Archive for the ‘sexual dysfunction’ Category

Little Blue Pill (Viagra) For Men and Now A Little Pink Pill (Addyi) For Women

August 24, 2015

Now women with sexual dysfunction will have a solution to their problem with decrease in libido or sex drive. A 2002 study found that up to one-third of adult women might experience hypoactive sexual desire disorder, a technical term for when women lack sexual desire or fantasy.
Recently the FDA approved flibanserin, which will be sold as Addyi, for the treatment of sexual dysfunction in premenopausal women.
This is the first FDA approved treatment for sexual desire in men or women.

Today’s approval provides women distressed by their low sexual desire with an approved treatment option. The approval is not without warnings. In fact, the agency approved the drug with a risk warning to ensure safety. Of greatest concern, an increased risk of severe low blood pressure, so low it can cause a temporary loss of consciousness. This is more of a concern in patients who drink alcohol while taking the drug. The doctor will be required to warn patients of the risks of consuming alcohol while taking Addyi.

Addyi is frequently referred to as “female Viagra” because it’s a pill for sexual dysfunction in women. However, experts say it’s a misnomer to describe it as such because it works in a distinctly different way to target the brain.
Viagra treats erectile dysfunction, a physical problem, and does not induce sexual desire. Addyi works on the central nervous system, which is why it’s in the same category as an antidepressant.
Another difference is that men take Viagra as needed before a sexual encounter, and women will need to take Addyi once every night. Taking it at night will reduce the likelihood of adverse reactions from low blood pressure and sleepiness or depression from a depressed central nervous system.
Other common side effects include dizziness, nausea, fatigue, insomnia and dry mouth.
In clinical trials, women taking the drug experienced a 37% increase in sexual desire.

Addyi will cost about the same per month as a one month supply of Viagra for men.

Bottom Line: Nearly as many women as men suffer from sexual dysfunction. Addyi is the first drug to address this problem in women. However, women need to be cautious about the use of this new medication. For more information, speak to your physician.

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New Help For the Enlarged Prostate Gland-The Uro-Lift

January 21, 2015

The enlarged prostate is a medical condition in which the prostate gland that surrounds the male urethra (tube in the penis that transports urine and semen located in the penis) becomes enlarged with advancing age and begins to obstruct the urinary system. The condition is common, affecting approximately 37 million men in the United States alone. BPH symptoms include sleepless nights as men are awakened to empty their bladder and urinary problems such as dribbling after urination, frequency of urination, and urgency of urination. This condition can cause loss of productivity, depression and decreased quality of life. About one in four men experience these urinary symptoms by age 55 and by age 70, over 80 percent of men suffer from BPH.

Treatment options
Medication is often the first-line therapy for enlarged prostate, but relief can be inadequate and temporary. Side effects of treatment can include sexual dysfunction, dizziness and headaches, prompting many patients to quit using the drugs. For these patients, the classic alternative is surgery that cuts or ablates prostate tissue to open the blocked urethra. While current surgical options, such as transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP or “roto rooter”), can be very effective in relieving symptoms, it can also leave patients with permanent side effects such as urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction and retrograde ejaculation (dry orgasm).

A new study in published in Urology Practice, an official journal of the American Urological Association, concluded that the UroLift System preserves sexual function and provides rapid improvement in symptoms, flow and quality of life that are sustained to two years.

UroLift, which provides rapid relief of enlarged prostate symptoms with minimal side effects, are durable for at least two years after treatment, with less than one in ten patients requiring an additional procedure for symptom relief. At two years only 7.5% of patients required an additional procedure for lower urinary tract symptoms. Adverse events were typically early, mild and transient. There was no occurrence of de novo sustained ejaculatory or erectile dysfunction\impotence.

Bottom Line: Millions of American men suffer from the enlarged prostate gland. Help is available often starting with medication. Another option is Uro-Lift which can be done in the ambulatory treatment center and has immediate results.

A Two-Minute Solution To Solving Your Lack of Orgasms

December 28, 2014

If asked the young women readers, if I could give you a pill that would reduce your loss of urine, improve the muscle and strength in your pelvis and increase your chances of reaching an orgasm, would you like a prescription? Every woman I ask about this medication always says yes they would like a prescription. Now if I told them, it wasn’t a pill but it was a simple exercise that they could do for just two minutes a day, that they could do anywhere, at almost any time, which would accomplish those above objectives many of the women would say no, not interested. How about writing for that pill?

