggests a relationship between the use supplements and testicle cancer.
In the United States, 8,500 men are diagnosed with the disease every year. Exactly what causes testicular cancer remains largely a mystery to the scientific community, but a new study published recently in the British Journal of Cancer has uncovered an unexpectedly high correlation between muscle-building supplements and testicle cancer.

The study was conducted by interviewing 356 men who had been diagnosed with testicular germ cell cancer, and 513 men who had not. Researchers asked not only about their supplement use, but also about other factors such as smoking, drinking, exercise habits, family history of testicular cancer, and prior injury to the groin, in order to rule out confounding variables. Supplement use was defined as consuming one or more supplements—such as pills and powders containing creatine or androstenedione—at least once a week for four consecutive weeks or more.

After accounting for confounding influences, as well as age, race, and other demographics, researchers found that men who used supplements had a 65 percent greater risk of having developed testicular cancer than men who did not use supplements.

They also found evidence that application of supplements beyond the moderate definition of supplement use increased risk even further:
Men who used more than one kind of supplement had a 177 percent greater risk.
Men who used supplements for three years or longer had a 156 percent greater risk.
Men who started using supplements at age 25 or younger had a 121 percent greater risk.

Inspired by mounting evidence that at least some supplement ingredients may damage the testes, the study is the first of its kind to explore the possible link between supplements and testicular cancer. The authors hope that future studies and experiments will substantiate their findings.

Bottom Line: No one can say with any degree of certainty that supplements cause testicle cancer. However, until the study is confirmed, the question men everywhere should be asking themselves is, “are the gains worth it?”

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ED (Erectile Dysfunction) – What About Natural Solutions? They May Be Dangerous To Your Health

March 11, 2015

ED (Erectile Dysfunction) – What About Natural Solutions?

ED is a common problem affecting over 30 million American men. For the past 10 years oral medication, Viagra, Cialis, and Levitra have been available for helping me achieve intimacy with their partners. A recent analysis by the FDA has revealed that some of the many over the counter (OTC) supplements contain the same active ingredient in Viagra but often at a higher more dangerous dose than what is prescribed by the doctor.

As reported by BuzzFeed, in the past week as many as 25 “natural supplements” meant to treat erectile dysfunction were found to contain sildenafil citrate, the same active ingredient found in prescription drugs such as Viagra.

Despite an obvious attempt at falsely advertising a prescription drug as an herbal remedy, the unregulated tainted supplements could cause serious harm and even death to those who unknowingly buy them.

Natural erectile dysfunction supplements are both one of the biggest sellers on the market for herbal treatments and one of the most likely to be tainted with unregulated ingredients. It’s suspected the FDA has only hit the tip of the iceberg regarding the current investigation into herbal erectile dysfunction.

The World Health Organization describes counterfeit drugs as a widespread problem, but it occurs most often in developing countries. For example, one study from 2012 found that around one-third of all available malaria medications sold in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa were counterfeit. A press release from the University of Michigan stated that counterfeit drugs kill around 700,000 people every year.

There is hope, though. Last year Pfizer made $1.7 billion off of Viagra sales. This large monetary stake that companies such as Pfizer have in prescription erectile dysfunction medication could be enough to push the regulation of fake drugs to priority level.

Bottom Line: There are effective drugs for treating ED. For the safety of your health and your erections, speak to your doctor or use only the medication prescribed by your physician.

Raise Your Testosterone Level-Au Natural

December 27, 2012

Effects of Testosterone

Effects of Testosterone


Testosterone is the male hormone responsible for sex drive or libido, muscle mass, energy level, and strength of your bones. Many men have a low testosterone level that can easily be checked with a simple blood test. If it is low, there are means to increase the level without taking testosterone supplements.

Begin by looking at your lifestyle. Some changes that are good for the rest of you could also benefit your testosterone level, if it’s low.

1. Get Enough Sleep.

Poor sleep can have consequences for your testosterone level.

Poor sleep is the most important factor that contributes to low testosterone in many men. A lack of sleep affects a variety of hormones and chemicals in your bloodstream. This, in turn, can have a harmful impact on your testosterone. If you’re having problems getting good sleep on a regular basis, talk to your doctor as you may have obstructive sleep apnea or prostate problems that require you to get up multiple times a night and disturb your sleep.

2. Keep a Healthy Weight.

Men who are overweight or obese often have low testosterone levels. For those men, losing the extra weight can help bring testosterone back up.

3. Stay Active.

Testosterone adapts to your body’s needs, Yu says. If you spend most of your time lying on the couch, your brain gets the message that you don’t need as much to bolster your muscles and bones.

But when you are physically active, your brain sends out the signal for more of the hormone. Walking briskly at least 10 to 20 minutes a day is a great way to get started. You can take it to the next level by building strength with several sessions of weights or elastic bands each week.

4. Take Control of Your Stress.

If you’re under constant stress, your body will be churning out a steady stream of the stress hormone cortisol. It will be less able to create testosterone. As a result, controlling your stress is important for keeping up your testosterone. If you are experience increased stress at work, cut back on long work hours. If you’re logging lots of overtime, try to whittle your workday down to 10 hours or less. Spend two hours a day on activities that you enjoy that aren’t work- or exercise-related, such as reading or playing music.

5. Review Your Medications.

Some medicines can cause a drop in your testosterone level. These include: opioids ( fentanyl, MS Contin, and OxyContin), glucocorticoid drugs such as prednisone, and anabolic steroids used for building muscles and improving athletic performance.

6. Forget the Supplements.

Finally, although you’re likely to encounter online ads for testosterone-boosting supplements, you aren’t likely to find any that will do much good. Your body naturally makes a hormone called DHEA that it can convert to testosterone. DHEA is also available in supplement form.

Bottom Line: Testosterone deficiency is a common problem affecting millions of American men. The problem is easily diagnosed with a blood test. Moderate to minimal decreases in the testosterone level can be treated with life style changes. Significant decreases may require testosterone replacement therapy. If you have any questions, see your doctor.

Erectile Dysfunction – Getting It Up With Natural Remedies

August 26, 2012

Mankind has looked for the magic elixir that will help a man obtain and maintain an erection adequate for sexual intimacy. Although there is little scientific evidence that these natural remedies work, there are some that may have a potential to help men with mild sexual problems. This article will review the natural remedies that may be beneficial.
An estimated 30 million American men have erectile dysfunction, and seven out of 10 cases are caused by a potentially deadly condition like atherosclerosis, kidney disease, vascular disease, neurological disease, or diabetes. ED can also be caused by certain medications, surgical procedures on the prostate gland and colon, and psychological problems. Here’s a look at the evidence for and against six of the most popular natural remedies or herbal remedies:

Acupuncture. Though acupuncture has been used to treat male sexual problems for centuries, the scientific evidence to support its use for erectile dysfunction is uncertain. In 2009 South Korean scientists conducted a systematic review of studies on acupuncture for ED. They found that “the evidence is insufficient to suggest that acupuncture is an effective intervention for treating ED.”

Arginine. The amino acid L-arginine, which occurs naturally in food, boosts the body’s production of nitric oxide, a compound that facilitates erections by dilating blood vessels in the penis. Studies examining L-arginine’s effectiveness against impotence have yielded mixed results. A 1999 trial published in the online journal BJU International found that high doses of L-arginine can help improve sexual function, but only in men with abnormal nitric oxide metabolism, such as that associated with cardiovascular disease. In another study, published in 2003 in the Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy, Bulgarian scientists reported that ED sufferers who took L-arginine along with the pine extract pycnogenol saw major improvements in sexual function with no side effects.
One caveat: men with known cardiovascular problems should take it only with a doctor’s supervision; L-arginine can interact with some medications that can affect the heart.

DHEA. Testosterone is essential for a healthy libido and normal sexual function, and erectile dysfunction sufferers known to have low testosterone improve when placed on prescription testosterone replacement therapy. Similarly, studies have shown that taking over-the-counter supplements containing DHEA, a hormone that the body converts to testosterone and estrogen, can help alleviate some cases of ED. But DHEA can cause problems, including suppression of pituitary function, and its long-term safety is unknown.

Ginseng. Korean red ginseng has long been used to stimulate male sexual function, but few studies have tried systematically to confirm its benefits. In one 2002 study involving 45 men with significant ED, the herb helped alleviate symptoms of erectile dysfunction and brought “enhanced penile tip rigidity.” Experts aren’t sure how ginseng might work, though it’s thought to promote nitric oxide synthesis. Again, I suggest that men discuss with their doctor before taking it since ginseng can interact with drugs you may already be taking and cause allergic reactions.