Let me introduce you to Kegel exercises. Kegel exercises are an easy way of strengthening both your vaginal wall muscles and the muscles that control urination and bowel movements (which can also reduce the effects of urinary incontinence.

Older women and women who have had children are especially at risk of weakened pelvic floor muscles.

All you have to do is contract and release the muscles in the pelvic area, squeezing them for 5-10 seconds and then relaxing for 5 seconds each time.

The most important thing is to locate the muscles you’re trying to strengthen, and to get used to the sensation of exercising them. The best way of doing this is to try to stop your urine mid-flow when you go to the restroom. If you do this successfully then you’ve found the muscles you’re looking for.

I suggest that you repeat the cycle of contracting and relaxing ten times per session, and try to fit in three sessions per day which should take you just two minutes. This shouldn’t be difficult as, going to the gym, using weights, doing push-ups or lunges. Honestly, these exercises can be done anywhere, at anytime, without anyone even realizing you’re doing them.

If done properly, you should notice a difference (enhanced sensation during sex and less leakage) in 4-6 weeks.

According to sex experts, it’s not just women who can benefit from Kegel exercises: “Pelvic floor exercises can also benefit men with problems such as erectile dysfunction (difficulty getting or keeping an erection), premature ejaculation, or difficulty with urination.

Bottom Line: A Kegel a day may just keep the doctor away and put a little zing in your sex life. Try it for a few weeks and if you aren’t completely satisfied, I’ll refund your money! ☺

For more information on Kegel exercises go to my website:

http://neilbaum.com/articles/pelvic-exercises-for-women-kegel-exercise

or go to YouTube.com for a video on the same subject

New Baby? Your Little Darling May Just Impact Your Sex Life

December 20, 2014

Many women experience sexual problems after giving birth. This blog will discuss the issues and concerns associated with childbirth and its impact on a woman’s sexual functioning.

Most obstetricians\gynecologists recommend that women avoid vaginal intercourse for at least six week after delivery. Sexual function may not return to prepregnancy levels for up to six months following delivery. The causes are the mother’s concerns about caring for a new baby, breastfeeding, fatigue, pain during attempted or actual intercourse, postpartum depression, pelvic floor problems, urinary incontinence and body image issues.

Sexuality in pregnancy is different in every woman. The frequency of sex may change and sexual enjoyment may decline during pregnancy. However, the good news is that relationship satisfaction remains unchanged. Many women experience a decline in sexual activity during the first trimester of pregnancy as a result of fatigue, fear of causing a miscarriage, breast tenderness, and nausea. The third trimester is also a time of diminished sexual activity due to overall physical discomfort.

Many women may avoid sex and orgasms because of the mistaken fear of causing bleeding, infection, injury to the fetus, premature labor, or breaking the bag of water (amniotic sac) too early. It is true that penetrative vaginal intercourse and orgasms should be avoided if there is imminent danger of a miscarriage in the second and third trimester. Women need to know that amniotic fluid and a thick cervical plug that makes it unlikely that the fetus will experience any pressure or impact from vaginal penetration protect the fetus.

Pregnancy and child delivery may be a difficult time for the partner. Changes in sexual activities and stress about new family obligations make take an emotional or physical toll on the partner. Couples should make every effort to communicate their feelings in a sensitive but honest fashion. The partner may also benefit with a discussion to a friend, doctor, or a counselor about feelings during this time.

Bottom Line: Pregnancy and childbirth are a special time for the mother and her partner. Sexual intimacy can be an important part of life during pregnancy and after the baby is born. If you have concerns about engaging in sexual intimacy before and after delivery over your baby, speak to your doctor.

Low T May Be the Cause of Your ED (erectile dysfunction)

September 22, 2014

More than 14 million American men suffer from low testosterone levels. It is a normal consequence of aging just as menopause and low estrogen is a normal biological response in women.

Testosterone drives desire and the ability to have erections.

Levels drop naturally with age — by 75, a man’s levels may be half of what they were when he was 20 — but they vary widely with the individual, and experts believe low testosterone only rarely causes erectile dysfunction.

If you suffer from lack of energy, low sexual desire, falling asleep after meals and loss of muscle mass, you might consider asking your doctor to check your T levels— this involves a blood test.

A reading of greater than 300 ng\dl is considered normal, and below 300 is considered low.

If low, your doctor might offer you testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in the form of a topical gel applied to the skin, injections or pellets inserted under the skin every 4-6 months.