Pomegranate juice. Drinking antioxidant-rich pomegranate juice has been shown to have numerous health benefits, including a reduced risk for heart disease and high blood pressure. Does pomegranate juice also protect against ED? No proof exists, but results of a study published in 2007 were promising. The authors of this small-scale pilot study called for additional research, saying that larger-scale studies might prove pomegranate juice’s effectiveness against erectile dysfunction. Pomegranate juice may help ED but it has other health benefits.

Yohimbe. Before Viagra and the other prescription erectile dysfunction drugs became available, doctors sometimes prescribed a derivative of the herb yohimbe (yohimbine hydrochloride) to their patients suffering from ED. But experts say the medication is not particularly effective, and it can cause jitteriness and other problems. Evidence shows that yohimbe is associated with high blood pressure, anxiety, headache, and other health problems. Experts discourage its use.

Horny Goat Weed. Horny goat weed and related herbs have purportedly been treatments for sexual dysfunction for years. Italian researchers found that the main compound in horny goat weed, called icariin, acted in a similar way as drugs like Viagra.

Ginkgo biloba. Known primarily as a treatment for cognitive decline, ginkgo has also been used to treat erectile dysfunction — especially cases caused by the use of certain antidepressant medications. But the evidence isn’t very convincing. One 1998 study published in the Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy found that it did work. But a more rigorous study, published in Human Pharmacology in 2002, failed to replicate this finding.

Bottom Line: No matter what erectile dysfunction treatment or treatments a man ultimately decides upon, it’s important to eat healthy, to avoid smoking and to limit your alcohol consumption. A loving, receptive, and responsive partner is also a necessary ingredient. After all, it takes two to tango!

Supplement Pills For Your Prostate-Probably Not Effective

March 6, 2012

Saw palmetto fruit extracts are widely used to treat lower urinary tract symptoms attributed to benign enlargement of the prostate gland. However, a new study shows that these extracts are no better than placebo at easing symptoms.
The findings were reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association (2011;306:1344-1351).
In the study, men were randomly assigned to receive a daily dose of saw palmetto extract, beginning 320 mg, or matching placebo. After 24 weeks, the saw palmetto dosage was increased to 640 mg per day. After another 24 week, it was increased to 960 mg per day, which is triple the standard dose. After 48 weeks there was no significant difference between placebo and saw palmetto supplements.
“Now we know that even very high doses of saw palmetto make absolutely no difference,” said study co-investigator Gerald Andriole, MD, Chief of Urologic Surgery at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Bottom Line: Saw palmetto is probably not effective in treating or preventing prostate gland enlargement.

Chicken Soup For The Soul and For the Cold-Natural Cold and Flu Remedies

February 26, 2012

It’s no wonder natural cold and flu remedies are popular — modern medicine has yet to offer a cure for these age-old ailments. While some antiviral drugs can prevent and shorten the flu’s duration, most medications only offer temporary relief of symptoms. Many natural remedies provide temporary relief as well, and a few may actually help you get better. This blog will discuss the most common natural remedies which are available at most health food stores and pharmacies.

Echinacea
Echinacea is an herbal supplement that is believed to boost the immune system to help fight infections. But it’s unclear whether this boost helps fight off colds or flu. Some researchers have reported no benefits, but at least one recent study paints a more positive picture. Patients who took echinacea shortened their colds by an average of 1.4 days. Still, some physicians remain skeptical, and it’s best to check with a doctor before trying this or other herbal remedies
Zinc
Some studies show that zinc appears to have antiviral properties. There is some evidence the mineral may prevent the formation of certain proteins that cold viruses use to reproduce themselves. While zinc does not appear to help prevent colds, some research suggests it may help shorten cold symptom duration and reduce the severity of the common cold when taken within 24 hours of the first symptoms. The FDA recommends against using zinc nasal products for colds because of reports of permanent loss of smell.