Bottom Line: Low T is a normal part of the aging process. If you have a low T level and have symptoms of low T, speak to your doctor about testosterone replacement therapy.

July 12, 2014

Urinary Problems Can Impact Your Sex

Overactive bladder or urge incontinence can have a significant impact on a man or woman’s quality of life include their ability to engage in sexual intimacy with their partner. This blog will discuss the concept of the overactive bladder and what can be done to tame the bladder and improve the intimacy of those who suffer from this condition.

OAB can take its toll in many areas of your life, including your romantic relationships. Women with OAB worry about urine leakage during sex or orgasm.

OAB or urinary incontinence can cause physical symptoms as well as fear, anxiety, and shame about sex and intimacy.
Unfortunately, many women with OAB will avoid sex altogether.
Unless you have a prolapsed bladder, sex is not dangerous and will not cause your bladder to become damaged.
Women may feel embarrassed by leakage during sex or orgasm, and even if their partner knows and says ‘It’s OK,’ it certainly can stop you from allowing oral sex.

Once you are open with your partner, you can face the situation together. For example, if there is urine incontinence during sex or orgasm, you may need a special sheet or towel.
Non-medication treatment for OAB

Natural Treatment for Overactive Bladder
Bladder training and pelvic floor exercises are just two natural treatments for overactive bladder. Research suggests that these non-drug remedies can be very effective for many women, and they have almost no side effects.
Before starting any OAB treatment, however, it’s important to understand bladder function and what factors may cause overactive bladder.
• Bladder training. This is the most common OAB treatment that doesn’t involve medication. Bladder training helps change the way you use the bathroom. Instead of going whenever you feel the urge, you urinate at set times of the day, called scheduled voiding. You learn to control the urge to go by waiting — for a few minutes at first, then gradually increasing to an hour or more between bathroom visits.
• Pelvic floor exercises. Just as you exercise to strengthen your arms, abs, and other parts of your body, you can exercise to strengthen the muscles that control urination. During these pelvic floor exercises, called Kegels, you tighten, hold, and then relax the muscles that you use to start and stop the flow of urination. Using a special form of training called biofeedback can help you locate the right muscles to squeeze. Start with just a few Kegel exercises at a time, and gradually work your way up to three sets of 10. Another method for strengthening pelvic floor muscles is with electrical stimulation, which sends a small electrical pulse to the area via electrodes placed in the vagina or rectum.
Until you get your overactive bladder under control, wearing absorbent pads can help hide any leakage that occurs.
Other behavioral tips for preventing incontinence include:
• Avoiding drinking caffeine or a lot of fluids before activities
Not drinking fluids right before you go to bed
I also suggest that before engaging in sexual intimacy, empty your bladder so there is less fluid in the bladder and not likely to trigger an unwanted bladder contraction.

Bottom Line: Intimacy can take place if either partner has an overactive bladder. Speak to your partner and your physician to find a solution for this common condition that doesn’t have to affect your sex life.

Sexual Wellness Program on Angela WWL, April 9, 2014

April 11, 2014

Angela Hill

Email: angela@wwl.com
Twitter: @AHillWWL

Angela: Help with sexual wellness is available, you just have to speak up!

by Angela Hill posted Apr 9 2014 4:22PM
Dr. Neil Baum has been a friend of “An Open Mind” ever since we started last fall, helping us understand medical issues that can affect our sex lives.

He spent a whole hour talking to WWL listeners today and pointed out that oftentimes, when it comes to sexual problems, women are suffering in silence, even though sexual dysfunction is more common in women than it is in men.

So what are the problems women are facing, and why can’t we speak out about it? It seems like every time you turn on the television or radio you hear an ad for a product that helps men with erectile dysfunction. Where is the help for women? Products to help women are just now starting to crack through, but haven’t gone mainstream yet.

So many men are having an open and honest dialogue with each other and their doctors, it is easy for them to speak out on these topics, but the lack of dialogue concercing female sexual dysfunction is holding women back. But it doesn’t have to be that way!

“Women who have problems with enjoyment, who have problems with dryness, who have problems with decreased libido are afraid to bring it up with their physicians. There are things that can be done for these women, and they should be encouraged to talk to their doctors,” Dr. Baum said. “Women have to understand that help is available for them, and they don’t have to suffer in silence.”

Is there Viagra for women?

“Right now, there is not. But there are things that can be done for decrease in drive for women, those whose interest is waning. It is primarily hormone-driven.”