Vitamin C
The cold-fighting prowess of vitamin C remains uncertain. Some studies suggest it can help reduce the duration and severity of cold symptoms. In one study, participants who were exposed to extreme physical stress and cold weather — and who took vitamin C — were 50% less likely to get a cold. To prevent side effects, such as diarrhea and stomach upset, the maximum daily intake of vitamin C for adults is 2,000 milligrams.

Chicken Soup
Grandma was onto something. Chicken soup may help cold symptoms in more than one way. Inhaling the steam can ease nasal congestion. Sipping spoonfuls of fluid can help avoid dehydration. And some advocates say the soup may soothe inflammation. Researchers have found chicken soup has anti-inflammatory properties in the lab, though it’s unclear whether this effect translates to real-world colds. But as my wise Jewish mother would say, “It may not help, but it voidn’t hoit!”

Hot Tea
Drinking hot tea offers some of the same benefits as chicken soup. Inhaling the steam relieves congestion, while swallowing the fluid soothes the throat and keeps you hydrated. Black and green teas have the added bonus of being loaded with disease-fighting antioxidants, which may fight colds.

Hot Toddy
The hot toddy is an age-old nighttime cold remedy probably having its beginning during the time of the Civil War. Since you won’t want to drink black tea before bed, make a cup of hot herbal tea. Add a teaspoon of honey, a small shot of whiskey or bourbon, and a squeeze of lemon. This mixture may ease congestion, soothe the throat and help you sleep. Limit yourself to one hot toddy. Too much alcohol can affect the immune system.

Garlic
Garlic has long been touted for legendary germ-fighting abilities. And it is still being promoted as a health food with medicinal properties. Many of the claims surrounding it are not backed by enough research, yet garlic is very nutritious. In addition, it can help spice up your meals when a stuffy nose makes everything taste bland.

Steam/Humidifier
For a heavy dose of steam, use a room humidifier — or simply sit in the bathroom with the door shut and a hot shower running. Breathing in steam can break up congestion in the nasal passages, offering relief from a stuffy or runny nose.

Saline Drops
Dripping saltwater into the nose can thin out nasal secretions and help remove excess mucus, while reducing congestion. Try over-the-counter saline drops, or make your own by mixing 8 ounces of warm water with 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon baking soda. Use a bulb syringe to squirt the mixture into one nostril while holding the other one closed. Repeat 2-3 times and then do the other side.

Menthol Ointment
Days of wiping and blowing your nose can leave the skin around your nostrils sore and irritated. A simple remedy is to dab a menthol-infused ointment under, but not in, the nose. Menthol has mild numbing agents that can relieve the pain of raw skin. As an added benefit, breathing in the medicated vapors that contain menthol or camphor may help open clogged passages and relieve symptoms of congestion. Use only in children over 2 years of age.

Saltwater Gargle
For a sore throat, the traditional saltwater gargle may have some merit. Gargling warm water with a teaspoon of salt four times daily may help keep a scratchy throat moist.

Nasal Strips
Another strategy for relieving nighttime congestion is to try over-the-counter nasal strips. These are strips of tape worn on the bridge of the nose to open the nasal passages. While they can’t unclog the nose, they do increase the nasal openings and allow for improved airflow.

Let Your Fever Work
A fever is the original natural remedy. The rise in temperature actively fights colds and flu by making your body inhospitable for germs. Endure a moderate fever for a couple of days to get better faster. Just be sure to stay well hydrated. Call your doctor right away if the fever is over 104, unless it comes down quickly with treatment. In infants 3 months or younger call your doctor for any fever greater than 100.4. Children with a fever of less than 102 usually don’t require treatment unless they’re uncomfortable.

Bed Rest
With our busy lives, most of us loathe to spend a day or two under the covers. But getting plenty of rest lets your body direct more energy to fighting off germs. Staying warm is also important, so tuck yourself in and give your immune cells a leg up in their noble battle.

Bottom Line: Okay, these remedies aren’t guaranteed to solve all of your flu or cold symptoms. However, there may be weak scientific evidence that they do help reduce the symptoms of the flu or cold.

Vitamins May Not Be All That Helpful

December 28, 2011

It is not unusual to view an advertisement for a vitamin that suggests it helps people with cardiovascular problems, cancer, diabetes, or other chronic diseases. Judging the validity of these advertisements is often difficult due to what often appears to be conflicting data, and the use of personal anecdotes.
What is the evidence? A study was conducted by the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and published in 2006. (The complete report, Multivitamin/Mineral Supplements and Prevention of Chronic Disease can be viewed here)
The study examined the use of vitamins for the prevention of the following:
• breast cancer, colorectal cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, gastric cancer, or any other malignancy (including colorectal polyps)
• myocardial infarction, stroke
• type 2 diabetes mellitus
• Parkinson’s disease, cognitive decline, memory loss, dementia
• cataracts, macular degeneration, hearing loss
• osteoporosis, osteopenia, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis
• hepatitis, non-alcoholic fatty-liver disease
• chronic renal insufficiency, chronic nephrolithiasis
• HIV infection, hepatitis C, tuberculosis
• chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

The results of the study
The authors concluded there is limited evidence to date suggesting potential benefits of multivitamin/mineral supplements in the primary prevention of cancer in individuals with poor nutritional status or suboptimal antioxidant intake.
The evidence also indicates that multivitamin/mineral supplement use does not have significant effects in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and cataracts.
Regular supplementation of a single nutrient or a mixture of nutrients for years has no significant benefits in the primary prevention of cancer, cardiovascular disease, cataract, age-related macular degeneration or cognitive decline.
A few exceptions, that were reported in a single reviewed study included a decreased incidence of prostate cancer with use of synthetic α-tocopherol (50 mg per day) in smokers, a decreased progression of age-related macular degeneration with high doses of zinc alone or zinc in combination with antioxidants in persons at high risk for developing advanced stages of the disease, and a decreased incidence of cancer with use of selenium (200 mcg per day).
Supplementation with calcium has short-term (particularly within one year) benefit on retaining bone mineral density in postmenopausal women, and a possible effect in preventing vertebral fractures. Combined vitamin D3 (700–800 IU/day) and calcium (1000 mg/day) may reduce the risk of hip and other non-vertebral fractures in individuals with low levels of intake. Supplementation with β-carotene increased lung cancer risk in persons with asbestos exposure or cigarette smoking.
Users of Vitamins Beware
The overall quality and quantity of the literature on the safety of multivitamin/mineral supplements is limited. Among the adverse effects reported were vitamin A supplementation may moderately increase serum triglyceride levels. Calcium supplementation may increase the risk of kidney stones. Vitamin E supplementation was associated with an increased incidence of nosebleeds but was not associated with an increased risk of more serious bleeding events.

Bottom Line: Vitamins may be helpful for a few conditions. Nothing beats a good diet with fresh fruits and vegetables, plenty of exercise, and adequate sleep. Vitamins and supplements are not the cure all for many diseases or the major source of disease prevention.

Alternative Treatments of the Enlarged Prostate Gland

November 13, 2011

Most men will have symptoms of prostate gland enlargement after age 50 Those symptoms include frequency of urination, getting up at night to urinate, urgency of urination, and dribbling after urination. There are numerous medications that are effective in reducing the symptoms of the enlarged prostate gland. There are large numbers of men who find that their symptoms are not of significance that require treatment or they are using so many medications that the men don’t want to add any additional medications to their already lengthy list of drugs. There are supplements and vitamins that can be used that may have a role for men who do not want to take additional medications.

Beta-sitosterol

Beta-sitosterol is the main active ingredient in the herbs saw palmetto and pygeum. Both of these herbs do not have enough beta-sitosterol to be of real value in giving you prostate health. Now, beta-sitosterol, which can be obtained from sugar cane pulp, can be purchased in capsule doses of 300 – 600 mg, which gives you an effective dose to eliminate your enlarged prostate. Pygeum can only provide around 30 mg and you need upwards of 600 mg daily.

Flax Seed or Fish Oil

The nutrient to use for the best prostate health diet is flaxseed oil.
Flax seed oil contains more omega-3 than omega-6 and so it makes it a good source of omega-3. The more omega-6 use, from olive oil and other vegetables oils, the more prone you will be to prostate cancer. This is not the case with omega-3 oil and this has been verified through clinical studies.

Omega-3 protects the prostates cells and has anti-inflammatory properties. Using fish oil can also be a better choice than flax seed oil since your body digests it better.

Use 1 – 2 grams of flax seed or fish oil per day.