Could hormone replacement therapy help your sex life? It’s not for everyone, but no matter what stage of life you are in, it’s imperative that you talk to your doctor, because there are options that can help you restore your love life.

One woman calls in to talk about her experience at “The Vagina Clinic,” where she found good medical advice from professionals tailored to her needs. Another man calls in with a question about testicular pain, and another with a question about fertility treatments

Everyone should take a moment to listen to the full interview – hear from men and women who have problems that may mirror those in your own life, or in the lives of your loved ones.

Bottom line? Talk to your Doctor!

FULL AUDIO: Angela talks to Dr. Neil Baum about sexual dysfunction and wellness

What Culprits Send Cupid Out of the Bedroom?

February 14, 2014

Today is Valentine’s Day, the day that couples think about love and intimacy. However, there are relationships where love and affection have left the bedroom. There are many culprits that can affect intimacy between a man and a woman.

Medications

There are literally hundreds of medications that can impact a man or a woman’s sex life. Medications that are prescribed for stroke and heart issues can have devastating effects on sexual functioning. In addition, researchers have found that a family of antidepressants known as selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) can take the wind right out of your sexual sails. These drugs include Prozac, Zoloft and Paxil.

Doctors can often reduce the dosage of these offending drugs or can change to another drug that can accomplish the same result without the sexual side effects.

Chronic Pain

People of both sexes can develop pain disorders as they get older, and that can have a big effect on sexuality. Arthritis and chronic back pain are just two examples. Those who suffer from chronic pain are advised to find the time of day when pain is at a minimum to engage in sexual intimacy. Also, those who suffer from chronic pain may need to take a pain pill before attempting to have sex. There are positions such as side by side that actually put the least amount of stress on your joints and your back and may make it possible to have successful intimacy.

Sex does not always equal intercourse. There are many successful relationships that do not have penis-vaginal intercourse. However, these people are able to engage in intimacy by sensual touching, massage and mutual masturbation.

Make Time for Rest and Play

The National Sleep Foundation recommends getting seven to eight hours of shut-eye a night. But with the stress of work, kids, bills and, oh yeah, your marriage, who can think about fitting in time to have sex, much less sleep? Still, you have to do your best to get a healthy amount of sleep.

Cupid likes to be included on regular dates. Plan some sex dates around times that you know you feel more energetic. You plan other things in your life and you don’t complain about it. You can do the same with sex.

Menopause and Testosterone Deficiency

Menopause and the accompanying decrease in sex drive and the appearance of vaginal dryness can wreak havoc on your sex life. Menopause results from a decrease in estrogens. The solution is as simple as applying a vaginal cream or a lubricant such as K-Y jelly or estrogens, which can be administered by a pill, a patch, topical gels, or a vaginal ring.

If you aren’t in the mood, you may be suffering from testosterone deficiency. This applies to women as well as men. Women also make low doses of testosterone and if the hormone is deficient, women may not be in the mood for sexual intimacy. The application of a topical gel or the insertion of a small pellet under the skin may quickly solve the problem of a lack of sex drive.

Bottom Line: Valentine’s Day is just one day a year. However, Cupid can be your best friend the other 364 days of the year. Try a few of these ideas to bring Cupid back into your bedroom. It’s the best threesome in the world!

This article appeared in the February 2014 issue of Health & Fitness Magazine

Sex After a Heart Attack: What You Need To Know

May 29, 2013
Your Average Middle Age Couple Who Are In Love And Wish To Be Sexually Active

Your Average Middle Age Couple Who Are In Love And Wish To Be Sexually Active

Every man or woman who has had a heart attack has concerns when they can begin having sexual intimacy after recovering from a heart attack. Certainly the movie, Something’s Gotta Give with Jack Nicholson and Diane Keaton, offers the protagonist advice about engaging in sexual intimacy after a heart attack until the man can climb two flights of stairs without shortness of breadth or chest pain. Every woman is concerned whether resuming sexual activity may trigger another heart attack in her partner. We know depression is extremely common after a heart attack, especially for women. This blog will attempt to answer some of those questions that men and women have after a heart attack.

First, most cardiologist believe it is helpful for men to be in a supervised exercise program. These cardiac rehab programs teach men and women that it’s OK for them to exercise after a heart attack.

However, if you begin to feel symptoms such as chest pain, abnormal shortness of breath, fatigue, dizziness, or palpitations, it definitely makes sense to slow down what you’re doing, whether you’re a man or a woman. If you’re pretty certain it’s angina, which is temporary pain or pressure in the chest when the heart doesn’t get enough oxygen, it might help to take your nitroglycerin tablet under your tongue.