Soy Isoflavones

Soy Isoflavones have been shown in clinical studies to have good effects on your prostate and should be added to your prostate health diet. These isoflavones are flavones and contain no photoestrogen so the have no estrogen effects in the body.

The active ingredients in the isoflavones are genestein and daidzein.Buy a brand that has up to 40 mg of isoflavones Use this quantity daily.

Ionic Minerals

The prostate needs minerals. Adding these to your prostate health diet is critical. You cannot have good prostate health without plenty of minerals and your regular diet cannot supply what you need.

In addition to these ionic minerals, you need to make sure you get plenty of zinc and selenium. The prostate has more zinc than any other part of the body. So take 15 – 20 mg per day and not to exceed 40 mg.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D is another critical vitamin that you want to make sure you get plenty of. If you are out in the sun a lot, then you will not need to supplement with this vitamin. Otherwise, use up to 800 IU of this vitamin.

Vitamin E

This is the next most important vitamin you should supplement with. Use up to 400 mg per day of the natural mixed tocopherols. Clinical studies have shown that vitamin E can reduce and suppress prostate cancer cells.

Bottom Line: Use, beta sitosterol, isoflavones, minerals, vitamin D, and vitamin E in your prostate health diet and see improvements in your prostate symptoms and health.

Vitamins and Supplements May Not Be The Panacea To Good Health For Women

October 23, 2011

50% of Americans take vitamins and supplements. In 2003, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) found that roughly half of Americans reported taking at least one dietary supplement, creating nearly $20 billion in annual industry profits. And dietary supplement use becomes more common as people get older. The numbers of women who reported taking supplements increased over time — from 63 percent in 1986, to 75 percent in 1997 and 85 percent in 2004.
A recent study shows that for some women, especially older women, were at a slightly increased risk of death and increased risk of developing cancer. For the nutrient conscious, a daily capsule of vitamins and minerals might seem like a sure way to get all the necessary nutrients you could miss in your diet. But a new study from the Annals of Internal Medicine reports that those supplements may not be helpful, and in some cases, could even be harmful for older women.
The study looked at more than 38,000 women age 55 and older who participated in the study since the mid-1980s. The researchers found that when it came to reducing the risk of death, most supplements had no effect on women’s health.
In fact, women who took certain kinds of dietary supplements — vitamin B6, folic acid, magnesium, zinc, copper, iron and multivitamins — faced a slightly higher risk of death than women who did not. Only women who took supplemental calcium showed any reduction in their risk of death.
The findings add to a growing collection of research showing that people who take dietary supplements are getting few health benefits in return. I would conclude that supplements are not protective against chronic diseases.
Experts noted that supplements are beneficial for people who have some kind of nutritional deficiency, like anemia or osteoporosis. But many people who take dietary supplements are healthy and just want to be healthier.
Bottom Line: Based on this new study, people should be even a little more cautious now about taking these supplements. Before starting on a course of vitamins and supplements, speak to your doctor. The best way to ensure that you’re getting all the nutrients you need is still to eat a well-balanced diet.

Diet and prostate cancer-what do you need to know?

March 30, 2011

If you have prostate cancer or if you want to prevent prostate cancer, you will want to read this article about what is known about diet and supplements and the relationship to prostate cancer.

Everyone with prostate cancer who goes on the Internet receives information about green tea preventing prostate cancer, that pomegranate juice can be consumed to lower the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and advice on consuming broccoli and cauliflower.  So what is a man to do?

Numerous studies have been conducted that have looked at vitamin E, selenium, vitamin C and combinations of these 3 supplements. There has been no conclusive study that any of these supplements or vitamins reduce the risk of prostate cancer or prevented the recurrence of prostate cancer.

However there are compelling data supporting the therapeutic potential of a high vegetable diet for prostate cancer. Red meat and fat tend to be associated with increased risk of prostate cancer while broccoli, cauliflower and radishes and tomato products tend to be associated with decreasing the risk of prostate cancer.

So here are my recommendations: 1) avoid supplements for cancer prevention, 2) maintain a diet rich in vegetables and whole grains, 3) limit red meat and refined or processed carbohydrates, and 4) be physically active at least 30 minutes a day.  So go to your grocery store and visit the vegetable counter and pass up the bakery area!  Your prostate gland will thank you!