Now the warning: Just like the movie, Something’s Gotta Give, men who use medication for erectile dysfunction, such as Viagra, Levitra, or Cialis, — they should not take nitroglycerin. Your blood pressure can fall to dangerously low levels, and there’s an increased risk of heart attack and even death. If you’re on an erectile dysfunction drug and have heart-related symptoms during sex, call your doctor.

Yes, and sexual intimacy is often related to the emotions that follow a diagnosis of heart disease. It influences people’s lives in many different ways, and sexual activity is one of them. A new diagnosis of heart disease — or even a surgical scar — can make people feel less attractive. Some drugs have side effects that diminish sexual interest and performance. When patients feel angry and frustrated, it affects not only their sex lives but also their “couple” relationships.

Sexual intimacy is like a stress test. Engaging in sex shows that you’re capable of doing physical activity in which your heart rate and blood pressure go up. In a sense, you’re doing a stress test on your heart. If you tolerate that well and you feel good doing it, it suggests good things about your overall level of fitness and therefore your risk of heart disease.
Sex can also be a sign of healthy relationships and social supports. It shows you have the opportunities, frankly, and that you’re interested and engaged. Sex is a barometer for overall health.

Bottom Line: Sex is a good thing and sex is okay after a heart attack if your doctor gives you permission to exercise and engage in sexual intimacy. This is a discussion every man and woman needs to have with their doctor after having a heart attack and before leaving the hospital.

All You Need Is Love-Putting Romance Into Your Sex Life

January 19, 2013

February is the month of love and romance. Wouldn’t it be nice to jump start your love life and put some fun and fantasy back into your relationship with your significant other? Let me give you a few suggestions that may just light the fire of your partner.

Exercise. Aerobic workouts (running, biking, swimming) not only improve blood flow to the tissues “down there” for both men and women but can also boost your mood, pumping up “feel good” brain chemicals called endorphins. Exercise also has the benefit of increasing the testosterone level for both men and women about one hour after working out and will have a natural way of increasing your libido or sex drive.

Stress. Stress is anti-erotic. Too much stress increases the stress hormone cortisol, which causes testosterone to plummet. Stress relief can be obtained in just 15 minutes a day, whether through meditation, yoga, chilling to music, or just lay down and get your legs up and take the weight off of your shoulders.

Try something different. Recent research shows that partaking in new and challenging experiences with your partner can boost the brain chemical dopamine, which helps fuel sex drive. Try watching an erotic video or a sex toy. I recommend Lelo.com for some very sophisticated erotica.

Consider supplements. Ginkgo biloba has been used to treat sexual dysfunction, although the evidence for benefit is very weak. Still, it’s relatively safe (just don’t take it if you’re on a blood thinner), and the placebo effect may be enough to put you in the mood.

Take a deep breath. Certain scents are known to be attractive to women. Humans have a complex sense of smell. Certain scents have the effect of making a person hungry, tired, relaxed, happy and sometimes, turned on. Aromatherapy has been used for over 5000 years as a healing art and is still widely practiced in the Far East. Certain scents have been used for lovers for almost as long. In fact, scents are mentioned in the Kama Sutra as part of the art of seduction. You can uses these in baths, in a diffuser, or added to massage oil for extra intimacy. Some of these erotic scents include basil, cedarwood, frankincense, ginger, lavender, lime, orange, lime and rose.

Alcohol, just enough to turn on but not so much to turn off. One alcoholic drink can lubricate a nervous first-date situation. By reducing anxiety one drink can help get you in the mood. Remember, that too much booze can be a depressant and dampen the moment of intimacy and can even make it difficult for a man to obtain an erection.

Stop Smoking. It’s well known that smoking can have a terrible affect on blood flow to the sexual organs as it causes the blood vessels to narrow. It also saps your stamina and most people don’t like kissing cigarette breath.

Massage. Massage techniques can do wonders for sexual arousal particularly if you’re stressed, worried or angry. Prepare the room with soft lighting and soothing music then start with a back massage.

Bottom Line: Loss of libido is just one aspect of male and female sexual dysfunction. This Valentine’s Day make a commitment to bring Cupid into your sex life. Get out of your comfort zone and try something new and put a little romance into your relationship with that special someone.

Dr. Neil Baum is a physician at Touro Infirmary and the author of What’s Going On Down There-The Complete Guide To Women’s Pelvic Health. Available from Amazon.com